August 19, 2017

Pages 657-658
Whole Number 38

THE LAST WILL OF 7.1 ISAAC SPARKS (died 1834)
OF HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO



(The following is a copy made from a photostat of the original will on file in Hamilton County, Ohio. Punctuation has been supplied and capitalization has been standardized for clarity, but the content and spelling has been copied exactly.)

Isaac Sparks, Senr., of Hamilton County, state of Ohio, being weak in body and in a declineing state of health for some time past, but of sound mind and memory, thanks be to God for it, do make this my last will and testamet in form as follows:

I will that my beloved wife have third of my real estate set off to her by three disintrested men, which shall be chosen one by my wife and one by my executors and the other by the two first chosen, whose duty is to lay off to her her third part in as equal a manner as the situation of the premises may admit, to be for my wife to live on and draw her support from during her natural life, after that to be sold and equally divided the money among my surviving children.

After the third has thus been laid off to my wife, the residue of the tract to sell for money with in one year after my decease & I authorize my executors thus to do and sell to the best advantage in their power, and the money arising from the sale of the land and personal property that may be sold, not other ways disposed of, to be, after paying all debts, divided as follows:

I will Folly Seward, wife of Obadiah Seward, my second daughter, one Hundred & eighty dollars.

My third daughter, Rachel Long, one hundred & forty dollars.

Nancy Cock, my fourth daughter, two hundred twenty dollars.

I will Sally Legget, my fifth daughter, two hundred & twenty dollars.

I will my two grand daughters, Elizabeth & Harriet McCash, forty two dollars each.

William Sparks, my eldest son, having had his full share of my estate, yet extra of that I will him twenty dollars.

I will my grand son, Frank Sparks, fifty dollars.

I will my wife her share of my personal estate: two beds and beding and bedstead, the two best cows, the gray mare and carriage with harness, the corner cubbart with its contents, English cubbard, brakfast table, best stand and big Bible, six chairs, best looking glass, pair of best shovel & tongs, her carpets and the clock, and one hundred and fifty dollars in money.

The lot I have in Mount Pleasant I will to Eria Sparks, my grandson; if he does not survive, then to Martha Sparks, his sister. The lot of ground & house that I bought of James Hole I will to my son, Isaac Sparks.

Some few other articles I will to my wife not before mentioned: all the new bed quilts, the two brass kettles, dinner pot, stew kettle, tea kettle, three coffee pots, the knives and forks and vinegar hogshead. My executors will understand that not withstanding I have set off certain sums of money to my four daughters, yet my meaning and intention is that they all be paid equal sums, taking into consideration what they have received from me. I will that all moneys after all xpenses are paid, not otherways disposed of, shall be divided to my surviving daughters as above stated. I nominate my good friends and appoint James McCash and Steward McGill, Eqs., my executors.

I revoke all other wills & codasals by me made up to this date. I here unto set my hand and seal this fifteenth day of July 1834.

Witnesses: [Signed] Isaac Sparks (seal)

[signed] Reuben S. Compton

Samuel Johson

(Editor's Note: Little is know at present of the family of 7.1 Isaac Sparks whose will appears above. Since this will was written on July 15, 1834, and was filed on September 6, 1834, we know that Isaac Sparks died sometime between those two dates. We know that he was a resident of Hamilton County, Ohio, at least as early as 1798 for he was listed as a voter that year. Apparently he came from New Jersey because, according to the 1850 census, his daughter, Mary or Polly, was born in New Jersey ca. 1795. From his will, we know that Isaac Sparks had five daughters --the eldest was not named for she had died prior to 1834; apparently she had been married to a man named McCash (perhaps the James McCash whom Isaac named as an executor) and had left two daughters, Elizabeth and Harriet McCash.

The other four daughters were:

7.1.2 Daughter, married a man named McCash

7.1.2.1 Elizabeth McCash
7.1.2.2 Harriet McCash

7.1.3 Polly Sparks, nickname for Mary, who married Obadiah Seward;
7.1.4 Rachel Sparks, who married a man named Long;
7.1.5 Nancy Sparks, who married a man named Cock; and
7.1.7 Isaac Sparks, Jr.,
7.1.8 Thompson Sparks
7.1.9 Sally Sparks, who married a man named Legget.
7.1.10 Rhoda Sparks

Isaac Sparks apparently had two sons:

7.1.1 William Sparks who was probably the William Sparks who married Jane Wiggins (Note: this is incorrect. Please see below.) in Hamilton County on October 14, 1819; and
7.1.7 Isaac Sparks, Jr., born ca. 1805 who married Rebecca and was still living in Hamilton County when the 1850 census was taken. The children of Isaac. Sparks, Jr., and his wife Rebecca, as listed on the census, were:

7.1.7.1 Alford Sparks, born ca. 1831;
7.1.7.2 Elizabeth Sparks, born ca. 1832;
7.1.7.3 Ermsley Sparks (female) born ca. 1834;
7.1.7.4 Sarah Sparks, born ca. 1842;
7.1.7.5 William Sparks, born ca. 1843;
7.1.7.6 Andrew Sparks, born ca. 1842;
7.1.7.7 Edward Sparks, born ca. 1847; and
7.1.7.8 Roda Sparks, born 1850.


Page 1009
Whole Number 55

ADDITIONAL NOTES ON 7.1 ISAAC SPARKS (died 1834) OF HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO


In the June, 1962, issue of the Quarterly (Whole No. 38, p. 657) we published the will of 7.1 Isaac Sparks of Hamilton County, Ohio. At that time we had no information regarding his date of birth nor his exact death date. Since then, Mrs. Howard K. Pierce, who descends from Isaac Sparks's daughter Mary (who married Obadiah Seward) has learned that the tombstone on the grave of Isaac Sparks still survives. It is located in a small cemetery called the McCrea Cemetery, located on the property of the Pillar of Fire, a religious organization at College Hill in Hamilton County, Ohio, near Cincinnati. Isaac Sparks's tombstone gives his birth date as November 24, 1768, and his death date as August 21, 1834. (He had written his will on July 15, 1834.) Isaac Sparks apparently married twice. There is a stone in the McCrea Cemetery which reads: "Sally Sparks, wife of Isaac Sparks, died December 17, 1825 in her 55th year." (She was thus born in 1871.) There is another stone which reads: "Sarah Sparks, wife of Isaac Sparks, died March 14, 1839, aged 31 years and 5 months." (She was thus born in Oct, 1807.) The latter must have been the wife whom Isaac Sparks mentioned in his will. There is also a stone in the McCrea Cemetery for Rhoda Sparks, daughter of Isaac and Sally Sparks, who died on November 1, 1825, aged 9 years.

In his will, Isaac Sparks mentioned his grandson, Frank Sparks, to whom he left $50.00. We have now learned that Frank Sparks, whose real name was 7.1.8.1 Francis M. Sparks, was the only son of 7.1.8 Thompson Sparks, who was a son of Isaac and Sally Sparks. Thompson Sparks died on November 14, 1833, some eight months before his father, Isaac, made his will.

From the information now available, it appears that Isaac Sparks had the following children by his first wife, Sally: (order of birth not known):

7.1.2 Elizabeth Sparks, born 1793 and died 1825. She married a man named James McCash (1788-1871). She had daughters named 7.1.1.1 Elizabeth McCash and 7.1.1.2 Harriet McCash whom Isaac Sparks mentioned as his granddaughters in his will.

7.1.3 Mary (called Polly) Sparks, born in New Jersey ca. 1795; she married Obadiah Seward, who was born in South Carolina ca. 1790 and came to Hamilton County, Ohio, about 1800. In 1824 they moved to Rush County, Indiana. They had children named Joseph Irvin, Samuel, Sarah, Elcy, Francis, Ruth, William, and Louann P.

7.1.4 Rachel Sparks, married FNU Long.
7.1.5 Nancy Sparks, married FNU Cock.
7.1.9 Sally Sparks, married FNU Legget.

7.1.1 William Sparks; he was probably the William Sparks who married Jane Wiggins in Hamilton County, Ohio, on October 14, 1819.

7.1.7 Isaac Sparks, Jr., born ca. 1805; he married Rebecca and was still living in Hamilton County, Ohio, when the 1850 census was taken. His children as listed on that census were:

7.1.7.1 Alford Sparks,
7.1.7.2 Elizabeth Sparks,
7.1.7.3 Ermsley Sparks,
7.1.7.4 Sarah Sparks,
7.1.7.5 William Sparks,
7.1.7.6 Andrew Sparks,
7.1.7.7 Edward Sparks, and
7.1.7.8 Roda Sparks.

7.1.8 Thompson Sparks, born in Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1808 and died in Rush County, Indiana, on November 14, 1833. He was married in Rush County, Indiana, on 2 February 1832, to Lucy Jane Head. They had one son, 7.1.8.1 Francis M. Sparks.

7.1.10 Rhoda Sparks, born ca. 1816 and died in Hamilton County, Ohio, on November 1, 1825.


Pages 1167-1169
Whole Number 63

ADDITIONAL NOTES ON THE DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC SPARKS

(1768-1834)

OF HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO


In the Quarterly of June 1962 (Whole No. 38, page 657) we published the will of 7.1 Isaac Sparks (born 1768, died 1834) of Hamilton County, Ohio. Additional notes on Isaac Sparks appeared in the Quarterly of September 1966 (Whole No. 55, pp. 1009-1010). In the Quarterly of March 1968, Whole No. 61, pp. 1135-1142 appeared an article on 7. William Sparks (died 1788) of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, who was Isaac Sparks's father.

In his will dated July 15, 1834, Isaac Sparks mentioned each of his nine children, one of whom he called "Nancy Cock, my fourth daughter,” to whom he left $220.00. Until recently we had only this one reference to Nancy, daughter of Isaac Sparks, but a few months ago a new member of the Association, Mrs. David Gibbs, was able to provide detailed information on Nancy (who was Mrs. Gibbs' s great-great-grandmother).

7.1.5 Nancy Sparks, daughter of Isaac Sparks, was born in 1800, probably in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Her mother was Isaac's first wife, Sarah (or Sally), whose tombstone still stands in the McCrea Cemetery at College Hill in Hamilton County, Ohio, on property now owned by the Pillar of Fire, a religious organization.

According to her tombstone, "Sally Sparks, wife of Isaac Sparks, died December 17, 1825, in her 55th year.” Her maiden name was Sarah Hankins (or Hawkins). Isaac Sparks's tombstone in the same cemetery gives his birth date as November 24, 1768, and his death date as August 21, 1834. Isaac Sparks brought his family to Springfield Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, sometime prior to the spring of 1818. He was a justice of the peace in Hamilton County from 1818 until 1820. One of his earliest acts as a justice of the peace was to judge a case in which Alexander Campbell brought suit against Robert William to pay a debt of six dollars and three shillings. This was the Alexander Campbell who, with his father, Thomas Campbell, Walter Scott and Barton W. Stone, founded the Disciples of Christ (Christian Church). Isaac Sparks was a convert to this church and was custodian of the "Ministerial Funds” for the Christian Church of Colerain Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, from 1822 to 1829. (Many of the records kept by Isaac Sparks are now in the possession of a great-great-grandson, Mr. Buell McCash, of Columbia, Missouri. A sketch recently located of the life of a grandson of Isaac Sparks contains the interesting statement that Isaac Sparks "swam the Ohio River at one time in order to escape from Indians.” (History of Miami County, Ohio, Chicago, Lewis Pub. Co., p. 580.)

7.1.5 Nancy Sparks, fourth daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Hawkins) Sparks, was often called "Anna” as a nickname. She was married on November 2, 1820, in Hamilton County, Ohio, to Tunis Cock. The name Cock was often spelled Cox, and Tunis and his descendants adopted the "Cox” spelling. Tunis was a son of William G. Cock (or Cox), a stonemason who was born in New Jersey in 1778 and settled in Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1809. He died on October 9, 1860. Tunis Cox's mother's name was Mary; she died March 9, 1852. (See Henry A. Ford's History of Hamilton County, Ohio, published in 1881, page 372.) Tunis Cox was nine years old when his father brought the family to Ohio. Following his marriage to Nancy Sparks, they lived for two years at North Bend Fort. They then "settled in Springfield near New Burlington, where he [Tunis Cox], kept the old Eleven-mile House, or Farmer's Rest, on the Hamilton Pike, which was known as one of the best hotels of the county outside the city.” (See Ford's History of Hamilton County, page 372.)

Tunis and Nancy (Sparks) Cox were the parents of the following children:

7.1.5.1 William Cox, born October 7, 1821.
7.1.5.2 Thompson Cox, born November 29, 1822; married Susan Patterson in 1845.
7.1.5.3 Mary Ann Cox, born June 21, 1824; married Nicholas Goshorn (?)
7.1.5.4 Sally Cox, born December 6, 1825; married a Titus.
7.1.5.5 Gresham Cox, born March 18, 1827.
7.1.5.6 Andrew Jackson Cox, born 6 February 1829.
7.1.5.7 Elizabeth Cox, born December 12, 1830.
7.1.5.8 Isaac Cox, born March 17, 1832.
7.1.5.9 Martha Jane Cox, born September 1, 1834.
7.1.5.10 Harriet Cox, born January 8, 1836, died June 25, 1868; married Alexander Dom, Sr.
7.1.5.11 George Washington Cox, born December 27, 1837; married Rebecca Ayres in 1858; he married (second) Mrs. Martin (Hole) Smith in 1868.
7.1.5.12 Catherine Cox, born June 5, 1839.

Nancy (Sparks) Cox, wife of Tunis, died on June 7, 1841. Tunis married as his second wife Sarah Sauter on April 7, 1842.

Mrs. Gibbs has generously loaned us a daguerrotype of Harriet Cox (born 1836, died 1868), daughter of Tunis and Nancy (Sparks) Cox. With her in this picture is her husband, Alexander Dom, Sr., who was born in 1834 and died on June 28, 1898. This was probably their wedding picture. Alexander and Harriet (Cox) Dom, Sr., were the parents of the following children:

7.1.5.10.1 & 7.4.10.2 Twins, died in infancy.
7.1.5.10.3 Alma Dom, married FNU Wolfram.
7.1.5.10.4 William Dom.
7.1.5.10.5 Alexander Dom, Jr., born February 12, 1865, in Piqua, Ohio, died January 10, 1930; he married Catherine Smith on June 14, 1887. Mrs. Gibbs is a granddaughter of this union.
7.1.5.10.6 G. Ivan Dom, born 1866.

After Harriet's death, Alexander Dom, Sr., married Anna Chick by whom he had five children.


Page 1420-1421
Whole Number 75

Photostatic copies of two documents, beneath which is the following caption:

Photostatic copy of entries made by Isaac Sparks, Sr. (1768-1834) in his hand Bible, purchased by him in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the year 1819 for the sum of $4.50. The Bible is owned by Mr. Buell McCash, Columbia, Missouri, who is the great-great-grandson of Isaac Sparks, Sr., whose daughter, Elizabeth Sparks, married James McCash, the paternal great-grandfather of Buell McCash.

ADDITIONAL NOTES ON ISAAC SPARKS (1768-1834)


In The Sparks Quarterly for March 1968 (Whole No, 61, p. 142) we noted that Mr. Buell McCash of Columbia, Missouri, owns a Bible that had been owned originally by his great-great-grandfather, 7.1 Isaac Sparks, who was born November 24, 1768, and died in or near Cincinnati, Ohio, on August 21, 1834. The will of Isaac Sparks was printed in the Quarterly of June 1962 (Whole No, 38, p. 657) and additional notes appeared in the Quarterly of September 1966 (Whole No. 55, pp. 1009-1010). We were positive that Isaac Sparks was the eldest son of William and Rachel Sparks of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, but we did not have a written record to prove this relationship beyond any possible doubt. Mr. McCash has now provided this positive written record from the pocket Bible of Isaac Sparks.

Mr. McCash had reported earlier that the front fly-leaf of this small hand-Bible bears an inscription in Isaac Sparks's handwriting that he had bought it "at Cincinnati in the year 1819 price $4.50.” Likewise, Mr. McCash had copied the record on the same fly-leaf of three deaths, that of his 9-year old daughter, Rhoda Sparks on November 1, 1825; that of his married daughter, Elizabeth (Sparks) McCash, on December 7, 1825; and that of his first wife, Sally (Hankins) Sparks on December 17, 1825. Until recently, however, Mr. McCash believed these to be the only entries in the Bible, and because of the carbonization of the paper, he was reluctant to handle it. Recently he thumbed through it, however, and to his surprise and delight, found three additional entries on the reverse side of the flyleaf marking the commencement of the New Testament. One of these entries is a record of Isaac Sparks's own birth date, November 24, 1768, which we had found earlier on his tombstone. The next entry, however, is of major importance, because there Isaac Sparks not only recorded the maiden name of his first wife, but also the names of his own parents. This entry reads: "Isaac Sparks, son of Wrn. & Rachel Sparks, married Sally Hankins May 6th 1790.” The final entry records the death of his first wife as also appears at the beginning of the Bible, but in this second entry, Isaac Sparks gave her age at death as " the fifty-fifth year of her age,” thus she was born ca. 1770, but he also gave the time of her death, "at 5 oclock Saturday morning.”

Photostatic reproductions of these entries in the handwriting of Isaac Sparks have been reproduced on page 1420. We are grateful to Mr. McCash for providing these for use in the Quarterly.


Pages 1604-1611
Whole Number 84

STILL MORE DATA ON THE FAMILY OF 7.1 ISAAC SPARKS (1768-1834)
by Russell E. Bidlack


One of the advantages of publishing a family magazine, as opposed to waiting until one has accumulated sufficient material to publish a book, is that it is always possible to make an addition or a correction in a subsequent issue. In the June 1962 issue of the Quarterly (Whole No. 38, p. 657) we published the will of an Isaac Sparks, dated July 15, 1834, that had been found in Hamilton County, Ohio. At that time, our knowledge of the family of Isaac Sparks was limited to that which he revealed in his bequests. In the September 1966 issue (Whole No. 55, pp. 1009-1010), we reported that a descendant of Isaac Sparks, Mrs. Howard K. Pierce, had sent us information following her discovery of the tombstones (with birth and death dates) of Isaac Sparks and his two wives at College Hill, in Hamilton County, Ohio. We had accumulated sufficient data by 1966 to speculate quite accurately regarding nine of Isaac's children. Later we were to learn that he actually had ten children. Two years later, in the March 1968 issue of the Quarterly (Whole No. 61, pp. 1135-1142, incorrectly numbered 1117-1124) we were able to publish a sketch of the life of William Sparks of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, who died in 1788 and whom we strongly believed to have been the father of Isaac Sparks. We were able also to report at that time that we had located another descendant of Isaac Sparks. Mr. Buell McCash of Columbia, Missouri, who owns a great many of Isaac's papers, including his pocket Bible purchased in 1819. As a result of data furnished us by Mr. McCash, we were able to add still further facts regarding Isaac's life.

In the Quarterly for September 1968 (Whole No. 63, pp. 1167-69) we reported that Mrs. David Gibbs had identified her great-great-grandmother, 7.1.5 Nancy (Sparks) Cox as a daughter of Isaac Sparks, and we were able to give a list of the children of Nancy. Then, in September 1971 (Whole No. 75, pp. 1420-21), we reported that Mr. McCash had discovered some notes in the old pocket Bible of Isaac Sparks that he had never seen before. These provided documentary proof that Isaac Sparks (1768-1834) had, indeed, been a son of William and Rachel Sparks of Fayette County, Pennsylvania. From this record, we were also able to determine the maiden name of Isaac's first wife and her age at the date of her death. There remained, however, many unanswered questions regarding Isaac's children.

In January 1973, a letter came to the editor from Sally Baker (Mrs. W. T.) of Dallas, Texas. She had seen a notice regarding the Sparks Family Association in the Genealogical Helper and wrote to inquire whether we had any information regardirig her great-great-great-grandmother, 7.1.4 Rachel Sparks, who was a daughter of Isaac Sparks (born November 24, 1768). Mrs. Baker further revealed that in 1905, her great-grandfather, Dr. Henderson Free Hornaday, who had married a great-granddaughter of Isaac Sparks, had compiled a genealogical record of the family. Mrs. Baker has kindly supplied us with a xerox copy of the original manuscript. It is apparent that Dr. Hornaday had access to family records that may no longer exist. The record that Dr. Hornaday prepared gives every evidence of painstaking accuracy.

Among Dr. Hornaday' s papers, are three pages of notes made by his father-in-law, William Preston Long (1825 -1912), whose mother was Rachel (Sparks) Long, daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Hankins) Sparks. In writing of his mother's family, William Preston Long stated: "My Mother's Family: Her father's name was Isaac Sparks, Born November 24th 1768. Her Mother's maiden name was Sarah Hankins, Born February 20th 1771. They raised a family of 10 children." He then listed the children, with dates of birth, as follows:

The children of Isaac and Sarah (Hankins) Sparks:

7.1.1 William Sparks, born March 18, 1791.
7.1.2 Elizabeth Sparks, born April 22, 1793.
7.1.3 Polly Sparks, born January 5, 1795.
7.1.4 Rachel Sparks, born September 19, 1798.
7.1.5 Nancy Sparks, born October 2, 1800.
7.1.6 John Sparks, born October 8, 1802.
7.1.7 Isaac Sparks, born September 25, 1805.
7.1.8 Thompson Sparks, born December 1, 1808.
7.1.9 Sally Sparks, born December 28, 1810.
7.1.10 Rhoda Sparks, born November 5, 1816.

It seems probable that Dr. Henderson Free Hornaday used the above record, prepared by his father-in-law, William Preston Long, in compiling his own genealogical record of this branch of the Sparks family. However, in giving his own record of the children of Isaac Sparks, Dr. Hornaday gave two slightly different dates. Whereas Mr. Long gave Sarah (Hankins) Sparks, wife of Isaac, as born February 20, 1771, Dr. Hornaday gave the date as "February 20th 1770”. Whereas Mr. Long gave the birth date of Sally Sparks, daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Hankins) Sparks, as December 28, 1810, Dr. Hornaday gave the date as "December 20th 1810”. We cannot tell which dates are correct; both Mr. Long and Dr. Hornaday may have copied from the same Bible record and perhaps interpreted the handwriting in these entries differently. Neither Mr. Long nor Dr. Hornaday mentioned the date of marriage of Isaac Sparks and Sarah Hankins - - this is recorded in the pocket Bible owned by Mr. McCash as May 6, 1790.

In his record of the family. Dr. Hornaday gave the date of death of Isaac Sparks as 1833, with neither month nor day. From Isaac's tombstone, we know that he actually died on August 21, 1834. No mention was made either by Mr. Long or Dr. Hornaday of the fact that Sarah (Hankins) Sparks died on December 17, 1825 (according to her tombstone), and that Isaac Sparks married as his second wife another woman named Sarah, maiden name not yet discovered, who died on March 14, 1839. According to her tombstone, this second wife was 31 years and 5 months of age when she died; she was thus born in October 1807. Apparently, there were no children by this second wife.

In another section of his genealogical record, Dr. Hornaday gave what information he had available regarding each of the children of Isaac and Sarah (Hankins) Sparks. In the following paragraphs, Dr. Hornaday's statements are given as quotations, with further notes by the present writer:

Children of Isaac and Sarah (Hankins) Sparks:

7.1.1 William Sparks was born March 18, 1791. According to Dr. Hornaday, "William married and moved to Rush Co., MD. and had a family of children, and where his wife died; he married a second wife and moved to northwest Missouri. where he raised another family of children, and where he died at a ripe old age.” Dr. Hornaday apparently did not know the name of either of William's wives, nor could he name any of the children. However, his brief description of the life of William Sparks leaves little doubt that he was the William Sparks whose will, written on August 14, 1876, in Atchison County, Missouri, appeared in the Quarterly of September 1968 (Whole No. 63, p. 1172). There we also published a query by Mrs. Gerald H. Reynolds, a great-greatgranddaughter of William Sparks. Mrs. Reynolds has known that the William Sparks who was her great-great-grandfather, was born between June 1790 and August 14, 1791. Note that William, son of Isaac Sparks, was born March 18, 1791. Everything else also fits - - there is ample evidence that Mrs. Reynolds' great-great-grandfather was married twice and had children by both wives, as Dr. Hornaday stated. Sarah, daughter of William Sparks, born October 8, 1824, was born, accordIng to her death certificate, in Rush County, Indiana, where Dr. Hornaday states that William Sparks, son of Isaac, moved from Ohio. Mrs. Reynolds' great-greatgrandfather, William Sparks, is known to have moved to Missouri in the late 1830's, settling with his second wife, Mary Templeton, in Atchison County, which is, as Dr. Hornaday stated, in the north-west corner of Missouri.
William Sparks's first wife is believed to have been Sarah Howell; they were probably married in Hamilton County, Ohio, before 1815. She died before 1830. It is believed that Sarah Howell was a daughter of Chatfield Howell whose last will was probated on March 12, 1832; he had written it on July 2, 1830. In his will, Chatfield Howell referred to "heirs of my daughter Sarah.” Earlier (see p. 1173 of the Quarterly) we had speculated that William's wife had been Catherine Howell because a William Sparks and wife Catherine sold land in Rush County, Indiana, in 1825 (Book B, p. 1). We now believe that this was another William Sparks.
On February 28, 1830, William Sparks married (second) a widow named Mary Templeton, in Franklin County, Indiana. From her tombstone, it would appear that she was born June 6, 1802; she died December 22, 1879, near Rock Port, Atchison County, Missouri. Mary Templeton was a widow of William Templeton whose father, Robert Templeton, mentioned his daughter-in-law, Mary, in his will dated October 7, 1829 (Franklin County Order Book B, 1827-1834, p. 115) as well as her two children, James Mortimer Templeton (born March 11, 1822) and Elizabeth Ann Templeton (born July 11, 1824). In the July 1831 term of the Probate Court of Franklin County, Indiana, William Sparks was appointed guardian of these two children (Franklin County Order Book B, 1827-1834, p. 119).
by his first wife, William Sparks had the following children:
7.1.1.1 William J. Sparks. He may have been the William Sparks who was born between 1815 and 1820 who was married in 1840 (license issued August 10, 1840) in Hancock County, Indiana, to Olive Wilkinson. This family was living in Brown Township, Hancock County, Indiana, when the 1850 census was taken. William's age was given as 32, with birth place as Indiana; Olive's age was given as 31, born in Virginia. They had two children, 7.1.1.1.1 Ann Eliza Sparks, born ca. 1847, and 7.1.1.1.2 Sarah Sparks, born in 1850. William and Olive were listed also on the 1860 census of the same township with the same two children. William J. Sparks was still living in 1876 when his father wrote his will.
7.1.1.2 Charlotte Sparks; she married Albert Herrick (or Kerrick) in 1833. She was still living when her father wrote his will in 1876.
7.1.1.3 Sarah Sparks, born October 8, 1824 (???). She was married on October 18, 1842, to George Washington Scott. See page 1174 of the Quarterly for a list of their children.
7.1.1.4 Anna M. Sparks; she married Sampson LNU and had died prior to 1880.
7.1.1.5 Eliza A. Sparks; she married Dubois and had died prior to 1876.
by his second wife, William Sparks had the following children:
7.1.1.6 Oliver G. Sparks, born ca. 1832. (See the Quarterly, p. 1174)
7.1.1.7 Susah H. Sparks, born ca. 1835; she married William Bartholomew.
7.1.1.8 Martha B. Sparks, born ca. 1839; she married - - - - - Davis.

7.1.2 Elizabeth Sparks was born, according to Dr. Hornaday's records, on April 22, 1793. He added the following note: "Elizabeth married a man by the name of James McCash. They lived in Hamilton Co., Ohio, and raised a family of children and she died.”

7.1.2 Elizabeth Sparks was the great-grandmother of Mr. Buell McCash. His records give her birth as April 19, 1793 (rather than April 22). She died on December 7, 1825. She married James McCash, who was born August 26, 1788, and died October 23, 1871. He was the second son of David Lenoir McCash (born January 1, 1758, died September 20, 1832) and Margaret Ewing (born February 14, 1758, died September 22, 1804). David Lenoir McCash and Margaret Ewing were married in Glasgow, Scotland, in October 1779. (James McCash once owned a major portion of the present-day Fountain Square, civic center of modern Cincinnati, Ohio, but finding the soil unproductive, he sold this tract and bought a farm about nine miles away at Mt. Healthy.) James McCash and Elizabeth Sparks were the parents of the following children:
7.1.2.1 David McCash. He was married twice, first to Mary Bruin and second to - - - - - Derby.
7.1.2.2 Harriet McCash. She married William Osborn.
7.1.2.3 Isaac Sparks McCash, born April 28, 1819, died March 5, 1911. He married Martha Ann VanZandt, who was born August 14, 1823, and died February 23, 1906. They were the parents of eleven children, one of whom was 7.1.2.3.x Isaac Newton McCash (born June 5, 1861, died May 20, 1961) who was the father of 7.1.2.3.x.y Buell McCash. Mr. McCash owns the pocket Bible once the property of Isaac Sparks; he also owns Isaac Sparks's Justice of the Peace Docket for Colerain Township, Hamilton County, Ohio.
7.1.2.4 Sarah Ann McCash. She never married.
7.1.2.5 Israel McCash. He married Sarah Ann Loper.
7.1.2.6 Elizabeth McCash, She married Jediah Stout Hill.
Following the death of Elizabeth (Sparks) McCash in 1825, James McCash was married a second time, to a woman whose name was also Elizabeth, but Mr. McCash has not succeeded in finding her maiden name. She was knownin the family as "Aunt Betsy.” by her, James McCash had a son named John McCash.
7.1.3 Polly Sparks was born January 5, 1795. (Polly was often a nickname for Mary, but whether this daughter was actually named Polly or Mary we do not know.) Dr. Hornaday gave the following information: "Polly married Obadiah Seward in Hamilton Co., Ohio. They moved to Rush Co., Ind., and raised a family of four boys and five girls. After their children were most grown they moved to Madison Co., Ind., where they died.”
A member of the Association, Mrs. Mildred Pierce of Wichita, Kansas, descends from this daughter of Isaac Sparks and has provided additional information, as follows: Both Obadiah and Polly are buried in the Harlan Cemetery in Hancock County, Indiana. According to his tombstone, Obadiah died on February 21, 1867, at the age of 76 years, 5 months and 3 days. This would mean that he was born on September 18, 1790. Polly (Sparks) Seward, wife of Obadiah, died on February 20, 1870; her age on the tombstone appears as 75 years, 1 month, and 15 days. This gives us her birth date as January 5, 1795, which matches exactly the record made by William Preston Long.
Obadiah Seward was a son of Samuel and Elsie (Gentry) Seward who came to Hamilton County, Ohio, about 1800. It was probably between 1810 and 1815 that Obadiah and Polly were married. In 1824 they moved to Indiana, the Fayette and Rush County area; they later lived in Hancock County where they died. Dr. Hornaday stated that they had four sons and five daughters. Mrs. Pierce has a record of four sons and four daughters, as follows:
7.1.3.1 Joseph Irvin Seward, married Charlotte Hopper.
7.1.3.2 Samuel Seward, married Elizabeth Loveless.
7.1.3.3 Sarah Seward, married Dr. Gregg.
7.1.3.4 Elcy Seward, married John Van Dyke.
7.1.3.5 Francis Seward, married Phoebe Van tbrke (###).
7.1.3.6 Ruth Seward, married John Huston.
7.1.3.7 Louann P. Seward, born ca. 1830 married Daniel Franklin.
7.1.3.8 William Seward, born ca. 1833, married Mary Ann Justice.
7.1.4 Rachel Sparks was born September 19, 1798. She married Daniel Long on October 14, 1819. Since this was Dr. Hornaday's branch of the family, he gave full information regarding this family, including the following sketch of Daniel Long' a life:

"In early childhood, Daniel Long went with his parents from Pennsylvania to Ohio, where they located on the present site of Cincinnati, where they lived some years in a block house. They then moved some ten or twelve miles north of Cincinnati where his father died on April 14, 1801. Later his mother married a man by the name of Isaac Starrett; with them he lived on the farm until he reached manhood, when he married Rachel Sparks. They purchased and occupied a small farm seven miles north west of Cincinnati, the then growing center of commerce, which furnished a ready market for the products of the little farm. While living on this farm, five children, four boys and one girl, were born to them. About February, 1833, they sold their farm and moved to Noble Township, Rush County, Ind., where they purchased a larger farm. by industry and economy and good business judgement, he was able to add other acres to his original purchase, until he owned 240 acres of as fine land as could be found anywhere. As that was strictly an agricultural district, it was his aim to bring his farm into a higher state of cultivation and make it more productive each year. The principle products of the country at that time were corn and hogs, and as there were no railroads, Cincinnati was the only available market, and all the marketable stock of the country had to be driven, and all grain sold, hauled to that point. About this time, the White Water Canal was constructed, from Lawrenceburg to Connersville, which furnished some transportation facilities for the surplus grain produced in that region. On this farm his wife died on January 5, 1841, her death being preceded a few weeks by that of an infant daughter. In 1843 he married Abigail Lindley, who was to him a good wife, and to his children a good step-mother. Four of his children having gone to make homes of their own, in 1853 he sold his farm and bought a smaller place near Fayetteville, in the western part of Fayette County, Indiana, where he lived until his death.

"During his lifetime, he had divided, equally, his means with his children, as they attained their majority, retaining sufficient to guarantee the comforts of life to himself and wife in their old age. The settlement of his estate was made by his son, Isreal, as executor. His early religious views were those entertained by the people of those days called New Lights or Christians. Some years after locating in Rush County, he became a member of what was called Little Flat Rock Christian Church, where he joined with John P. Thompson and Benj. F. Reeve as Elders of that Congregation, which position he occupied until his removal to Fayetteville to which place he transferred his membership and was then chosen an elder, which position he was filling at the time of his death. He was in his day and time a close Bible student. Politically, he was what has been called a Jeffersonian democrat, and these views were entertained by him at the time of his death.

"Death came to Daniel Long while he was visiting his children at Indianapolis. While on this visit, he attended the State fair and was near a portable saw mill that was making a trial exhibition when the boiler exploded, instantly killing him and some fifteen others. He was taken to his home at Fayetteville and afterward buried by the side of his former wife in the cemetery at Little Flat Rock Church. His funeral was preached by John P. Thompson and Benj. F. Reeve, with whom he had been so long and so closely associated in his church work. His second wife remained at the home at the home at Fayetteville for a number of years after his death. When she sold her interest in the farm and removed to Vevay, Ind., she made her home with a sister where she died.”

Biographical sketches were written by Dr. Hornaday for each of the children of Daniel and Rachel (Sparks) Long who reached adulthood, but space does not permit their inclusion here. Their children were:

7.1.4.1 Isaac Sparks Long, born August 14, 1821, died June 5, 1893; he married Sarah V. Smith on November 23, 1843.
7.1.4.2 Jacob Long, born September 30, 1823, died October 9, 1825.
7.1.4.3 William P. Long, born December 10, 1825, died January 30, 1912; he married Sarah D. Reeve, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Reeve, on February 24, 1848. She was born in Mason Co., Ky., October 22, 1829 and died April 4, 1895. It was their daughter, 7.1.4.3.x Elizabeth A. Long, who married Dr. Hornaday who compiled the genealogical record of this family.
7.1.4.4 Alfred J. Long, born September 23, 1828, died September 9, 1884.
7.1.4.5 Rhoda Long, born September 27, 1830, died September 25, 1897; she married John Spivey on May 16, 1850.
7.1.4.6 Isreal Long, born June 18, 1823; he married Jane Morrison.
7.1.4.7 Martin V. Long, born December 30, 1635, died July 6, 1854.
7.1.4.8 Susan A. Long, born July 4, 1840, died Nov7, 1840.

7.1.5 Nancy Sparks was born October 2, 1800. Dr. Hornaday states in his genealogical record that "Nancy married Tunis Cox and lived in Hamilton Co., Ohio, where they raised a large family of children and where she died.” Several years ago, a great-greatgranddaughter of Nancy Sparks, Mrs. David Gibbs of Holton, Indiana, sent us rather full information regarding Nancy and her family which we published in the September 1968 issue of the Quarterly (Whole No. 63, pp. 1167-1169).

Nancy Sparks (often called Anna as a nickname) married Tunis Cock on November 2, 1820, in Hamilton County, Ohio. The spelling of the name was gradually changed from "Cock” to "Cox”. She died on June 7, 1841. The children of Tunis and Nancy (Sparks) Cox were:
7.1.5.1 William Cox, born October 7, 1821.
7.1.5.2 Thompson Cox, born November 29, 1822; he married Susan Patterson in 1844.
7.1.5.3 Mary Ann Cox, born June 21, 1824; she married Nicholas Goshorn (?).
7.1.5.4 Sally Cox, born December 6, 1825; married a Titus.
7.1.5.5 Gresham Cox, born March 18, 1827.
7.1.5.6 Andrew Jackson Cox, born 6 February 1829.
7.1.5.7 Elizabeth Cox, born December 12, 1830.
7.1.5.8 Isaac Cox, born March 17, 1832.
7.1.5.9 Martha Jane Cox, born September 1, 1834.
7.1.5.10 Harriet Cox, born January 8, 1836, died June 25, 1868; she married Alexander Dom, Sr.
7.1.5.11 George Washington Cox, born December 27, 1837; he married (first) Rebecca Ayres in 1858; he married (second) Mrs. Martin (Hole) Smith in 1868.
7.1.5.12 Catherine Cox, born June 5, 1839.
7.1.6 John Sparks was born October 8, 1802. Dr. Hornaday indicated in his genealogical record that he had no information on this son, though he knew that he had married. John was not mentioned in his father's will, which is probably an indication he had died prior to that date (July 15, 1834). Isaac Sparks willed a lot that he owned in Mount Pleasant to a grandson whom he called "Eria Sparks,” adding that "if he does not survive, then to Martha Sparks, his sister.” Perhaps these were children of his son, John.

7.1.7 Isaac Sparks, Jr. was born September 25, 1805. Dr. Hornaday wrote as follows regarding this son: "Isaac Jr. married and raised quite a family of children; died in Hamilton Co., Ohio, near where he was born.” This son is listed as "Isaac Sparks, Jr.” on the 1830 census of Colerain Township, Hamilton County, Ohio - - his name immediately follows that of his father on the census list. His household consisted of one female between 20 and 30 years (no doubt his wife) and two boys, one between 5 and 10 years, and the other under 10 years of age. In the Hamilton County marriage records, there is a record of the marriage of Isaac Sparks and Sarah Leggett, dated April 18, 1826. However, when the 1850 census was taken, when all members of each household were listed by name, Isaac's wife's name appeared as Rebecca. Her (Rebecca's) age was given as 39, thus she was born ca. 1811. The ages of the children of Isaac Sparks, Jr., as listed on the 1850 census, would suggest two families - - thus it seems probable that he was married twice. As named on the 1850 census, his children were:

7.1.7.1 Alford Sparks, born ca. 1831.
7.1.7.2 Elizabeth Sparks, born ca. 1832.
7.1.7.3 Ermaley Sparks (female), born ca. 1834.
7.1.7.4 Sarah Sparks, born ca. 1842.
7.1.7.5 William Sparks, born ca. 1843.
7.1.7.6 Andrew Sparks, born ca. 1846.
7.1.7.7 Edward Sparks, born ca. 1847.
7.1.7.8 Roda Sparks, born ca. 1850.
7.1.8 Thompson Sparks was born December 1, 1808. Dr. Hornaday wrote of him in 1905: "Thompson married Lucy Head. They had one child, 7.1.8.1 Francis Sparks by name. He died in 1833 of cholera in Hamilton Co., Ohio.” Mrs. R. B. Eagleston, a great-great-granddaughter of Thompson Sparks, furnished information on this branch of the family which we published in the Quarterly of September 1966 (Whole No. 55, p. 1010).
Thompson Sparks died on November 14, 1833, in Rush County, Indiana. He had married Lucy Jane Head there the year before, on 2 February 1832. She was born December 29, 1810, and lived until February 25, 1880. Their only child., 7.1.8.1 Francis M. Sparks, was born December 12, 1832, and died on June 28, 1910. Additional information appears in the issue of the Quarterly cited above.

7.1.9 Sally Sparks was born December 28, 1810. Dr. Hornaday merely stated in the account of the family that he wrote in 1905 that "Sally was married and died in Hamilton Co., Ohio, near the place of her birth.” We know from her father's will that she was living in 1834 and that she married a man named Legget, for he called her by that name.

7.1.10 Rhoda Sparks was born November 5, 1816. Dr. Hornaday's note on her reads: "Rhoda died in her girlhood days and was buried in Hamilton Co., Ohio.” There is a stone in the McCrea Cemetery at College Hill in Hamilton County which gives her death as November 1, 1825. Rhoda was nine years old. Her mother, Sarah (Hankins) Sparks died six weeks later, on December 17, 1825.

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