February 18, 2004

Pages 823
Whole Number 46

THE SERVICE OF THOMAS SPARKS
OF ALABAMA AND ARKANSAS
IN THE WAR WITH THE CREEK INDIANS IN 1836



On 5 January 1852, Thomas Sparks, a resident of Conway County, Arkansas, appeared before a justice of the peace named Lewis W. Porter to make application for bounty land on the basis of his service in the War with the Creek Indians in 1836. He stated that he was 37 years old; that he had been a private in Capt. James McAdorg’s company in a regiment of mounted volunteers comnanded by Col. L. G. McMillen; and that he was mustered into service on June 19, 1836, for the term of three months or until the war’ ended. He stated that he actually served for 33 days and was honorably discharged at Montgomery, Alabama, on July 21, 1836. He signed his name in a clear hand as "Thomas Sparks". He submitted his discharge along with his application; it was signed by Capt. James McAdory. Records in Washington proved he had entered service on June 12, 1836. His application was approved and he was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On April 16, 1855, Thomas Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the Congressional act of March 3, 1855. He was still a resident of Conway County, Arkansas, and was now aged 38. He gave essentially the same information about his service as in 1852, except to note that he bad entered service at Montgomery, Alabama. He again signed his name as "Thomas Sparks." J. W. Willbank and R. S. Cargill, both of Conway County, Arkansas, signed as witnesses. His application was approved and Thomas Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land. (Bounty Land Warrant File 46 414-120-55.)

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