October 26, 2017

Pages 1046-1047
Whole Number 57

INDEX TO SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812



Page Number 496-504
Whole Number 31

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

The officers of The Sparks Family Association have obtained on film from the National Archives in Washington copies of the applications for bounty land and pensions by soldiers named Sparks who served in the War of 1812. These records do not pertain to the granting of bounty land immediately following the War, which was apparently done on a rather informal basis, but rather those grants which were provided for by acts passed by Congress on September 28, 1850, and on March 3, 1855. Close to one hundred different Sparks are represented in these files. Unfortunately, most of them do not contain the details regarding family connections which the Revolutionary War applications contain, but nevertheless, they are of genealogical and historical value.

It has seemed impractical to attempt to print these documents in full, since they would fill a great many pages of close typing. We shall, therefore, present abstracts of these papers. In these abstracts we shall attempt to include all data of interest to descendants. They will be printed in alphabetical order over several issues of the Quarterly.

AARON SPARKS, of Camden, New Jersey, died September 4, 1856. Elizabeth Sparks, widow of Aaron Sparks. Pension File WC 6410.

On October 29, 1874, Elizabeth Sparks, aged 78, a resident of Camden City, Camden County, N.J., applied for a widow's pension. She stated that she was the widow of Aaron Sparks who had enlisted 'in lieu of a drafted man' in Capt. Sander's Company of the New Jersey Militia. (Official records gave his service as from September 27, 1814 to December 27, 1814.) She stated that her husband had received a bounty land warrant No. 35,763 dated July 30, 1856, for 160 acres of land for his service. She stated that her maiden name had been Elizabeth Applin and that she had been married to Aaron Sparks on September 19, 1813, by John Nichols, Esq., at Sharptown, Salem County, N .J., and that her husband had died at Camden., N .J., on Sept 4, 1856. She signed the application as 'Elizabeth Sparks' and it was witnessed by J. C. Lacour and O. W. Spond.

On November 16, 1874, John W. Carter, aged 80, of Camden, N.J., swore that he was personally acquainted with Aaron Sparks. 'I well remember his marriage to his present widow Elizabeth Sparks. They were married sometime in 1813, at Sharptown. My brother was at the wedding, I remember very distinctly. I afterward knew the said Aaron Sparks and Elizabeth lived together as man and wife until the day of his death and had a number of children between them. Much of the time we were neighbors.'

On November 18, 1874, Daniel Taylor, aged 86 years, swore that he had known Aaron and Elizabeth Sparks since the year 1816. 'I bought property of them and they both acknowledged the deed as husband and wife, they had one child at that time.' He added that he had seen Elizabeth Sparks "six weeks ago. She was living at Camden City with her son.' On November 20, 1874, Pancoast Roberts swore that he was an undertaker in the city of Camden and that he attended the funeral of Aaron Sparks and buried him on September 6, 1856.

On November 19, 1874, the clerk of Salem County, N.J., copied the record of marriage from Book B, folio 21: 'I John Nichols one of the Justices of the Peace in and for said County [of Salem], do hereby certify that on the 15th day of September 1813 at Sharptown, the County aforesd. I married Aaron Sparks and Elizabeth Applen both of the said [county] of Salem, and them did pronounce Man and Wife agreeable to law.'

Elizabeth Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month.

18.2.1 AARON SPARKS, born ca. 1787, died May 31, 1856, of Baltimore County, Maryland. 18.3.5 Elizabeth Sparks, widow of Aaron Sparks. Pension File WC 21 601.

Elizabeth Sparks, widow of Aaron Sparks, of Baltimore County, Maryland, applied for a widow's pension under the act of 1878 on July 9, 1878. In this application she gave her age as 75 and stated that her husband had served as an Orderly Sergeant in Capt. Edward Orrick's company of the Maryland Militia commanded by Col. Hutchins or Hitchcock; that he was drafted in Baltimore County, Maryland, in the summer of 1814 and was discharged that autumn. (Official records give his service as from August 25 to Oct, 1814.) She described her husband at the time be was drafted as about 26 years old, a farmer, born in Baltimore County, 5 feet and 10 inches tall, with dark hair, grey eyes, and of medium complexion. She stated that she and her husband were married on April 10, 1831, in Baltimore County by Rev. Geo. Morrison, Minister of the Presbyterian Church. She also stated that her name before her marriage was Elizabeth Sparks; that her husband died May 31, 1856; and that she and her husband had lived near Monkton P.O. in Baltimore County. She stated that her husband had received a land warrant in 1856 'a short time before he died.' She signed her name by mark, which was witnessed by Levi Curtis, aged 77, and by John J. Merryinan, aged 76, both of Monkton.

Another document citing proof of marriage states that Josiah Guuyton, aged 79, of the town of Black Horse, Harford County, Md., was present at the marriage. Josiah Guyton made the following sworn statement on February 19, 1879: 'That he was well acquainted with Aaron Sparks the Husband of Elizabeth Sparks who is an applicant for pension under the act of March 9, 1878, No. 29823 and that he Josiah Guyton was his waiter when be married Elizabeth Sparks and that he has a distinct recollection of engaging a Presbyterian minister by the name of George Morison to mary them, that he went with him to the Village of New Market, Baltimore Co., Md. on the 10 day of April AD 1831 and was present and saw them the said Aaron Sparks and Elizabeth Sparks married by the said George Morrison and what makes him recollect the circumstances more particular was that about the time that Aaron Sparks was about to come out on the floor to be married his nose commenced to bleed which detained him for some minutes before the marriage Ceremony was performed; he also recollects that a lady by the name of Miss Rachel Price waited with him on said couple she having died some years since.'

Another document consists of the sworn statement of Levi Curtis and John J. Merryman dated July 9, 1878: 'We each having known said Applicant and her Husband from Childhood being children together and we eaoh being about the same age of said Applicant Elizabeth Sparks attended school with her. We knew them prior and after marriage and have every reason to believe that they were lawfully married as they lived together as Man and wife until the death of said Aaron Sparks. I Levi Curtis attended the Marriage feast at said Aaron Sparks Home on the day he married said Elizabeth Sparks.'

Another document consists of a sworn statement dated March 1, 1879, by Lewis Parsons, aged 59, and William H. F. Anderson, aged 56, who stated that they had known Aaron and Elizabeth Sparks for over 38 years and that 'on the 31st day of May 1856 Aaron Sparks the husband of said Claimant died and that they dressed him for burial.'

On July 9, 1878, Levi Curtis and John J. Merryman swore they had known Aaron Sparks and had lived on adjoining farms, and that 'we each were present at the funeral of said Aaron Sparks and saw him buried at St. James Church near Mockton.'

Elizabeth Sparks' s pension amounted to $8.00 per month. In 1885 the Pension Office sent an inquiry to the post master at Monkton Mills, Md., to determine whether Elizabeth Sparks was still living. The postmaster replied on May 19 that she 'has been dead 1 year 1st July.' Another record gives her death date as May 31, 1856.

(Editor's Note: See the Quarterly of June, 1958 (Vol. VI, No. 2),p. 296 for information on the ancestry and family of Aaron and Elizabeth (Sparks) Sparks. Aaron and Elizabeth were first cousins.)

AARON SPARKS, born ca. 1790, of Killingly, Connecticut. Frances Sparks, widow of Aaron Sparks. Pension File NW Priv. 138.

On January 20, 1822, Fanny Sparks of the town of Killingly, Windham County, Conn., made an application for a pension in which she made the following statement: 'On the 6th day of November AD 1812, she was lawfully married to Aaron Sparks of said Town [Killingly] by Anthony Brown Esquire a justice of the Peace in said Town & for said County whose certificate of marriage is hereto annexed, that she lived with said Sparks but a few days when be left her, that he was soon afterwards seen as she was told in Providence in the State of Rhode Island where he declared that he had enlisted and was going to sea in the Privatier Blockade fitting out in the Town of Bristol in the State of Rhode Island & that she hath never heard of him since nor does she know of any person who can give any account of him further except from some persons in sd Town of Bristol who inform her that Aaron Sparks of Killingly in Connecticut afterward sailed from Bristol in the Privateer Blockade and has not been heard from since & that she really believes & it is generally believed that said Aaron Sparks her husband perished on board said Privateer; that she has had one child by said Sparks since her marriage to him aged about nine years & named Aaron, that she has not been married to any person except said Sparks and is now his widow.' Fanny Sparks signed the above statement by mark.

On the same date the following statement was signed by John Dixon, Harvey Day, John Eaton, James Herndell and William Herndell, all of Killingly: 'that we knew Aaron Sparks of Killingly and that it was allways understood that he was lawfully married to Fanny Knight of Killingly afd now Fanny Sparks and widow of said Aaron Sparks, that said Aaron Sparks soon after their intermarriage went away from said Fanny, & it was reported & believed be went to sea & has not been heard from since & we believe he is dead--that Said Fanny is a person of truth & veracity & that full faith may be given to her oath & that we have no interest whatever in. the claims of the said Fanny on the United States in consequence of the death of her husband on the Privateer Blockade of Bristol. . . and we further testify that we have never known any other man of the Town of Killingly of the name of Aaron Sparks except the one we have mentioned & who married Fanny Knight.'

Also included in the file of papers is a copy of the marriage record: 'Windham County 58 Killingly November 6 A.D. 1812, then Aaron Sparks of said Killingly and Fanna Knight of Plainfield in said county were joined in Marriage by me--Anthony Brown, Justice of Peace.' There is also a copy of the birth record of Fanny's child taken from the records of the Town Clerk: 'Aaron Sparks Jr son of Aaron & Frances Sparks was born March 6, 1813.'

The application of Fanny Sparks was approved and she was placed on the pension roll as of September 1, 1813, to receive $3.00 per month.

(Editor's note: Shortly after Submitting this application for a pension, Fanny Sparks married Simeon Spaulding--on February 10, 1822 (Killingly Vital Records, Vol. 1, Po 193.)

BARZILLA SPARKS, (also spelled Bazilla and Bazil), born ca. 1780, died April 13, 1848, of Baltimore, Maryland. Sarah Ann Sparks, widow of Barzilla Sparks. Bounty Land Warrant File 16 503-120-55.

There are two files of papers pertaining Barzilla Sparks and his widow, one under the spelling 'Barzilla' and the other under the spelling 'Bazilla.' They belong together.

Sarah Ann Sparks, widow of Barzilla Sparks, first applied for bounty land on the basis of her husband's service on June 1, 1852, at which time she received 40 acres. In 1855 she applied again and received 160 acres. There was some delay following her first application until her husband's service could be established. It was finally determined that he had served from April 14 to 18, 1814, in Capt. Week's Company of Kent County, Md., Militia, and again from July 10 to September 23, 1814.

In her first application, dated June 1, 1852, Sarah Ann Sparks stated that she was 73 years old and a resident of Gallia County, Ohio. She was able to give little information about her husband's service, but in a later statement, which will be quoted below, she provided many details. She stated that she and Bazilla Sparks had been married in Kent County, Md., in March, 1823, by a Minister of the Gospel and that her husband had died at Baltimore, Md., on April 13, 1848. She signed her name by mark.

Included with her application, Sarah Ann submitted a sworn statement by the County Clerk of Kent County, Md.: 'I hereby Certify that Bazil [sic] Sparks and Sarah Ann Gudgeon of the County aforesaid applied for, and obtained a Marriage License from the Clerk of Kent County on the twelfth day of March in the year One Thousand eight hundred and twenty three, directed to the Rev. Thomas Dodson.'

On June 26, 1852, William Gudgeon and William A. Gudgeon, apparently a brother and a nephew of Sarah Ann, residents of Hamilton County, Ohio, swore they knew Sarah Ann Sparks and her husband, and that William Gudgeon 'was a Sergeant of Pages Co. Myland Militia, and has already Recd Land Warrant No. 2131 (40 acres) for his Service. He knew Sparks in Weeks Co. Myland Militia, who served at Same time with deponent.'

On May 4, 1853, Sarah Ann Sparks signed a more detailed application for bounty land. She was then a resident of Gallia County, Obio, aged 74 years, declaring that 'she is the widow of Barzilla Sparks, who was a soldier in a Rifle Company commanded by Capt. Chambers or Capt Weaks, in a Regt of Maryland militia commanded a part of the time by Col. Weeks in Genl. Reed's Brigade in the war declared by the United States against Great Britain on the 18th June 1812. That the said Bar'zilla Sparks in the fall of 1812 when the enemy was engaged in attacking all assailable points on the Atlantic board and tributary streams and being present in the Chesapeake bay, a Rifle company to which the said Barzilla was a member was called out by the Col of the Kent County militia, in obedience to orders from Major Genl. Smith as she believes, to repel an expected invasion of the American soil, that Capt. Chambers as she thinks marched said Company to the Chesapeake bay where they were stationed until the enemy sailed down the Bay again, at which time a portion of the Volenteer companies were permitted to return home, and soon to return so that others could also return home to remain a few days and return again, which rotation of service continued until the enemy went into winter quarters. And again when Spring opened and the enemy seemed determined to attack all assailable points again, Capt Chambers Company was ordered out again, and compelled to do military duty as long as the enemy was present, and in that way alternating service and returning home to labour and procure clothing, for some three years as her said husband always stated, which so continued him in actual service, some two years. He was honorably discharged as he always stated but she never saw or heard of a discharge; but he was with the said Rifle company honorably discharged at the point of rendezvooing, when the main service was performed. She says she cannot postively state the various officers be was under, but thinks it was Capts Chambers or Weeks at the start, and that the same Weeks was promoted to a Colonelship over said Militia force. She also states that she married Barzilla Sparks at Kent County, Md., on the 16th Day of March 1823 by a Clergyman, whose name she thinks was Reed, but her name before said marriage was Sarah Ann Gudgeon. That the said Barzilla Sparks died the 13th March 1847 aged fifty eight years, that she was a widow on the 28th September 1850, and is still a widow at the date of this declaration. . ."

Sarah Ann Sparks signed this declaration by mark. Attached to this statement is another signed by William Bennett, a Notary Public, dated May 4, 1853, in which he stated that he had examined Barzilla Sparks's family Bible, and copied the following entries: 'Barzilla Sparks and Sarah Ann Gudgeon was married the sixteenth day of March one thousand eight hundred and twenty three. Barzilla Sparks died 13th March 1847.'

On March 29, 1855, Sarah Ann Sparks, then a resident of Campbell County, Kentucky, aged 75, made application for additional bounty land under the new law of 1855. She gave no information in this application other than what has been quoted above.

9.1.1.5 DANIEL P. SPARKS, born 1784, died October 13, 1867, of Louisiana. Maliza Vinson Sparks, widow of Daniel P. Sparks. Bounty Land Warrant File 19 873-160-12; Pension File WC 24 261.

Some of the papers in this file have apparently been lost. There is no application for bounty land by Daniel P. Sparks, but apparently sometime prior to his death in 1867 he received 160 acres. To support his application, he sent his discharge which is still in the file and reads as follows: 'To all whom it may concern: KNOW YE, That Daniel Sparks a Corporal of Captain George Birch's Company Seventh regiment of Infantry who was enlisted the twenty second day of June one thousand eight hundred and twelve to serve Five Years is hereby honorably discharged from the army of the United States by reason of the expiration of his term of enlistment. Said Daniel Sparks was born in [blank] in the state of Virginia, is thirty three years of age, five feet eight inches high, dark complexion, dark eyes, dark hair, and by occupation, when enlisted, a Carpenter. Given at Camp Montgomery this twenty first day of June 1817.' The signature of the commander is nearly illegible, but his last name appears to have been Arbuckle.

On May 17, 1878, the widow of Daniel P. Sparks applied for a pension. She was a resident of Houston, in Harris County, Texas, at the time of application. She stated that her husband had volunteered at Savanah, Ga., and that while in service 'he recd. hip wound and was laid up in hospital at Savannah, Ga.' She stated that her maiden name had been Maliza Vinson and that she and Daniel P. Sparks bad been married on June 29, 1841, by Rev. B. Roberts at Franklin, La., and that her husband had died at New Orleans, La., on October 13, 1867. Maliza signed her name in a clear hand. The witnesses to her application were Charles B. Sojourner and Martha L. Sojourner of Houston.

On June 17, 1878, W. P. Allen, aged 71, and Wilson McKerall, aged 65, of St. Mary Parish, La., testified they had known the claimant and her husband 'for the last 40 years.' On October 7, 1878, M. L. Sojourner, aged 50, and E. Hughes, aged 28, of Houston, stated they had known the claimant and her husband for the last 15 years.

On April 16, 1879, the Adjutant General's Office reported on the service of Daniel P. Sparks, stating that he had enlisted on June 22, 1812, at Augusta, Ga., for 5 years and that the record of his enlistment described him as: '5 ft. 8 in. high, black eyes, dark hair, dark complexion, 28 years old. Occupation, Carpenter, born in Moore, S.C., enlisted by Capt. Twiggs.' The record in the Adjutant General's Office gave his service as follows: 'The records of Capt. Farrars Co. 8th U.S. Infty. report him a Corpl. present Feby. 16th, 28th, April 30 & June 30, 1815. Capt. Machesney 7th Infty. repts. him present November 30 & December 31, 1815, Feby. 29, April 30 & August 31/16. Capt. Birch reports him present December 31/16, Feby. 28 and Apl. 30, 1817 and discharged June 21, 1817.'

On May 22, 1879, Maliza's application was approved and she received a pension of $8.00 per month beginning March 9, 1878.

(Editor's note: Although Virginia was given as Daniel's birth place on his discharge paper, the record of the Adjutant General's Office, which gives his place of birth as Moore, S.C., is probably correct. Moore is located in Spartanburg County, S.C. We have records of a Sparks family living in that area, but we have not been able to fit Daniel into the family.)

DAVID SPARKS, born 1794, of Morgan County, Ga., and Talladega County, Ala. Bounty Land Warrant File 22 513-80-55.

On November 1, 1850, David Sparks, aged 56 years, applied for bounty land under the act of 1850. At the time of his application he was a resident of Talladega County, Ala. He stated that he had been a private in a volunteer rifle company commanded by Capt. H. Lane in the Volunteer Georgia Rifle Battalion commanded by Col. Jones in the War of 1812; that he had volunteered in Morgan Co., Ga., on or about November 1, 1814 for 6 months and was honorably discharged at Ft. Hawkins, Ga., on or about May 1, 1815; he did not receive a written discharge. He signed his application by mark. He was granted 80 acres of bounty land.

David Sparks obtained a sworn statement regarding his service by his former captain, Henry Lane. Lane was living in Newton County, Ga., when he made this declaration on August 24, 1850. He gave essentially the same information as had David Sparks in his application.

On April 3, 1855, David Sparks applied for additional bounty land in accordance with the act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 61 and was still a resident of Talladega County, Ala. He gave essentially the same information about his service as he had in 1850. He signed by mark. The witnesses to this application were John B. Kidd and John C. Smith ot Talladega County. David Sparks apparently received 160 acres of additional bounty land.

(Editor's note: David Sparks appears on the 1850 census of Talladega County, Ala. (see page 378 of the March, 1959, issue of the Quarterly). He gave his age as 56 in 1850 and his birthplace as North Carolina. His wife's name was Milly, age 59, born in South Carolina. Living with him was Abel Sparks, probably a son, aged 22, born in Georgia; also a 16-year-old girl named Matilda Rice, born in Georgia. In his application, David Sparks stated that he had enlisted in Morgan County, Ga., in 1814. Our only record of him in Morgan County is in the 1820 census. He and his wife were listed as between 26 and 45 years of age, with two males under 10 and one female under 10. He was not listed in the Morgan County census of 1830 but was probably the David Sparks listed on the 1830 census of Campbell County, Ga. He and his wife were listed there as between 30 and 40, with 2 males between 10 and 15, one male under 5, 1 female between 10 and 15, and 2 females between 5 and 10.)

1.2.1.2.2.6.1 ELSBERRY SPARKS (also called Berry Sparks), born 1793-94, of Shawney Town, IL., Sebastian County, Ark.,and Johnson County, Texas. Bounty Land Warrant File 65 930-40-50 and 59 237-160-55.

The papers pertaining to Elsberry (or Berry) Sparks are in two separate files because his application of 1852 was made under the name Elsberry Sparks while in 1855 he signed his name as Berry Sparks.

He made his first application on April 20, 1852, at which time he was a resident of Sebastian County, Arkansas. He gave his age as 58 and stated that he had been a private in Capt. Trounsdale's company in the First Illinois Militial Regt. of Infantry commanded by Col. Philip Trammel]. in the 'War of 1812 with the Northern Indians;' that he was drafted 'at or near Shawney town, Illinois' on or about the first day of September , 1813, for 6 months and served about 4 months; that he was honorably discharged at Shawney town on or about January 1, 1814. He also stated that his discharge had been lost. He signed his name as Elsberry Sparks.

In a note made by the Pension Office, it was stated that 'Berry Sparks' was on record as having served in Capt. Trusdale's company from September 5 to November 20, 1812. He was granted 40 acres.

On August 13, 1855, he again applied for bounty land under the new law. At this time he was a resident of Johnson County, Texas. He gave his age as 62 years. He gave essentially the same information regarding his service as he had in 1852, except that he was mustered into service at the 'Saline or Salt works in the Territory of the now State of Illinois in September 1812 and marched to Fort Edwards where be joined the main Army;' that he was drafted for 3 months and served 2 months and was discharged at 'the Saline or Salt works . . .on account of a treaty being made with said Indians.' He signed his name as Berry Sparks. Willis Sparks and T. G. Soranoe, residents of Johnson County, Texas, signed as witnesses, the former by mark. It appears that he was granted 160 acres of bounty land in 1855.

(Editor's note: Elsberry (Berry) Sparks was probably the son of 1.2.1.2.2.6 Absolom Sparks, who was a son of 1.2.1.2.2 Matthew and Sarah Sparks (see the Quarterly of Dec, 1956, Vol. IV No. 4, pp. 177-78, [Whole No. 16] for material on the elder Matthew Sparks.) In the will of Benjamin Elsberry, dated August 21, 1789, probated August 29, 1792, in Wilkes County, Ga., provision was made for Benjamin's wife and at her death his estate was to be divided 'between all my daughters.' When the estate was settled in 1808, 1.2.1.2.2.6 Absolom Sparks and 1.2.1.2.2.8 Nathan Sparks, both sons of 1.2.1.2.2 Matthew and Sarah, received 'their part in full.' Without doubt, this means that Absolom and Nathan had married daughters of Benjamin Elsberry. The marriage record of Nathan Sparks to Sally Elsberry, dated May 10, 1800, is on file in Oglethorpe County, Ga., but that of Absolom has not been found. There seems little doubt that Elsberry (Berry) Sparks was a son of Absolom, because both Absolom and Elsberry were in Miller County, Ark., betweón 1821 and 1825. In 1821 a petition was drawn up by a group of citizens of 'Post Arkansas, Arkansas Territory,' who were concerned about the treaty of the United States with the chiefs of the Choctaw Nation of Indians. Among the signers were Benjamin Sparks, Berry Sparks, Mat. Sparks, and Absolem Sparks. (Benjamin, Berry, and Mat, were probably all sons of Absolom.) Another petition was drawn up by a group of settlers in Miller County, Ark., in 1825 protesting that part of the county in which they owned 'farms and improvements we have laboured for years to make' had been ceded to the to the Choctaw Indians. Among the signers were Absolom Sparks, Absolom Sparks Jnr., Elsberry Sparks, Mathew Sparks, and Wilobe Sparks; see Territorial Papers of the United States, ed. by Clarence Edwin Carter, Vol. XIX, Arkansas Territory, 1819-1825, pp. 140-141.

Elsberry (Berry) Sparks was living in Sevier County, Ark., in 1830; on the census of that year his family was listed as follows: Himself, aged 30 to 40; his wife, also between 30 and 40; 1 male 15 to 20; 2 males under 5; 1 female 15 to 20; 1 female 10 to 15; 2 females 5 to 10; and 1 female under 5.)

1.2.1.2.2.1.4 ENOCH SPARKS, born September , 1791, of Franklin County, Alabama. Bounty Land Warrant File 22 360-80-55.

On November 20, 1850, Enoch Sparks made application for bounty land. He was a resident of Franklin County, Ala., and gave his age as 58 years. He swore that he had been a soldier in the company commanded by Capt. John Hedge in the First Regt. of Volunteers commanded by Col. Reuben Nash; that he volunteered in Greenville District of South Carolina about October 19 1812, for 6 months and was mustered into service about 1 January 1814; that he was honorably discharged at the end of 6 months at Washington, Ga, on July 20, 1814. He signed his name as Enoch Sparks. He was granted 80 acres of bounty land.

Submitted with his application was his discharge which reads as follows: 'This is to Certify that Enoch Sparks, Private, having faithfully performed his tour of duty of six months in the service of the United States, he is hereby honorably discharged, with the addition of five days pay Returning home. July 20, 1814 (Signed) John Hodges, Capt.; R. Nash, Lt. Col.'

On April 27, 1855, Enoch Sparks again applied for bounty land. He was still a resident of Franklin County, Ala., and gave his age as '64 years next September .' He described his service as he had in 1850, except that he added that he had sold the 80 acres he had received in 1850 to W. H. Petty. He signed his name as he had in 1850; the witnesses were John Wattress and James H. Tremble. He received 80 acres of land in 1855.

(Editor's Note: Enoch Sparks was a son of 1.2.1.2.2.1 John and Mary (Parmely) Sparks. 1.2.1.2.2.1 John Sparks was born in 1755 and died in 1831 (see the Quarterly of Dec, 1959, Vol. VII, No. 4, p. 433 (misprinted 333) [Whole No. 28 ) and was a son of 1.2.1.2.2 Matthew and Sarah Sparks (see the Quarterly of Dec, 1956, Vol. IV, No. 4, pp. 177-78 [Whole No. 16]). Thus, Enoch Sparks and Elsberry Sparks, whose application for bounty land was given on pages 501-02, were first cousins.)

18.2.3 FRANCIS SPARKS, born May 11, 1792, died November 26, 1867, of Baltimore County, Maryland; BETSEY E. SPARKS, widow of Francis Sparks. Bounty Land Warrant File 50 097-120-55 and Pension File WC 17 211.

On March 29, 1851, Francis Sparks applied for bounty land. He was a resident of Baltimore County, Md., and gave his age as 58 years. He stated that he had been a private in Capt. James Hutchins' company in the 7th Regt. of Maryland Militia commanded by Col. William Jamison in the War of 1812; that he was drafted at Slades Tavern on or about August 3, 1813, for 60 days or 6 months [sic] and marched to Baltimore and was discharged in Baltimore or or about September 10, 1813, without receiving a written discharge. He was also a private in Capt. Orriok's company in the 41st Regt. of Maryland Militia commanded by Col. William Hutchins and he was called out in defence of Baltimore on or about August 24, 1814, and continued in service for about 3 months and was discharged on or about November 18, 1814. He signed his name as 'Frs. Sparks.' He was granted 40 acres under the 1850 law.

On March 19, 1855, he applied for additional bounty land under the act of 1855. He was still a resident of Baltimore County, Md., and gave his age as 62. In this application be referred only to his service under Capt. Edward Orriok. He again signed his name as 'Frs. Sparks.' Robert Morton and Moses Miles, both of Baltimore County, were his witnesses.

The Treasury Dept. reported on January 24, 1852, that Francis Sparks was on record as having served as a private in Capt. James Hutchins' company of Maryland Militia from August 17 to September 16, 1813, and in Capt. Orriok's company from August 25 to October 27, 1814.

On May 11, 1878, Betsey E. Sparks, widow of Francis Sparks, applied for a pension. She was a resident of St. James P.O., Baltimore County, Md., and gave her age as 84. She swore that she was a widow of Francis Sparks who had been drafted in Capt. Edward Orrick's company in the summer of 1814 and had been honorably discharged at Baltimore. She also stated that 'he received two Land Warrants, one prior to the other, Edward Sparks procurred or acted as his Attorney in getting one Land Warrant.' She stated that her maiden name had been Betsey E. Schroder and that she bad been married to Francis Sparks on March 21, 1831, by Rev. John Wiley near St. James Church; and that her husband died November 26, 1867. She signed her name as Betsey E. Sparks. The witnesses to her application were Isaac Standiford, aged 76, of St. James P.O., and Josiah Carling, aged 42, of Black House P.O., Harford County, Md.

On January 17, 1879, Amanda Z. Howard of St. James P.O. testified that she was well acquainted with Betsey E. Sparks, 'that she lived at her father's house for twenty-three years and was present and saw her married on the 15 day of January 1831 by Revd. John Wiley who was rector of St. James Church, Baltimore County, Md. On January 17, 1879, Rev. George K. Warner of St. James Church stated he knew Betsey B. Sparks and that her marriage was recorded in the parish register as she had stated.

On January 24, 1879, her application for a pension was approved in the amount of $8.00 per month, effective as of March 9, 1878. On August 1, 1888, Betsey E. Sparks was dropped from the pension rolls 'because of failure to claim pension.'

(Editor's Note: For information on Francis Sparks see the Quarterly of Dec, 1959, Vol. VII, No. 4, page 439 (misprinted 339) [Whole No. 28] .)

GEORGE SPARKS, born May 16, 1794, died December 30, 1839, of Adams County, Ohio; MARY (DECAMP) SPARKS, born 1806, widow of George Sparks. Bounty Land Warrant File 75 601-120-55.

On May 30, 1851, Mary Sparks, widow of George Sparks, of Adams County, Ohio, applied for bounty land. She gave her age as 51 years. She stated that George Sparks had been a private in Lt. Hayslip's company, Captain John Campbell's battalion of Ohio Cavalry 'in the expeditions commenced by Gen. McArther' in the War of 1812. She stated that George Sparks had volunteered on September 15, 1814, in Adams County, served 3 months and was honorably discharged at Detroit on or about December 15, 1814, but that his certificate of discharge had been lost. She further stated that she and George Sparks had been married in Adams County on August 11, 1823, by one John Patterson, a justice of the peace, and that her maiden name had been Mary Decamp. She stated that her husband had died in Adams County on December 30, 1839, and that she was still his widow. She signed her name as Mary Sparks.

Also on May 30, 1851, J. R. Cookerill, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas of Adams County, Ohio, certified that, according to the marriage records of Adams County, on August 11, 1823, George Sparks procurred a licence to marry Mary Decamp; that, although there was no return of the marriage record made, he knew from personal knowledge that they had been married and 'have raised a large family of children.'

On May 30, 1851, Joseph W. Lafferty of Adams County swore 'that he was acquainted with George Sparks in his lifetime and that he died at said Adams County sometime during the year of our Lord 1839.'

The official record of the service of George Sparks gave his period of enlistment from September 20 to November 19, 1814. Mary Sparks was granted 40 acres of land.

On April 3, 1855, Mary Sparks applied for additional land under the act of 1855. She gave her age as 55 and stated that she was a resident of Adams County, Ohio. She gave essentially the same information as she had in her earlier application, although she added that it was in the town of West Union in Adams County that her husband had volunteered. She signed her name in 1855 as 'My Sparks'--the witnesses to her statements were George Sparks (her son) and C. W. Stevenson.

(Editor's Note: Mary (Decamp) Sparks was born February 20, 1806. George Sparks was born in Penna. on May 16, 1794, and was a son of Salathiel Sparks (1756-1823) who came to Adams County, Ohio, with his family from Washington County, Penna., in 1804. Salathiel's father was George Sparks of Hopewell Township, Washington County, Penna., who died there in 1806. George and Mary (Decamp) Sparks had five children:

John Sparks, born May 27, 1824; Mary Ann Sparks, born March 21, 1827; Salathiel Sparks, born November 20, 1829; George Sparks, born September 29, 1832; and Gracy Jane Sparks, born July 3, 1835.)


Page 525-530
Whole Number 32

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

1.2.5.1.2.9 GEORGE SPARKS, of Wilkes County, North Carolina, and Elliott County, Kentucky; born November 9, 1796, died May 11, 1879. Bounty Land Warrant File 50 353-120-55.

On June 17, 1854, George Sparks made application for bounty land. He was a resident of Carter County, just over the line from Elliott County, Kentucky, and gave his age as 58 years. He stated that he had been a private in Capt. Ambrose CaTton's (or Carlton's) company in a North Carolina regiment; that he was drafted at Wilkesborough, Wilkes County, North Carolina, on November 1, 1814, for 6 months; shortly after being drafted he went with his company to join the Virginia Militia at Norfolk, but when they got to within 3 or 4 miles of Hillsborough, North Carolina, the company was informed that the requisition had been filled and he returned home where he remained until about January 20, 1815, when his company again marched from Wilkesborough to Wadesborough in Anson County, North Carolina, a distance of 270 miles; that he arrived at Wadesborough about February 20, 1815, and he was mustered into service; that on the same day news of the peace arrived and he was honorably discharged at Wadesborough. He remembered that one of the officers was a Major Allen. He also stated he had lost his certificate of discharge. He signed his name as 'George Sparks.' The witnesses were Robert Rose and Abijah Thitt, both of Carter County, Kentucky.

Official records revealed that George Sparks had served under Capt. A. Canton from November 24, to December 8, 1814, and from February 19 to March 9, 1815. On April 7, 1855, George Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the new act. He was still a resident of Carter County, Kentucky, and gave his age as 58 years. He gave no information besides that which he gave in his first application. The witnesses were John B. Whitt and Allen Harper of Carter County.

(Editor's note: This George Sparks was the great-great-grandfather of Paul E. Sparks, President of The Sparks Family Association, He was a son of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks. See page 102 of the Dec, 1955, issue of The Sparks Quarterly (Vol. III, No. 4 [Whole No. 12]) for additional data on George Sparks and his family.)

GEORGE SPARKS, of Hardy County, Virginia, and Licking County, Ohio; born ca. 1777, died 5 February 1868, Bounty Land Warrant File 5 583-80-55.

On November 2, 1850, George Sparks, a resident of Licking County, Ohio, appeared before Jeptha Smith, a justice of the peace, and swore to the statements contained in his application for bounty land. He swore that he was 73 years of age, and that he was the same George Sparks who had served as a private in Capt. David Vanmetre's Company of Virginia Militia commanded by Colonel Boo in the War of 1812. He stated that he had been drafted at Morefield, in Hardy County, Virginia, on or about August 1, 1814, for the term of 6 months and that he had been honorably discharged at Fort Norfolk, Va., on February 19 1815. He further stated 'that never supposing his discharge would be of any use to him, he took no care of it and supposes it is now lost.' He signed his application by mark which was attested by George Buckingham.

Official records revealed that George Sparks had served as a private under Capt. David Vanmetre from July 29, 1814 to January 31, 1815. He was granted 80 acres of bounty land on March 28, 1851 (Warrant No. 2840).

On March 28, 1855, George Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the new law. He stated that he was 78 years old and was a resident of Washington Township, Licking County, Ohio. He gave no information in his second application which had not been included in his first application. The witnesses to his second application were Isaac Schmicker [spe1ling uncertain] and Benjamin Briggs. He was granted an additional 80 acres.

(Editor's note: This George Sparks is buried on a high hill on a private farm near St. Louisville in Licking County, Ohio. The inscription on his tombstone reads: 'George Sparks d. 5 February 1868, in the 96th year of his age.' Nearby is a stone which reads: 'Nancy Sparks, wife of George, d. November 3, 1842, age 67 y. 10 d.' According to a statement in the Old Northwest Genea1ogical Quarterly (Vol. 12, p. 224), George Sparks was a brother of John Sparks who died in Licking County, Ohio, on February 28, 1846, aged 88 years. This John Sparks was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. According to N. N. Hill's History of Licking County, Ohio, published in 1881 (p. 546), John Sparks was born in 1758 "on the south branch of the Potomac River.' This branch flows through Hardy County, West Virginia, where George Sparks lived in 1814, so the account appears to be accurate. John Sparks was nineteen years older than George Sparks-perhaps they were half-brothers. John Sparks never married. George Sparks was living in Washington Township, Licking County, Ohio, as early as 1830--he was listed on the census of that year.

On the 1860 census of Licking County, George Sparks was listed as being 85 years old. Living with him was Jane Sparks, aged 55, who was probably his second wife, and Ann Sparks aged 15, and Cornelia Sparks aged 12. Living next door was John Sparks (aged 40, born in Virginia) who was probaby a son of George.)

GEORGE SPARKS, of Ulster and Seneca Counties, New York; born ca. 1792, died 1864. MARGARET (OSTRANDER) SPARKS, widow of George Sparks. Pension File, WC 11 487.

On April 26, 1878, Margaret Sparks applied for a pension under the Act of March 9, 1878. She stated that she was a resident of West Junius, Seneca County, New 4. York; that she was 81 years old, and was the widow of George Sparks who had been a private in the company of Captain Deyo in a regiment of New York Militia commanded by Cob. Hadenburgh in the War of 1812; that he volunteered at Newburgh, New York, in the autunni of 1813 or 1814, and served between 2 or 3 months and received an honorable discharge. She described her husband at the time of his enlistment as about 21 years old, a weaver by occupation, born in Plattekill, Ulster County, New York, 5 feet and 10 inches tall, with brown hair, blue eyes, and a fair complexion. She stated that she had been married to George Sparks at Plattekill on February 8, 1817, by the Rev. Mr. Perkins; that her maiden name had been Margaret Ostrander, and that neither she nor her husband had been previously married. She stated that George Sparks had died at Phelps, New York, on May 3, 1864; that she and her husband had lived at Plattekill, New York, from the time of their marriage until 1836 when they moved to Phelps, New York. She added that 'by reason of old age being very feeble she is unable to go before a clerk of court to be sworn so asked to be sworn by a Justice or Notary.' She signed her application as 'Margaret Sparks.' Her application was witnessed by Emily Fineback, aged 38, and Charlotte Philips, aged 70.

On June 25, 1878, Hiram Musselman and Jane Musselman of West Junius, Seneca County, New York, aged 66 and 60 years respectively, swore that they knew George and Margaret Sparks in their lifetime and stated that George Sparks had died on May 3, 1864. On July 15, 1878, Jesse T. Conkling and Elizabeth Conkling of Shawangunk, Ulster County, New York, swore that they were 86 and 74 years old respectively and that they had known George and Margaret Sparks as early as 1817. Elizabeth Conkling stated she had been present at the wedding of George and Margaret Sparks which took place at Plattekill, Ulster County, New York, and that the ceremony was performed by the Rev. Aaron Perkins, a Baptist minister, and that Margaret's maiden name was Ostrander. They added that they had known George and Margaret Sparks all their married lives.

War Department records revealed that George Sparks served as a private in Capt. J. Deyo's company from September 8, 1813, to November 9, 1813, a total of 63 days. Margaret Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month commencing March 9, 1878.

HENRY SPARKS, of Salem County, New Jersey, and Crawford County, Penn.; born ca. 1791. Bounty Land Warrant File 18 007-80-55 and Pension File SC 16 917.

On July 27, 1853, Henry Sparks, aged 62 years, of Evansburgh, Crawford County, Pennsylvia, applied for bounty land. He stated that he had been a private in a company in the 117th Regiment of Militia commanded by Major Potter; that he had entered the service as a substitute for one Adams at Roadstown or Smithsborough, Salem County, New Jersey on or about April 9, 1813, for 6 months and was honorably discharged at Salem in Salem County on or about September 10, 1813; that he was later drafted at Bridgetown, Salem County, in September 1814, for 6 months and was commanded by Capt. Peter Souder and Col. Joshua Howell; that he was discharged about December 25, 1814; that during the last term of service he was sick for two months with camp fever. He signed the application as 'Henry Sparks.'

According to official records, Henry Sparks served in Capt. Bilderback's Company from May 24 to September 30, 1813, and in Capt. Peter Souder's Company, New Jersey Militia from September 27 to December 21, 1814. He was granted 80 acres of bounty land.

On April 26, 1855, Henry Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 63 and his residence as Crawford County, Penna.

Henry Sparks gave no information in 1855 that he had not given in his earlier application. He again signed the application as 'Henry Sparks'. John Lynn and William Chapman, both of Crawford County, witnessed his application. He was granted another 80 acres of bounty land.

On April 14, 1871, Henry Sparks applied for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. He stated that he was a resident of Evansburgh, Crawford County, Penna., and was 79 years old. He stated that his wife had died in March, 1859. He did not state her name, but said he had married her in Pittsburgh, Penna., on March 10, 1811. He stated that he had been drafted at Penns Neck, Salem County, New Jersey, in the summer of 1813. He added that 'he served as a Private in said service' and that 'he first saw duty at Port Elizabeth, N.J., as guard for about one month, was then marched to Cold Spring down on the Cape--where we were held as guard about six months--was drafted again the next year and was at Billingsport, N.J., all summer.' His signature was was witnessed by Robert Scott and A. R. Stewart. He was granted a pension of $8.00 per month.

On April 24, 1883, the Dept. of the Interior inquired of the postmaster at Evansburgh if Henry Sparks were still living. There is no reply among the papers.

HENRY W. SPARKS, of Killingly, Windham County, Connecticut; born ca. 1792, died 1886, Land Warrant File 36 259-160-55 and Pension File SC 23 696.

On June 5, 1855 Henry W. Sparks of Killingly, Windham County, Conn., applied for bounty land for the first time. He stated that he was 62 years old and that he had been a private in Capt. Solomon Sykes's company in the 11th Regiment of Conn. Militia commanded by Zepheniah Williams; that he had been drafted at New London, Conn., on or about June 25, 1813, and served 16 days and was honorably discharged at New London. He signed the application as 'Henry W. Sparks'; his application was witnessed by Henry Sparks (probably a son of Henry L.) and Lydia A. Sparks. He was granted 160 acres of bounty land after it was determined from official records that he had served in Capt. Sykes's company from June 21 to July 15, 1813.

On May 13, 1878, Henry W. Sparks applied for a pension under the act of March 9, 1878. He was 85 years old, still a resident of Killingly, Conn. He stated in this application that his service had extended from June 10 to July 12, 1813. He also stated that he had always resided in Killingly. He gave his description at the time of his service as follows: '21 years of age, born at said Killingly, height about 6 feet, hair black, eyes dark, complexion light.' He signed as 'Henry W. Sparks'; the witnesses were Henry Sparks, aged 65, and Ezekiel R. Bunlingame, aged 47, both of Killingly.

Henry W. Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month. In 1887 the Pension Office made inquiry and found that he had died in 1886. On May 15, 1887, Edith L. Aldrich of East Killingly, Conn., aged 21, school teacher, stated that Henry W. Sparks had been her great-uncle and that he had died in Oct, 1886, she thought on October 22, and that he was 94 years old when he died. Also on May 15, 1887, James K. Logue (?), aged 70, baker, stated that Henry W. Sparks had been his wife's grandfather and that he had died at East Killingly on either October 22 or 23, 1886, at the age of 94. He added that Henry W. Sparks had little property when he died, that he had died very suddenly, 'had no sickness, some kind of a shock caused his death.'

[Editor's note: We have no information in our files pertaining to this Henry W. Sparks, although he was probably closely related to the Ebenezer Sparks of Killingly whose Revolutionary War pension papers were published in the March, 1957, issue of the Quarterly, Vol. V, No. 1.[Whole No. 17])

JACOB F. SPARKS, of Philadelphia, Penna., born ca. 1779. Bounty Land Warrant File 849-40-50.

On October 29, 1850, Jacob F. Sparks, a resident of Philadelphia, applied for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 71 years old and that he had been captain of a company in the 88th Regiment of Pennsylvania Militia commanded by Cob. John Thompson; that he was drafted at Philadelphia on or about September 14, 1814, for the term of 14 months, but that he was discharged after 4 months on January 7, 1815, at Philadelphia. He stated that he had received no discharge. He signed his application as 'Jacob F. Sparks.' Joel Cook, a Justice of the Peace, witnessed his signature.

Official records gave his service as from September 14, 1814, to January 7, 1815. He was granted 40 acres of bounty land. Since there is no record of his applying for additional bounty land under the act of 1855, it is probable that he had died by 1855.

JAMES SPARKS (30.2.5.2.1.6), of Bedford County, Pennsylvania; born ca. 1788. Bounty Land Warrant File 13 552-120-55.

On June 14, 1851, James Sparks, a resident of Bedford County, Penna., applied for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 62 years old and that he had been a private in the company commanded by Capt. Solomon Sparks in the 2nd Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers commanded by Col. William Piper in the War of 1812; that he volunteered at Bloody Run in Bedford County, Penna., on or about September 1, 1812, for 6 months and was 'dismissed from the service at Black Rock on the Niagra River to find winter quarters some time in Dec, 1812, being absent from his home about 4 months." He signed his application as 'James Sparks.' His application was by John Sparks, Justice of the Peace.

Added to this application is a sworn statement by David Fletcher and Joseph Sparks who stated 'that the above Declaration is true according to the best of their knowledge and Belief they having been volunteers in the Same Company with him and that they marched with him to black Rock and wear [sic] Compeled to seek winter quarters.'

On December 17, 1851, James Sparks submitted another sworn statement to the effect that he had been 'honourably discharged at Black Rock, but never received any written or printed discharge;' that Samuel Smith and David Fletcher, who had served with him, had already received bounty land. John Sparks, Justice of the Peace, again signed as witness.

Official records revealed that James Sparks had served in 30.2.5.2.5 Solomon Sparks's company from September 25 to November 24, 1812. He was granted 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 24, 1855, James Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the provisions of the act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 64, a resident of Bedford County. He gave the same information about his service as he had in his application of 1851. He signed his name as 'James Sparks'; James Bedford, Justice of the Peace, signed as witness. Also signing as witnesses were Solomon Hollar and John Mortimer; the latter signed by mark. James Sparks was granted an additional tract of 120 acres.

(Editor's note: We have several records pertaining to Solomon Sparks's company of Riflemen of the Second Regiment commanded by Cob. William Piper. A pay roll of the company dated November 24, 1812 (see the Pennsylvania Archives, 6th Series, Vol. 7, pp. 737-38) lists the names of the men in the company. James Sparks was listed as '2nd Corp'l.' Three privates named Sparks were also listed: Joseph Sparks, Abraham Sparks, and Joseph Sparks, Jr. (Both of the Joseph Sparkses received bounty land and their papers will be published when we reach their spot in the alphabet.) The Solomon Sparks who was captain of this company was the same Solomon Sparks who served in the American Revolution whose pension papers for that service were published in the March, 1955, issue of the Quarterly (Vol. III, No. 1, pp. 59-61 [Whole No. 9]). He was born in Frederick County, Maryland, in 1758 and was a son of Joseph Sparks who died in Bedford County, Penna., in 1809. Solomon Sparks was either the father or an uncle of the above James Sparks.

There are no records in this file of the widow of James Sparks receiving a pension. In the Pennsylvania Archives (6th Series, Vol. 9), however, Phoebe Sparks, widow of James Sparks, is listed as having received a pension about 1778. This may have been a pension given by the state of Pennsylvania.)


Page 542-545
Whole Number 33

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

30.2.1.2.1.6.6 JAMES SPARKS, of Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia; died 1816. Bounty Land Warrant File 27 446-160-12.

The earliest document in this file is a letter dated Jan, 27, 1846, written by A. Truxnbo, a Congressman from Kentucky, to the Pension Office asking 'whether the name of James Sparks is found upon the Muster Rolls of 1812 or 1813. He served under Capt. Henry, was a citizen of Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia, at the time he went into the service. He died in the service & his heirs want to get his bounty land if they are entitled to it.'

The Treasury Department found proof of the service of James Sparks--he enlisted on July 28, 1812, for 5 years as a private in Capt. Archer's Company of Artillery and 'he served honestly & faithfully to 17 July 1816 when he died.' This record also states that the pay to which James Sparks was entitled when he died was paid to S. C. Wooldridge, the administrator of his estate.

On June 8, 1846, at a court held in Carter County, Kentucky, 'satisfactory evidence was adduced in court, to prove that James Sparks enlisted under Captain Henry [sic] about the 1st of July 1812 at Jonesville, Virginia, for the term of five years and that he has left this country & been absent for many years and reported to be dead and that 30.2.1.2.1.6.1 Ephraim Sparks, 30.2.1.2.1.6.7 Jesse Sparks, 30.2.1.2.1.6.2 William Sparks, 30.2.1.2.1.6.4 Solomon Sparks, 30.2.1.2.1.6.5 Nancy Sparks, and 30.2.1.2.1.6.3 Lela Sparks (also one Rebecca Sparks, a half sister) are the Brothers and Sisters and the only heirs at law in fee to said James Sparks.' 160 acres of bounty land were granted to these heirs of James Sparks.

(Editor's note: We have been gathering material on the Lee County, Va., Sparks family and hope to be able to publish a detailed record in the Quarterly. Should any member of the Association trace his ancestry to Lee County, or the adjoining county of Washington, please get in touch with the editor.)

JAMES SPARKS, of Bowdoinham, Maine, born ca. 1795. Bounty Land Warrant File 8 946-160-55.

In March (day of month omitted) 1855, James Sparks appeared before David I. Wright, a Justice of the Peace of the town of Pendernham and made application far bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 60 years old and was a resident of the town of Bowdoinham, Sagadahoc County, Maine. He swore that he was the identical James Sparks who was a soldier in Capt. Joseph Dustin's company in Col, C. Thomas' Regiment of Maine Militia, and that he served from September 1 to October 10, 1814. He signed his name on the application as 'James Sparks.' The witnesses to this application were James Woodworth and T. M. Quinnain.

War Department records proved that James Sparks had served in the Maine Militia from June 27 to July 11, 1814, a total of 15 days. A warrant for 160 acres of land was issued to James Sparks on October 24, 1855.

JAMES SPARKS, born between 1780 and 1795; enlisted in 1812 at Rookingham Court House, Richmond County, N.C.; married in Anson County, N.C., in 1818; resident of Lexington County, S.C., in 1871.

On May 229 1871, James Sparks made application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. He declared that he was a resident of Lexington County, South Carolina; that he was married, having married Nancy Huggins in Anson County, North Carolina, in Oct, 1818. He swore that he was the identical James Sparks who had enlisted and served in the Regular Service of the U.S. as a private in Capt. Sanders Donahue's company of the Second Regiment of Artillery in the War of 1812. He stated that he had enlisted at Rockingham Court House in North Carolina on or about July 25, 1812, for 5 years and was honorably discharged at Fort Scott, Alabama, on or about July 25, 1817. He stated that he had received a bounty land warrant for 160 acres. He added that he had been under the command of Maj. Forney and Col. Wilborn and was stationed on Fort Moultries Island at Charleston '& during my term of Service assisted in building Fort Scott--General Pinckney Commanding.' He signed his application by mark before R. Harmon, Deputy, Trial Justice Court, Lexington County. The witnesses to his signature by mark were John K. Kneece and Lodwick Hartley, both of whom signed their full names.

On October 24, 1871, the Adjutant General's Office reported that records proved that James Sparks had enlisted on July 25, 1812, in North Carolina, for 5 years and had been assigned to the U.S. Artillery Corps. 'He is reported enlisted by Lieut. Dearing--served in Captains S. Donahue's and Archers' Companies and Present June 30, 1817. No further information.'

James Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month on January 31, 1872. Nothing in this file reveals the date of death of James Sparks nor is there any record of the bounty land which he stated he had received.

(Editor's Note: The above James Sparks was probably a son of James and Sarah (Lynch) Sparks who were residents of Anson County, N.C., during the early 1800's. The elder James Sparks was a son of Charles Sparks who had been born in the mid-1700's in Spotsylvania County, Virginia.)

32.4.6 JAMES SPARKS, born ca. 1791, died July 23, 1851; enlisted in Jefferson County, Kentucky, died in Marion County, Missouri. Bounty Land Warrant File 11 820-160-55.

On 5 February 1851, James Sparks of Marion County, Missouri, appeared before William P. C Harrison, Mayor of the city of Hannibal, Missouri., and made a sworn statement in application for bounty land. James Sparks stated that he was 61 years and 6 months of age (thus born ca. 1791) and was a resident of Marion County, Missouri. He swore that he was the identical James Sparks who was a private in Capt. Samuel Kelly's company in the 8th Regiment of Kentucky commanded by Col. Callaway in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered at Jefferson County, Kentucky, on or about August 1, 1813, for 6 months and continued in service for 4 months and was discharged at Jefferson County, Kentucky, on or about December 5, 1813. He further stated 'that he received a written discharge . . . and put the same in the possession of one John Schrader supposing him to be entitled thereto by reason of the fact that he affiant supplied his said Schrader's place in said Company,' and that he did not know what had become of said Schrader. He sigued his name as 'James Sparks.' War Department records proved that James Sparks had served as he stated, from August 26 to November 9, 1813.

Another document, also dated 5 February 1851, signed by James Sparks, appointed Ferdinand W. Risque of Washington, D.C., his lawful attorney.

On 6 Jan1852, a land warrant for 40 acres was issued to James Sparks (No. 36-581) but by the time it was received, James Sparks had died.

On April 15, 1854, Braxton Gilbert of Marion County, Missouri., appeared before the clerk of the Hannibal Court of Common Pleas and declared that he was the guardian of Franklin Sparks, the only minor child of James Sparks who had died July 23, 1851. The warrant which had been received after James's death was returned, and it was requested that a new warrant be issued to Franklin Sparks. Braxton Gilbert stated that Franklin Sparks was about 18 years of age. Accompanying this application was a copy of the court record which had appointed Braxton Gilbert the guardian of Franklin Sparks dated October 3, 1853.

A warrant for bounty land was issued to Franklin Sparks on April 23, 1854 (No. 58-749) far 40 acres. When the new law of 1855 became effective, Gilbert returned Franklin Sparks' s warrant far 40 acres and was able to get a warrant for 160 acres in its place, (No. 11820).

(Editor's Note: The above James Sparks is believed to have been living in Louisville, Ky., in 1825. He was in Marion County, Missouri., by 1831--on April 30, 1831, he purchased 25 acres of land in Marion County from Jos. and Polly Hanner, and on the same day he and his wife, Nancy, sold the same 25 acres, along with an 80 acre tract, to William Robertson. Descendants believe that James's wife's maiden name was Nancy (or Anna) Kennet, and that she was a daughter of Joshua Kennet. She died before 1840. It is believed that James and Nancy (Kennet) Sparks had the following children, perhaps others:

32.4.6.1 Miranda Sparks, born ca. 1817, married Braxton Gilbert.
32.4.6.2 John Wesley Sparks, married May 22, 1845, in Marion County, Missouri., Margaret Minor.
32.4.6.3 Hester Sparks, married William Benjamin Davis.
32.4.6.4 Catherine Sparks, married May 1, 1845, in Hannibal, Missouri., William Minor.
32.4.6.5 Elizabeth Sparks, born 1825 at Louisville, Ky., married William McRae in Hannibal, Missouri.
32.4.6.6 William Samuel Sparks, married October 31, 1844, in Marion Co., Missouri., Clarissa Jane Lee.
32.4.6.7 Franklin Sparks, born ca. 1836, married Lydia


Page 579-589
Whole Number 35

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

JOEL SPARKS, born prior to 1793, died about 1861, of Surry County, North Carolina, and Bates County, Missouri. Bounty Land File BL Reg. 207 286-1855.

On August 13, 1855, Joel Sparks of Bates County, Missouri, applied for bounty land under the Congressional Act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 62 years of age (although from other records it would appear that he must have been several years older than this) and that he had served as a private in Capt. Witcher's Company in a regiment of North Carolina Militia commanded by a Col. Adkinson in the War of 1812; that he was drafted at Surry County, N.C., in the fall of 1814 for the term of 6 months, but that he served only 14 days; that he was honorably discharged at Hillsborough, N.C., on or about December 1, 1814. He signed the application as 'Joel Sparks'; the witnesses were Ms.(?) M. Briseve and Geo. C. Pulliam. Squire G. Allen signed as a justice of the peace.

The Treasury Department reported that no record could be found of Joel Sparks's service.

In 1857 Joel Sparks asked that his application be re-examined and he submitted as proof of his service a statement made on March 27, 1857, by his brother, William Sparks, of Cooper County, Missouri. This document reads as follows: 'State of Missouri County of Cooper On this 27th day of March AD 1857, personally appeared before me the Clerk of the County Court within and for the County of Cooper aforesaid, William Sparks who having been by me first duly sworn on his oath states that ----- [a fold in the paper has made the line il1egible] ----- sixty seven years-- who was a private in the Company Commanded by Captain Witcher, in the 13th Regiment of the North Carolina Militia, Commanded by Col. Atkinson in the war with Great Br itam, declared by the United States on the 18th day of June 1812; that he was drafted on or about the month of July AD 181 [sic] for the time of six months and continued in actual service in said War for the term of more than fourteen days. This affiant further states that at the time he was drafted as aforesaid and in the County of Surry and State of North Carolina, his brother Joel Sparks--whose claim No. 207.286 far bounty land is said to be suspended--was drafted and to the Certain Knowledge of this affiant served as a private in the same Company same Regiment and same war for a period of more than fourteen days. And that whilst said service was being performed by said Joel Sparks as aforesaid, he said Joel, became so disabled on account of a rising in left leg near the ancle as to be unable to continue in said service. And that on account of said disability said Joel Sparks was honorable discharged by said Commander of said Regiment. This affiant was present and saw said Joel Sparks honorably discharged for the reason aforesaid, in the town of Hillsboro in Orange County and State of North Carolina, and that he saw the said discharge afterwards in the possession of said Joel Sparks, and that he has no interest in the claim of said Joel Sparks for bounty Land. And further this affiant saith not. [signed] William Sparks.' This statement was sworn to before Henry C. Levens, Clerk of the County Clerk, who certified that 'I have long known the said William Sparks personally and that he is a credible person.'

Another document that Joel Sparks submitted with his request that his application be reconsidered, was a sworn statement by his daughter, Nancy Ashcraft, who appeared before A. S. Pulliam, a justice of the peace of Cass County, Missouri, on April 11, 1857. The document reads as follows: 'On this 11th day of Aprile AD 1857, personally appeared Before me A. S. Pulliam a Justice of the Peace in and for the County of Cass, and State of Missouri, Nancy Ashcraft who having been by me first duly Sworn on her oath Stats, that she is the oldest Chld of Joel Sparks and that She is forty Eight or nine years of age, that she was Knowing to her Farther Joel Sparks Enlisting in the war with Great Britton declared by the United States, 18th of June 1812 for the term of Six Months, She does not no how long he Continued in the servis. This Affeant further States at the time her Farther Joel Sparks Enlisted that he lived in the County of Surry in State of North Carolina and that she has frequently saw her Farthers Discharge and that she has no Interest in the Claim of said Joel Sparks for Bounty land.' Nancy Ashcraft signed this statement by mark.

On May 16, 1857, the Treasury Department re-examined the bounty land claim of Joel Sparks but reported that, whereas the name of William Sparks was on the roll of Capt. John Witcher's Company of North Carolina Militia as having served from November 28, 1814, until February 22, 1815, the name of Joel Sparks did not appear, and he did not receive bounty land.

(Editor's Note: 1.2.1.2.1.2.4 Joel Sparks was a son of 1.2.1.2.1.2 Matthew and Eunice Sparks of Surry County, North Carolina, and a great-grandson of 1.2.1.2.1 William Sparks who came from Frederick County, Maryland, to North Carolina about 1760. Matthew Sparks, father of Joel, made his will in Surry County on March 26, 1819; he named his children as: [Webmaster Note: original list has an incorrect order. Replaced with list from WN 190].

1.2.1.2.1.2.1 Nancy Smith;
1.2.1.2.1.2.2 Margaret ["Peggy"] West.
1.2.1.2.1.2.3 Sally Bray;
1.2.1.2.1.2.4 Joel Sparks;
1.2.1.2.1.2.5 George Sparks;
1.2.1.2.1.2.6 Matthew Sparks, Jr.;
1.2.1.2.1.2.7 William Sparks;
1.2.1.2.1.2.8 John Sparks;

Joel Sparks, who appears to have been Matthew's oldest son, was married twice. by his first wife, whose name we have not found, Joel Sparks is said to have had nine children; the following are known to have been among these nine: Nancy, who married FNU Ashcraft; John C. Sparks, born 1815; William W. Sparks, born ca. 1817; and Joel Sparks, Jr., born 1824.

Prior to 1850, Joel Sparks moved to Lafayette County, Missouri; by 1855 he was living in Bates County, Missouri. His first wife died in Surry County, N .C., prior to 1846, and as his second wife, he married in Wilkes County, North Carolina, Mary Shatley. The marriage bond for this second marriage is dated November 23, 1846. by his second wife, Joel Sparks had three Sons: (1.) Andrew J. Sparks, born ca. l848; (2) David Francis Sparks, born ca. 1849; and, (3) So1omon Sparks, born ca. 1851.

JOHN SPARKS, born ca. 1793; of Salem County, New Jersey. Bounty Land Warrant File 15366-120-55.

On December 19, 1850, John Sparks of Upper Penns Neck, Salem County, N.J., applied for bounty land. He stated that he was 57 years old and that he had served as 4th corporal in Capt. Peter Sander's company in the New Jersey Militia coninanded by Col. Joshua L. Howell in the War of 1812; that he was drafted at Upper Penns Neck on or about September 20 to 26, 1814, for 6 months, but that he served about three months and was honorably discharged between December 20 to 26, 1814, at Salem, N.J. He added that he did not receive a written discharge. He signed his name as 'John Sparks' before Hudson A. Springer, a justice of the peace.

John Sparks received 40 acres of bounty land (Warrant No. 19817) as a result of this application.

On March 29, 1855, John Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the Act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 64 years of age and a resident of Salem County, N.J. His other statements were essentially the same as those he had made in 1850. He signed this application as 'John Sparks'; John Thompson signed as justice of the peace, and Lewis Mairey and James M. Allen signed as witnesses.

John Sparks was granted an additional warrant for 120 acres of bounty land under the 1855 Act.

JOHN SPARKS, born June 26, 1784, probably in North Carolina; he grew up and married in Georgia; died October 18, 1856, at Tallassee, Alabama. Widow Sarah (Brooks) Sparks, born October 16, 1788, died in the 1860's in Texas. Bounty Land Warrant File 44 943-80-55.

On March 15, 1854, Sarah Sparks of Titus County, Texas, mad. application for bounty land. She stated that she was 65 years of age and that she was the widow of John Sparks who had been a volunteer in the Georgia Militia in a company commanded by a Capt. Varner; that he volunteered at Fort Hawkins, was mustered into service in 1813 for 6 months and was honorably discharged on or about March 1, 1814, 'which discharge has been lost from her said Sarah's possession.' She further stated that her husband, John Sparks, was also a volunteer in the Alabama Militia in the Creek and Seminole Indian War of 1836 in a company commanded by John H. Broadnax for 3 months. 'Said Sarah further states that she married said John Sparks in Jackson County, Georgia, on the 29th day of March A.D. 1806 by one William Spencer, Justice of the Peace, and that her said husband, John Sparks, died at Tallasee [Alabama] on the 18th day of October AD 1836, and that she is still a widow.' She signed her name as 'Sarah Sparks' and J. A. McLauren signed as justice of the peace.

Attached to the application of Sarah Sparks is the following statement by her son, Nathan F. Sparks: 'Personally appeared before me F. N. Sparks & after being Sworn according to law declares that his father John Sparks was mustered into Service at Tallassee in 1836 for three Months & twenty Six days under Capt John Broadnax & continued in actual Service for near that time & was honorably discharged at the said Tallassee. [signed] N. F. Sparks. Sworn to & Subscribed before me March 15th 1854 [signed] J. A. McLauren, J.P.'

In order to prove that she was the widow of John Sparks, Sarah Sparks submitted an affidavit signed before a justice of the peace by James Brooks and Paschal Brooks of Chambers County, Alabama, who swore: 'that they were acquainted with John Sparks and Sarah Sparks and that they were present when the said John Sparks and Sarah Sparks was married and that said marriage took place in Jackson County and State of Georgia.' Both parties signed their names to this document on November 8, 1854, before Nathan Y. Hunter, an acting justice of the peace.

On January 2, 1855, William Sparks and Francis M. Sparks, sons of John and Sarah (Brooks) Sparks, of Titus County, Texas, deposed that John Sparks had volunteered for service against the Creek Indians on or about May 1, 1836, and was mustered into service at Tallassee in Talapoosy (i.e. Tallapoose.) County, Ala., in the company of Capt. John H. Broadnax and that he was honorably discharged at Tallassee after 3 months and 26 days; and 'that they were eye witnesses to what they have above stated' and that each of them had already received 40 acres of bounty land for his service. They signed this document as 'Wm Sparks' and 'Francis M. Sparks'; James Cowan was the justice of the peace before whom they swore.

Sarah Sparks was granted 80 acres of bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850.

On February 19, 1856, Sarah Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the Act of 1855. She made her application before R. J. Holbrook, a notary public of Titus Co., Texas, but in her application she stated that she was a resident of Stephens County. She stated that she was 67 years old and that before her marriage to John Sparks her name had been Sarah Brooks. She gave essentially the same information as she had in her earlier application. She signed her name as 'Sarah Sparks'; the witnesses were William Sparks and Campbell English.

The Pension Office asked for proof of her marriage to John Sparks and on December 9, 1856, Sarah Sparks wrote from Lone Star, Titus County, Texas, that she had submitted proof of her marriage with her first application. Francis M. Sparks and James B. Sparks of Titus County, Texas, added a statement to her letter, stating that Sarah Sparks was the widow of John Sparks and that 'she lived with John Sparks as his wife and raised a large family of children.' They signed their names as 'F. N. Sparks' and 'James B. Sparks'; although they did not state their relationship to Sarah Sparks, they were actually her sons. R. J. Holbrook signed as notary public.

Sarah Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land under the Act of 1855.

(Editor's Note: This John Sparks was born, according to a family Bible record, on June 26, 1784. He was a son of Matthew Sparks, Jr., and a grandson of Matthew and Sarah Sparks (see the Quarterly of June, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 2, pp. 556-66 [Whole No. 34], for a sketch of John' s grandparents, Matthew and Sarah Sparks). (See the Quarterly of Dec, 1956, Vol. IV, No. 4, pp. 179-182 [Whole No. 16], for the pension papers of Matthew Sparks, Jr., father of John Sparks.) John Sparks was born at about the time his father and grandfather moved from Wilkes County, North Carolina, to Franklin County, Georgia, probably a few months before the family made the journey. According to research done by Dee Brown Walker of Dallas, whose wife descends from John and Sarah (Brooks) Sparks, they were the parents of the following children: (1) William J. Sparks; (2) Nathan F. Sparks; (3) James Brooks Sparks, born January 31, 1809; (4) Sara Idris Sparks, married ---- Deny; (5) Martha N. Sparks, married James T. Rutledge; and (6) Francis Marion Sparks, born 4 February 1818. There was probably another daughter named Nancy who married William Thomas.)

JOHN SPARKS, born ca. 1773 in New Jersey; died before 1831. Bounty Land Warrant Fil. No. 8 677-160-12.

The papers in this file are obviously incomplete. This John Sparks was a private in Capt. Robinson's Company in the 42nd Regiment of the regular U.S. Army. Among the papers is his discharge which states that he had enlisted on November 13, 1813, to serve throughout the war, and that he was honorably discharged at Philadelphia on May 19, 1815; and that at the time of his discharge he was 42 years of age, 5 feet 10½ inches tall, of dark complexion, with brown eyes and dark hair, and that he had been born in New Jersey.

From the extant papers, it appears that on February 10, 1817, a warrant (number 8677) had been issued to John Sparks for 160 acres of bounty land, but that he never located or claimed this land. In 1831, the heirs of John Sparks, residents of Pennsylvania, inquired whether they might obtain a new warrant, because John Sparks was now dead and the original warrant had been lost. Apparently nothing more was done until 1852.

According to a document in the file, on December 1, 1852, at a court held in Lycoming County, Penna., 'satisfactory evidence was adduced in court to prove that Margaret Sparks, Elizabeth Sparks, James Sparks, and Mary Sparks were the legal heirs and children of John Sparks, deceased, that Elizabeth is intermarried with Joseph Milnor, and Mary with Joseph Houghton, and now survive and that the other heirs [not named] have not been heard of for twenty years & are supposed to be dead.' J. M. Green, prothonotary of Lycoming County, Penna., certified that this document was a true copy of the court record.

On October 22, 1852, a sworn statement was made by 'Charlotte Milner, wife of James Milner,' of Lycoming County, that she had 'full knowledge of the heirs of John Sparks' and named them in the same way as in the court record. Charlotte Milner signed this statement by mark, which was witnessed by R. W. Carson and J. G. Rathwell, J.P.

(Editor's note: According to a book entitled War with Great Britain, 1812-1815, John Sparks enlisted in the 42nd Regiment at Toms River, New Jersey.)

JOHN SPARKS, of Union and Spartanburg Counties, South Carolina; born ca. 1795, died in 1857. Bounty Land Warrant Fil. No. 22 273-80-55.

On December 7, 1850, John Sparks appeared before a magistrate in Union County, South Carolina, and made application for bounty land under the Act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 55 years old and a resident of Union County, and that he had been a private in a company commanded by Capt. Thomas White in the First Regiment of South Caroline. Militia commanded by Col. Hugh Means in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered at Spartanburg District in South Carolina on or about October 1, 1814, for 6 months and that he actually served 5 months; that he was honorably discharged on or about March 8, 1815, but received no written discharge. He signed his declaration as 'John Sparks.'

Attached to the above declaration 18 a sworn statement by William Hall dated December 7, 1850, in which he deposed that 'he is well acquainted with John Sparks' and that 'he Volunteered, served, and was honorably discharged at Charleston, South Carolina' and 'that he remembers well the said John Sparks Volunteered and left Union District about the first day of October 1814 and was In the service when deponant entered as a private.' William Hall signed by mark. Both declarations were certified by a magistrate whose name appears to have been J. M. Hadberry.

John Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land under the 1850 Act.

On April 26, 1855, John Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the Act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 62 years old and a resident of Spartanburg District in South Carolina. His statements regarding his service during the War of 1812 were the same as he gave in 1850. The witnesses to this declaration were J. W. Tucker and Henry Griffin--the latter signed by mark. O. E. Edwards signed as notary public.

(Editor's Note: The above John Sparks was a son, probably the oldest son, of Josiah and Lydia (Tollison) Sparks of Union County, South Carolina. From information available at present, it appears that Josiah Sparks, father of John, was the same Josiah Sparks who was born August 26, 1761, in Prince George's County, Maryland, (see the Quarterly of March, 1956, Vol. IV, No. 1, p. 120 [Whole No. 13]). In his will, dated February 12, 1851, Josiah Sparks named his children as John, Thomas, James, Muse, Nancy, Elizabeth, Abigail, Frances, and Mary Ann. John Sparks, son of Josiah, was listed on the 1850 census of Union County, South Carolina, as a farmer 56 years of age and born in South Carolina. His wife, whose name appears to have been Fereby, had apparently died before 1850. Living with John Sparks in 1850 were the following: Sarah Sparks, aged 25; Mary Sparks, aged 11; ElIjah Sparks, aged 27; and Martha Sparks, aged 14--all were probably his children. Also living with him was Catherine Sparks, aged 70--perhaps she was an aunt. John Sparks died in Spartanburg County in 1857; his brother, Elijah Sparks, was administrator of his estate.)

JOHN SPARKS, born ca. 1789; enlisted in Brown County, Ohio, in 1813; a resident of Johnson County, Indiana in 1850. Bounty Land Warrant File No. 9 103-160-50.

On November 30, 1850, John Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace in Johnson County, Indiana, in order to make application for bounty land. He swore that he was 61 years old and was a resident of Johnson County; that he had been a private in a company commanded by Capt. William B., Watson in the 24th Regiment of Ohio Regulars commanded by a Col. Smith in the War of 1812; that he had enlisted at Decatur, Brown County, Ohio, on July 3, 1813, for one year and actually served one year and was honorably discharged at Buffalo, New York, on June 22, 1814, 'as will appear by his original discharge, Deposited as he supposes in the pension office at the city of Washington.' He signed his application by mark before George Botsford, Justice of the Peace. His return address was given as Nineveh Post Office, Williamsbgh, Johnson County, Indiana.

Among the papers in this file is a letter written by Jonathan H. Williams for John Sparks on September 12, 1851, explaining that he had sent his discharge to the pension office in 1846 for the purpose of applying for a pension. The discharge, however, is not among the papers in this file and there is no record of his receiving a pension.

John Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land for his service. Since he made no application under the Act of 1855, it is probable that he died between 1850 and 1855.

JOSEPH SPARKS, born ca. 1785, of Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Bounty Land Warrant File No. 82 175-120-55.

On June 14, 1851, Joseph Sparks, a resident of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, appeared before a justice of the peace named John Sparks and made application for bounty land. Joseph Sparks swore that he was 66 years old and that he had been a private in the company commanded by Capt. Solomon Sparks in the Second Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers commanded by Col. William Piper in the War of 1812; that he volunteered at Bloody Run in Bedford County, Penna., on or about September 1, 1812, for 6 months; that he 'was dismissed from the service at Black Rock on the Niagara River to find winter quarters some time in Dec, 1812, being absent from his home about four months.' He signed his name as 'Joseph Sparks." Attached to this application is the following statement: 'June the 14th 1851: Personally appeared before me John Sparks a Justice of the Peace within and for the County of Bedford, David Fletcher and James Sparks and after being duly sworn doth Depose and say that the above declaration is true according to the best of their Knowledge and belief they having been volunteered in the same Company with him and that they marched with him to Black Rock and were compeled to seek winter quarters and further saith not given under our hands and seals [signed] David Fletcher [and] James Sparks.'

Apparently there was some question in the Pension Office regarding Joseph Sparks's statement that he had been 'dismissed from the service' at Black Rock, and on December 17, 1852, he again appeared before John Sparks, Justice of the Peace, and deposed 'That he was honourably discharged at Black Rock, but never received any written or printed discharge; that Samuel Smith and David Fletcher to whom Bounty Land Warrants have been issued, served in the same company & returned home at the same time.'

Joseph Sparks was issued a warrant (No. 20,216) for 40 acres of land.

On April 28, 1855, Joseph Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the new Act of 1855. He stated that he was 69 years old and was a resident of West Providence Township, Bedford County, Penna. He gave no additional information regarding his service in the war. He signed his application as 'Joseph Sparks' and David Fletcher and James Sparks, both of West Providence Township, Bedford County, signed as witnesses. John Sparks signed as justice of the Peace.

Joseph Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land under the Act of 1855. (Editor's Note: On the 1850 census of West Providence Township, Bedford County, Penna., Joseph Sparks was listed as a farmer aged 65 years and born in Penna. Living in the same household were Christiana Sparks, aged 70; Elizabeth Sparks, aged 60; and Andrew Hornlee, aged 28; all born in Penna. For additional information on Joseph Sparks, see the following abstracts of papers in the file of Joseph S. Sparks and the Editor's Note following those abstracts.)

JOSEPH S. SPARKS, born ca. 1794, of Bedford County, Penna.; moved to Bureau County, Illinois, in 1851; died in 1868. Bounty Land Warrant File No. 358-40-55. Pension File W C 27 481.

On February 1, 1851, Joseph S. Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace named James Belford in Bedford County, Penna., and made application for bounty land. He stated that he was 57 years old and a resident of East Providence, Bedford County, Penna.; that he was a volunteer in the company commanded by William Piper, afterwards commanded by Solomon Sparks, in the 2d Regiment of Riflemen commanded by Col. William Piper in the War of 1812; that he was mustered at Bloody Run in Bedford County on September 9, 1812, for the term of 6 months and continued in actual service for two months and 'received a pass' at Black Rock, New York, in Nov, 1812. He signed his name as 'Joseph S. Sparks. Attached to this application is a sworn statement by Abraham Sparks that he, too, was a private in William Piper's company, afterwards Solomon Sparks's company, and that Joseph S. Sparks was in the same company.

Joseph S. Sparks was is sued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 21, 1855, Joseph S. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the new act. He was now a resident of Bureau County, Illinois, and gave his age as 61. His statement regarding his service in the War of 1812 was essentially the same as that in his application of 1851, except that he stated he had been honorably discharged at Buffalo, New York, on or about 1 January 1813, 'on account of being ordered home with a sick Brother then & there in said company by order of said Captain.' He signed his name as 'Joseph S. Sparks' in the presence of Levi North, Justice of the Peace. The witnesses were J. Porter and Solomon Sparks.

When the 1855 application of Joseph S. Sparks was received, the Pension Office questioned whether Joseph Sparks and Joseph S. Sparks, both of Bedford County in 1850, were not the same person. On February 21, 1856, Joseph S. Sparks appeared before Joseph V. Thompson in Bureau County, Illinois, and stated 'that he was under the Command of Captain Solomon Sparks of Bloody Run, Pennsylvania in the War of 1812, that in the same company there was another Joseph Sparks, that at the time this affiant was enrolled and during the War his (the affiant's) name was Joseph Sparks, that after the War some years, this affiant changed his name to Joseph S. Sparks, in order that their names might be distinguished, that this affiant is probably five or six years younger than the other said Joseph Sparks.' He further stated that by the time his warrant for 40 acres had been sent to him in 1851, he had moved to Illinois, and that it was forwarded to him by his brother now in Bedford County (he did not give the brother' s name). He signed his name as 'Joseph S. Sparks.'

Joseph S. Sparks died at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois, on March 31, 1868. On May 23, 1878, his widow, Elizabeth Sparks, applied for a pension. In her application, she stated that she was 79 years of age (thus born ca. 1799) and that she was a resident of Wyanet, IL. She was unable to give many details regarding her husband's service because she stated that 'she did not become acquainted with her said husband until after the close of the war.' She stated that she married Joseph S. Sparks near the town of Taneytown in Frederick County, Maryland, on March 27, 1817, by John Cropp, a Minister of the Gospel, and that before her marriage her name was Elizabeth Naill, and that 'neither herself nor her husband had been previously married.' She stated that her husband had died at Wyanet on March 31, 1868; that from the date of their marriage to 1851 they had lived in Bedford County, Penna., that from 1851 to 1857 they lived in Enon, Bureau County, IL., and from 1857 to 1868 at Wyanet, IL. She signed her application as 'Elizabeth Sparks' in the presence of a notary public named O. Weaver. John Latty, aged 40, and Andrew Sapp, aged 30, both of Wyanet, IL., swore they had known Elizabeth Sparks for 30 years and 25 years respectively and were 'well acquainted with said Joseph S. Sparks, and have heard him say that he was a Soldier in the War of 1812 and said deceased always treated and acknowledged claimant as his wife.'

As proof of her marriage, Elizabeth Sparks submitted a document prepared May 30, 1878, in Frederick County, Maryland, by David W. Naill of Frederick County. (Since Elizabeth Sparks's maiden name was Naill, this was probably her brother.) David W. Naill made oath that he knew Elizabeth Sparks and Joseph S. Sparks and 'that he was present and one of those who waited upon them and saw claimant and said deceased husband married, that claimant's maiden name was Elizabeth Naill, and that she married said Joseph S. Sparks at her father ‘a house near Taney Town, Maryland, by the Reverend John Cropp, pastor of the Luthern Church in Taney Town on the 27th day of March eighteen hundred and seventeen ... that after their marriage he accompanied them to his father's residence near Bloody Run, Bedford County, Pennsylvania.' This statement was signed 'D. W. Naill' in the presence of H. Brenneisen, Justice of the Peace.

Also to accompany her application, Elizabeth Sparks arranged for a record to be prepared that is especially valuable to the genealogist--a true copy of the family Bible record of the births of the children of her and Joseph S. Sparks. Following is the list:

Mary Ann Elizabeth Sparks was Born the 19th day of December 1818
Solomon Christian Sparks was Born the 3rd day of December 1820
Rachel Rebecca Sparks was Born the 19th day of February 1823
Maria Sparks was Born the 28th day of August 1825
Susanna N. Sparks was Born the 18th day of December 1827
Abraham Sparks was Born the 3rd day of December 1830
David W. Sparks was Born the 15th day of July 1833
Joseph R. Sparks was Born the 17th day of December 1835
John E. N. Sparks was Born the 26th day of August 1839

In refering to this record of her children, Elizabeth Sparks stated that 'the Said family Bible has always been in my possession was Published by M. Carey No 121 Chesnut Street Philadelphia in the year 1816.' Added to this declaration is a certificate signed by 0.Weaver, Justice of the Peace, that he had examined the Bible record and found it to agree with the above copy, adding 'I have been acquainted with Joseph S. Sparks and Elizabeth Sparks and most of their living children Since the Fall of 1851 and know their ages to correspond with the above Record.'

Another document in this file is signed by Dr. F, C. Robinson, aged 42, and Jonas Peterson, aged 65, both of Wyanet, stating that Joseph S. Sparks died on March 31, 1868--that Dr. Robinson was his physician during his last illness and Peterson was the undertaker 'and attended the funeral in person.'

On February 20, 1879, Elizabeth Sparks wrote to enquire about her pension, stating that the lawyer who had taken care of her papers was under arrest and she feared he had never submitted her application. She stated in another document dated August 26, 1879, that she was 80 years old and that 'owing to her feebleness and old age she didn't feel able to Stand the Journey to a court of record.'

Elizabeth Sparks's application was approved on October 21, 1879, and she was granted a pension of $8.00 per month. Exactly when she died is unknown, but on July 4, 1892, her name was dropped from the pension rolls because of death.

(Editor's Note: Both Joseph Sparks (File No. 82 175-120-55) and Joseph S. Sparks (File No. 358-40-55) served as privates in Capt. Solomon Sparks's company organized in Bedford County, Penna. On a pay roll of this company printed in the Pennsylvania Archives, 6th Series, Vol. 7, pp. 737-38, covering the period from September 25 through November 24, 1812, 'Joseph Sparks' and 'Joseph Sparks, Jr.' are listed as privates receiving $13.32 for their service. Abraham Sparks was also listed as a private in the company and received $13.32. Solomon Sparks as captain received $80.00, and James Sparks, as 2d corporal, received $14.66. There were 50 men in the company. Solomon Sparks, the captain, a resident of Bloody Run in Bedford County, Penna., earlier had been a soldier in the American Revolution. (See the Quarterly of March, 1955, Vol. III, No. 1, pp. 59-61 [Whole No. 9], where his pension papers were published.) Solomon Sparks was born in 1758 in Frederick County, Maryland, and was a son of Joseph Sparks who moved with his family from Maryland to Bedford County, Penna., about 1778. This elder Joseph Sparks, who was born ca. 1730 and died in Providence Township, Bedford County, Penna., in 1809, left a will dated March 13, 1809, and probated April 3, 1809. He provided for his three sons, Joseph, Solomon, and James, and for his six daughters, Mary, Rebekah, Susannah, Elizabeth, Sarah, and Cloe. He referred to his son Joseph as being the eldest, born, therefore, about 1750; Solomon, we know, was born in 1758. His wife, whose maiden name is said to have been Mary McDaniel, had apparently died before 1809.

According to a History of Bedford, Somerset & Fulton Counties, Pennsylvania published in Chicago by Waterman,Watkins & Co. in 1884, page 309, all three of Joseph's sons lived in Bedford County, although Solomon moved to Indiana in his old age and died there. There is also a reference in this volume to a son of Joseph Sparks named John, but this appears to be an error as he was not mentioned in Joseph's will; according to the 1850 census, this John Sparks was not born until about 1799; he married Rebecca Warehani. According to the above history, Joseph Sparks, Sr., who died in 1809, was an extensive land owner and at one time he and his sons held 'nearly all the land on Clear Ridge from the river southward nearly five miles.' Of the sons of Joseph Sparks, Sr., this history mentions the children of only James. James Sparks married Nancy Rogers and had children named: (1) William Sparks, born ca. 1800; (2) Absolem, born ca. 1805; (3) David Sparks, born ca. 1810 and died 1869; (4) Mary; and (5) Elizabeth, *~ married Wilson L. Weeks. Of the children of Solomon Sparks, born 1758, we know the name of only his daughter Delilah who married Uriah Hughes. We have no information on the family of Joseph Sparks, Jr., born ca. 1750.

The Joseph Sparks (born ca. 1786) and the Joseph S. Sparks (born ca. 1794) who received bounty land for their service in the War of 1812, must have been grandsons of the Joseph Sparks, Sr., who died in 1809. Joseph Sparks (born ca. 1788), who remained in Bedford County, Penna., was probably the son of Joseph Sparks, Jr., while Joseph S. Sparks (born ca. 1794), who moved to Illinois, was probably the son of Solomon (born 1758). See the Quarterly of Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, pp. 529-30 [Whole No. 32], for the bounty land papers of James Sparks, born ca. 1788, of Bedford County who also served in Capt. Solomon Sparks's company. James Sparks must have been a brother of either Joseph Sparks (born ca. 1786) or Joseph S. Sparks (born ca. 1794).)

JOSEPH SPARKS, born ca. 1790, of Bristol, Rhode Island. Bounty Land Warrant File No. 6 307-80-55.

On December 16, 1851, Joseph Sparks, a resident of Bristol, Rhode Island, appeared before a justice of the peace named Bennett J. Munro to make application for bounty land. He swore that he was 61 years old and had served as a private in the War of 1812 in a company commanded by Capt. Adam S. Coe in the Rhode Island Regiment commanded by Col. John Wood; that he enlisted at Bristol on October 18, 1814, for one year and continued in actual service for 4 months and 12 days and was honorably discharged at Fort Adams in Newport on February 23, 1815; that he received no written discharge. He signed his name as 'Joseph Sparks.'

Joseph Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land (Warrant No. 37694) under the Act of 1850.

On March 27, 1855, Joseph Sparks again appeared before Bennett J. Monro (this time spelled Monroe) to make application for additional bounty land under the new Act of 1855. He stated that he was 65 years old and a resident of Bristol. He gave the same information regarding his service as he had earlier. Re signed his name as 'Joseph Sparks.' Thomas G. Holmes and Samuel Sparks signed as witnesses. Re was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

27.1.3 JOSEPH K. SPARKS, born ca. 1791, son of Stephen Sparks of Newberry County, South Carolina; died September 17, 1873, near Wilmington, Ohio; married, 1827, Elizabeth Goodwin; married (second) in 1842 Abi (Linton) Farquhar. Bounty Land Warrant File No. 6 355-30-55; Pension File W C 7 574.

On Oct, 31, 1850, Joseph K. Sparks, a resident of Clinton County, Ohio, made application for bounty land for his service in the War of 1812. He stated that he was 60 years old; that he had served in a company commanded by Capt Nat. Martin that 'marched from Laurens District, S. C., to a fort in the heart of the Creek Nation before they joined the regiment to which there were attached--that he thinks Col. Milton commanded the forces from that time till'they were overtaken by the North Carolina troops, that they were then commanded by Gen. Graham and joined Gen. Andrew Jackson at Fort Jackson near where the town of Montgomery, Alabama, now is; ... that he was drafted at Laurens District, South Carolina, on or about the 25th day of January A.D. 1814 for the term of six months and continued in actual service in said war for the whole of said term... and was honorably discharged at Fort Hawkins in the State of Georgia on or about the 25th day of July AD 1814. His best impression is that he never had a written discharge, but if he had the same has long since been lost or destroyed.' He signed his name as 'Joseph K. Sparks' in the presence of Amos L. Sewell, Justice of the Peace.

The Treasury Department reported that there were records in that office proving Joseph K. Sparks had served in Nat Martin's Company of South Carolina Militia from February 1, 1814, to August 2, 1814. He was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land (No. 1754).

On April 23, 1855, Joseph K. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the new Act, He stated that he was 64 years of age and a resident of Clinton County, Ohio. He gave no new information regarding his service in this application. He signed this declaration in the presence of John Darbyshire and David Linton; A. C. Diboll, Mayor of the village of Wilmington, signed as the official witness.

Joseph K. Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

On April 29, 1871, Joseph K. Sparks appeared before the Common Pleas Court of Clinton County, Ohio, to apply for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. He stated he was 80 years old, a resident of Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, and 'that his wife's name was Elizabeth Sparks to whom he was married at Cincinnati, Ohio, May 10, 1827.' (Elizabeth was his first wife and was dead at the time he made this statement.) In describing his military service, Joseph K. Sparks gave the same information as in his applications for bounty land, but added that he had 'done guard duty and. was in no battle.' He signed his name as 'Joseph K. Sparks' with J. W. Quinby and H. B. Crumly signing as witnesses; the application was made before L. D. Reed, Clerk of the County Court.

Joseph K. Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month. He died September 17, 1873.

On May 13, 1874, Abi Sparks appeared before John Matthews, Judge of the Probate Court of Clinton County, Ohio, and made application for a pension. She stated that she was 66 years of age, a resident of Wilmington and the widow of Joseph K. Sparks. She stated she had married Joseph K. Sparks on November 10, 1842; that prior to her marriage her name had been Abi Farquhar; she signed her name as 'Abi Sparks,' with R. M. Wickersham and W, C. Hadley as witnesses. Along with her application, Abi Sparks sent a certificate of her marriage signed by John Matthews, Judge of the Probate Court.

The application of Abi Sparks for a pension was turned down because the Act of Congress providing pensions for widow's of the War of 1812 required that the widow had to have been married to the soldier prior to July 17, 1815

On March 9, 1878, Congress passed a new Act providing pensions for all widows of soldiers of the War of 1812, regardless of the date of their marriage, and on April 11, 1878, Abi Sparks again applied. She stated she was 69 years old, a resident of Wilmington, Ohio; that she married Joseph K. Sparks near Wilmington, Ohio, on November 10, 1842, by a Rev. Waters, a Baptist Minister; that previously she had been 'married to Josiah Farquhar who died near Wilmington, Ohio, in A.D. 1838, and that her maiden name was Abi Linton and that Joseph K. Sparks was previously married to Elizabeth Goodwin who died about 1839 at Wilmington...' She stated that Joseph K. Sparks had died near Wilmington, Ohio, on September 17, 1873. She signed her name as 'Abi Sparks' in th. presence of John Matthews, Probate Judge. W. P. Wolf, aged 49, and L. D. Sayers, aged 38, both of Wilmington, signed as witnesses, stating that they had known Abi Sparks for 12 years and knew that she and Joseph K. Sparks had lived together as husband and wife.

Along with her application, Abi Sparks sent a statement by A. T. Davis dated June 5, 1878, to the effect that he was 75 years old and that he had been well acquainted with Joseph K. Sparks 'long before his marriage with Abi Farquhar in 1842.' She also submitted a statement signed by Nathan M. Linton, dated June 5, 1878, to the effect that he was 40 years old and had known Joseph K. Sparks and Abi Sparks as long as he could remember and that Abi was still a widow.

Among these papers is a letter dated April 13, 1878, written by J. W, Sparks to Charles E. Brown, an attorney in Cincinnati who was handling the application for Abi Sparks. This letter has a letter-head reading: 'Farquhar & Sparks, General Hardware & Implements, Wilmington, Ohio.' This letter reaçis as follows: 'We filled the blanks of the application to the best of our knowledge not having the pension certificate or the discharge papers, we gave these papers to lawyer Ent in 1874 who claimed that J. K. Sparks widow was entitled to a pension, but from investigation found that she was not. We enclose letter from Washington that may give you information also enclose blank that you sent J. K. Sparks about the time of his death there would be about four or five dollars due if they allow up to his death. J. K. Sparks went as a substitute for his brother that was drafted. Yours [signed] J. W. Sparks.'

On July 29, 1878, Abi Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month. The last document in the file is a letter to the Pension Office dated April 18, 1887, to the effect that Abi Sparks 'is still living, and is well known as a pensioner of the War of 1812.'

(Editor's Note: See the present issue of the Quarterly, pages 575 and 576, for genealogical data on Joseph K. Sparks.)


Pages 592-598
Whole Number 36

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

JOSEPH D. SPARKS, born ca. 1795 in Ulster County, New York, died March 29, 1867, at Jefferson, New York; a substitute in the War of 1812 for John Sparks; ESTHER C. (TITUS) SPARKS, widow. Land Warrant File 22 409-420-55; Pension File WC 15 492.

On December 3, 1850, Joseph D. Sparks, a resident of the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, appeared before a justice of the peace to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He swore that he was 55 years old and that he had served in a company commanded by Capt. Joseph Deyo in an infantry regiment of New York Militia commanded by Abraham F. Hardenbergh in the War of 1812; that 'John Sparks was detached at the town of Plattekill, Ulster County, New York, on or about the first day of September A.D. 1813 for the term of three months and that he the said Joseph D. Sparks continued in actual service in said war for the term of three months lacking about two weeks, as a substitute for the said John Sparks, as will appear by the muster rolls of said company. That; he was honorably discharged by a certificate from said Captain, but that from lapse of time the said certificate has been lost & he does not bmw where to find the same & has been unable to find it on deligent search therefor. That the said regiment was discharged at Schatangeau[?], four Corners N.Y. but he did not receive his said certificate till he arrived at the town of Paltz, Ulster Co. N.Y. when and where he received his pay for his service.' He signed his name as 'Joseph D. Sparks' in the presence of Cyrus K. Cor1iss, Justice of the Peace.

The Treasury Department reported that documents on file indicated that Joseph D. Sparks had served from September 8, 183, until October 27, 1813. He was granted 40 acres of bounty land under the act of 1850.

On April 10, 1855, Joseph D. Sparks appeared before Adolph M. Brush, a justice of the peace, and applied for additional bounty land under the act of 1855. He stated that he was 60 years old and a resident of Poughkeepsie, New York. In describing his service in the War of 1812, he gave no information besides that which he had given in 1850. He signed his name as 'Joseph D. Sparks.' The witnesses to his application were David T. Sparks and John W. Henderson. He was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land under the act of 1855.

Joseph D. Sparks died at Jefferson, New York, on March 29, 1867. On June 1, 1878, Esther C. Sparks, widow of Joseph D. Sparks, made application for a pension based on her husband's service in the War of 1812, under the act of March 9, 1878. She stated that she was 77 years old and that she had been married to Joseph D. Sparks in New Paltz, Ulster County, New York, on July 6, 1822, by William R. Bogardus, a Minister of the Gospel, and that her maiden name had been Esther C. Titus. She further stated that neither she nor her husband had been married previously, that her husband had died at Jefferson, New York, on March 29, 1867, and that she was still his widow. She stated that from the date of his discharge, Joseph D. Sparks had lived at Modena, Poughkeepsie, Franklin, and Jefferson, all towns in the state of New York. She stated that her own residence was in Austerlitz, Columbia County, New York, but that her post-office was Spencertown, in the same county. She signed her name as 'Esther C. Sparks' in the presence of Michael D. Higgins, Justice of the Peace. Ezra B. Peirce, aged 46, and Adelaide S. Peirce, aged 47, both residents of Spencertown, both swore that they had known 'the said Esther C. Sparks for 17 years and for 40 years respectively' and 'that they know the said Joseph D. & Esther C. Sparks lived together as Husband & wife until the death of the said Joseph D. Sparks in 1867.'

Accompanying the application of Esther C. Sparks for a pension was a sworn statement made May 28, 1878, by Elizabeth Conkling, aged 74, of the town of Shawaugenk[?], Ulster County, New York, who swore that 'she is a native of Ulster County...and has always lived in said county since birth, That on or about the sixth day of July in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty two, she was present at the Dutch Reformed Parsonage at New Paltz in said County of Ulster, and witnessed the marriage ceremony performed, according to the rites of the Dutch Reformed Church of America, between Joseph D. Sparks and Esther C. Titus, by William R. Bogardus, the Minister in charge of the said Church at New Paltz.' She signed her name as 'Elizabeth Conkling,' in the presence of Rector Sears, a notary public. Attached to this document is a statement signed by Jesse C. Howell identifying Elizabeth Conkling as a resident of the same town as himself and 'that she is an elderly person, and unable to travel, except for a very short distance.'

Also accompanying the pension application of Esther C. Sparks was a sworn statement made by her husband's nephew, James Sparks, of New York City. In May, 1878, James Sparks deposed that 'he was born in the town of New Paltz in the county of Ulster... in the year 1818, and now resides at No. 305 West 48th St. in the city of New York; and that he was personally acquainted with his father's brother, Joseph D. Sparks, & also with Esther C. Sparks his wife, from deponent's infancy to the time of the death of the said Joseph D. Sparks about ten years ago; and that the said Esther C. Sparks lived with her son-in-law, the Reverend Ezra B. Pierce at Spencertown in the county of Columbia in said state...' He signed this statement as 'James Sparks' in the presence of George M. Van Hoesen, a Judge of Common Pleas.

Also accompanying her application was a statement by Philip Peltz, Pastor of the Reformed Dutch Congregation in New Paltz; he stated that he had examined the records of the church and that during the ministry of William R. Bogardus there was recorded the following marriage: '1822, July 6, Joseph D. Sparks & Esther C. Titus.'

Esther C. Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month. The last paper in this file is a routine report dated May 28, 1887, that Mrs. Sparks was still living and was residing with her daughter, Mrs. Rev. E. B. Pierce at Copack, Columbia County, New York. On earlier records this name had been spelled Peirce.

(Editor's Note: From our few scattered references, it is apparent that there was a Sparks family in Ulster County, New York, early in the 1730's. A Robert Sparks was a member of the Ulster County Militia in 1738; George Sparks and Robert Sparks from Ulster County were members of Capt. William McGinnis' Company in 1755. In 1758 a Robert Sparks was listed in Capt. Ebenezer Sealy Jr.'s Ulster County Company and was described as 21 years of age, a weaver, born in Wall Kill, Ulster County, and as a member of Capt. Clinton's Company in 1760, Robert Sparks was described as 23 years of age, 5 feet 5½ inches tall, with black hair and black eyes.

Joseph D. Sparks was listed on the 1850 census of Dutchess County, New York, as 54 years of age and a mason by occupation; his wife, Esther, was listed as 48 years old; living with them were Adelade Sparks, age 18; David Sparks, age 22, George Sparks, age 16, and Seward Sparks, age 13. Also listed as living in the same household was George Sparks, aged 31, whose occupation was that of constable; his wife, Emily, was 25 years old, and their one child, Edgar Sparks, was one year olci; Also living in Dutchess County in 1850 was Maria Sparks, aged 54; living with her was Martha Sparks, aged 19; also Catherine Brown, aged 22; John Brown, aged 8; and Helen Brown, aged 3.)

JOSIAH SPARKS, born ca. 1796 in New Jersey, died in Wilmington, Delaware, on December 29, 1866; SARAH SPARKS, widow of Josiah Sparks, born ca. 1803, died June 15, 1899. Bounty Land Warrant File 60 386-120-55; Pension File WC 20 462.

On June 14, 1852, Josiah Sparks, a resident of Wilmington, Delaware, appeared before William B. Wiggins, a notary public, to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 56 years old and that he had served in the War of 1812 as a private in Capt. Peter Souder's Company in an infantry regiment commanded by a Col. Howell. He also swore that he had volunteered at Allowaystown, New Jersey, in July, 1814, had served for three months, and had been discharged at Salem, New Jersey, in Dec, 1814. He signed his application as 'Josiah Sparks.'

Accompanying this application was the following declaration made in New Castle County, Delaware, on June 25, 1852: 'Aaron Sparks maketh Solemn Oath and saith that he is sixty-two years of age and resides in Camden in the State of New Jersey and has been personally acquainted with Josiah Sparks for the last fifty years. and knows from his own personal knowledge that the said Josiah Sparks served in the company of Peter Souder as he says he did as deponent served with him for the same time and knows his statement is true and although he bears the same name he has no interest in the procuration of the Bounty asked for. [signed] Aaron Sparks.'

War Department records proved that Josiah Sparks had served from September 27 to December 20, 1814, and he was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On June 22, 1855, Josiah Sparks made application for additional bounty land under the act of 1855. He gave his age as 59 years and stated he was a resident of Wilmington, Delaware. He gave the same information regarding his service in the War of 1812 as he had on his earlier application, and he signed his name as 'Josiah Sparks.' The witnesses were George H. Phinneous and Andrew McKee. He was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

On October 9, 1878, Sarah Sparks, widow of Josiah Sparks, appeared before S. Rodmond Smith, Clerk of the U.S. District County in Delaware, to make application for a pension under the act of March 9, 1878. She stated she was 75 years old and a resident of 706 Market St., Wilmington, Delaware; that her name before her marriage to Josiah Sparks had been Sarah Doel, and that she had been married to Josiah Sparks on July 11, 1854, by the Rev. Robert Gerry at Wilmington, Delaware. She stated that her husband had died December 28, 1866. She signed her application as 'Sarah Sparks.' Henry P. Weaver of 706 Market St., and Sarah Coxe of 423 E. 8th St., Wilmington signed as witnesses, and their signatures were witnessed by William E., Grimmage and James H. Seeny.

With her application, Sarah Sparks submitted a statement by Albert W. Smith, Sec. and Treas. of the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery, dated February 13, 1879, that Josiah Sparks had died December 29, 1866, aged 72 years, of dropsy, and had been buried in Lot No. 1, Sec. P.

With her application, Sarah Sparks submitted a statement signed by Sarah Coxe on October 9, 1878, that she had known Sarah and Josiah Sparks from the time of their marriage and had no doubt that the marriage took place as Sarah Sparks stated. Also included was a statement signed by Sarah A. Robinson of 537 Elm St., Camden, New Jersey, that she had been present at the marriage on July 11, 1854, in Wilmington by the Rev. Robert Gerry, Pastor of Asbury Methodist Church in Wilmington.

Sarah Sparks was granted a pension of $12.00 per month which was paid until her death on June 15, 1899.

(Editor's Note: The Aaron Sparks, whose statement dated June 25, 1852, was quoted above, and who was probably closely related to Josiah, died September 4, 1856. His widow, Elizabeth, received a pension--see the Quarterly of September , 1960 (Vol. VIII, No. 3), p. 496. We have no records pertaining to Josiah Sparks, but it seems probable that Sarah Doel, whom he married in 1854, was a second wife.)

LABAN SPARKS, born ca. 1794 in Baltimore County. Maryland, son of Thomas and Rachel (Perdue) Sparks. Bounty Land Warrant File 50 098-120-55.

On December 10, 1851, Laban Sparks, a resident of Baltimore County, Maryland, appeared before Joshua F. Cockey, a justice of the peace, and applied for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 56 years old and declared that he had served as a private in a company commanded by Capt. Edward Orrick in the 41st Regiment of Maryland Militia commanded by Lt. Col. William Hutchins in the War of 1812. He said he had been drafted in Baltimore County on or about August 25, 1814, had served two months, and had been honorably discharged at Baltimore on October 27, 1814. He signed his application as 'Laban Sparks.' He was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 15, 1855, Laban Sparks apolied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He was still a resident of Baltimore County and gave his age as 61 years. His statement regarding his service was essentially the same as he had made in 1850. He again signed his name as 'Laban Sparks.' His witnesses to his application in 1855 were John Hale and Aquilla Wilson, both residents of Baltimore County. Laban Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

[Editor's Note: These papers are misfiled in the National Archives under the name Saban Sparks. For additional genealogical data on Laban Sparks see the Quarterly of June, 1958 (Vol. VI, No. 2), page 298 [Whole No. 22].)

LEONARD SPARKS, born between 1780 and 1790 in South Carolina, a resident of Jefferson County, Tennessee about 1806-1812, date of death uncertain; PATSEY (BEARD) SPARKS, born ca. 1780 in Tennessee, died about 1884 in Cherokee County, Alabama. Pension File WO 42 599.

On 1 January 1883, Patsey Sparks, a resident of Centre, Cherokee County, Alabama, appeared before R. R. Savage, Judge of Probate, to make application for a pension under the provisions of the act providing for war-widows of 1878. Patsey Sparks stated that she was 104 years old and that she was the widow of Leonard Sparks who had been a private in a company commanded by a Capt. Butler (she later substituted the name of Capt. Lockhart) in an infantry regiment commanded by Longstreet in the War of 1812. She stated that Leonard Sparks had been drafted near Dandridge in East Tennessee (which is in Jefferson County) in May 1812, and that after serving nearly 3 months, he died near Spartanburg, South Carolina, about July 30, 1812, as a result of a wound received in battle. (This date of death is in error, as will be explained in the Editor's note at the end of these abstracts; although it appears to be '1812' and was so interpreted by the Pension Office in their attempt to vertify it, it appears to have been marked over and perhaps was intended as '1832'.)

Patsey Sparks stated that at the time of his enlistment, Leonard Sparks was a 'tall, raw Boned man, with very black Hair with deep yellow eyes and High forehead.' She stated that she had been married to Leonard Sparks at Dandridge, Tennessee, in Dec, 1794, by Ben Bradford, a justice of the peace, although the marriage bond on record in Jefferson County, Tennessee, indicates the date was actually 1806. She stated that her maiden name had been Patsey Beard, and added that neither she nor her husband had been married previously, that she had never married again, and that she had lived in Jackson County and Cherokee County, Alabama, since his death. She also stated that she had never received bounty land nor a pension from the U.S. government. She appointed the legal firm of Savage, Matthews & Daniel as her attorneys. She signed her application by mark.

The witnesses to the application of Patsey Sparks were Elihu Sparks, who gave his age as 80, and Emiline Sparks, aged 48, both residents of Cherokee County, Alabama. Elihu Sparks stated he had known Patsey Sparks for 70 years and Emiline Sparks stated she had known her for 30 years. Elihu Sparks stated he 'has lived near her every since the War of 1812 in the same Neighborhood and near said Leonard for Eleven years before his death & Emaline Sparks has lived in the same Neighborhood of said Patsey for thirty years and has heard her speak of her said husband & about his being in the War of 1812 and his dying from a wound he received in a battle during said war many times.' Both Elihu and Emiline Sparks signed their names to this statement.. (From other records it is known that Elihu Sparks was actually a son of Patsey and that Emiline was his wife.)

When Patsey Sparks's lawyers submitted her application on January 2, 1883, they stated: 'You must know that the recollection of a Lady as old as she is, is feeble, hence the failure to remember the names of the officers and No. of Regiment &c. Elihu Sparks one of the witnesses, says that Leonard Sparks served under Gen. Jackson but the Blank don't require that to be stated hence it is left out. The old Lady is in a deplorable condition indeed and if anything can be done for her it would indeed be an act of kindness.'

On February 2, 1883, the Commissioner of Pensions wrote to Patsey Sparks saying that no record could be found of Leonard Sparks on the rolls of Capt. Butler's Company and suggested that she send the testimony of comrades who served in the same company or regiment with her husband, On February 11, 1883, Patsey Sparks replied to the Commissioner as follows:

'Centre P.O. Cherokee Co. Ala. February the 11 1883

to the Pension office Department. I have now Done my Best in making my Proof my Best Witness is ded and I Want you all to exammon the role of Capten Lockhart and see if you can find Mathew Norton & Elihu Beard & Mathew Sparks & Ring Sparks & Isac Brown for tha Was all in the same Company and a Part of theam got a land Warnt for thir Servaice and I have emploid Savage & Matthews & Daniel to get my Claim for I no that my hosband Was in the War of 1812 With the men I have named and I Want you all to look for the names that I have named you Will find Lenard Sparks name for I no that tha Was all in the Same Company and that Lenard Sparks Was in the War about four monts. [signed] Patsey Sparks.'

Note that in this letter, Patsey Sparks stated that the captain's name was Lockhart rather than Butler. Note also that, whereas she signed her application by mark, she signed her name to this letter. The letter itself, however, was probably written by someone else. With this letter, she sent the document that has been reproduced on the cover of this issue of the Quarterly. Unfortunately, we have not been able thus far to identify the signer of this statement. From his signature, it appears that his name was Ning Sparks, and in her letter of February 11, 1883, Patsey Sparks calls him Ning. This must have been a nickname. No record has been found of his receiving bounty land. He must have been closely related to Leonard Sparks and to Matthew Sparks with whom he mentioned having served. Perhaps all three were brothers. This document reads as follows:

'Cherokee Co Ala this to sertiffy that I no that the said Lenard Sparks Was in the War of 1812 and that he Was Wounded and dide in actule Service and that he Was in Servis about fore months and that he Was Wounded in the Battle of Bronstown if my memory servs me right, and the Captains name Was Lockhart if I ant forgot I Wont be Posative in the Captain name

[signed] Ning Sparks

to the Penson agent Pleas look for my name and for Mathew Norton and for Mathew Sparks and you Will find that We Did git a land Warnt for our Servaice and I think you Will finde Lenard Sparks name for We all Was in the same Company if his name ot on the role it ot to be

[signed] Ning Sparks'

From the records in this file, it is apparent that the Pension Office made an extensive search trying to find a record of Leonard Sparks's service, but they could neither find his name nor the names of any of his comrades as named by Patsey Sparks on the roll of any Tennessee regiment. In 1885 the Pension Office wrote to the postmaster of Centre, Alabama, to ask whether Pat sey Sparks were still living. The postmaster replied by saying: 'Mrs. Sparks has been dead 2 years, her husband Leonard Sparks is generally believed to have been in the War of 1812.' With this report, the Pension Office dropped its investigation.

(Editor's Note: Patsey Sparks was listed on the 1880 census of Cherokee County, Alabama, in the household of her son, Elihu Sparks. (In the 1880 census, relationship of each member of a household to the head of that household was indicated.) Patsey Sparks gave her age in 1880 as 101, thus it would appear she was born ca. 1780; she gave her birthplace as Tennessee, also indicating that both of her parents had been born in Tennessee. Elihu Sparks gave his age as 70 in 1880 (whereas in 1883 he stated he was 80), and indicated that he, as well as his father, had been born in South Carolina. Living with Elihu Sparks in 1880 was his wife, Emiline Sparks, aged 46 (she was probably his second wife), also a son named Elihu Sparks, aged 18 and born in Alabama, and a daughter, Sarah Sparks, aged 5 and also born in Alabama. Also living in the family was a Mary Sparks, aged 5, who was listed as a grandchild of Elihu Sparks. We have not had the 1860 or 1870 census of Cherokee County searched. In our search of the entire state of Alabama for 1850, this family did not appear.

In her pension application, Patsey Sparks stated that she and her husband, Leonard Sparks, had been married at Dandridge, Tennessee (Jefferson County), in Deoember, 1794. Her memory seems to have failed her regarding this date, for there is on file in Jefferson County, Tennessee, a marriage bond for Leonard Sparks and Patsey Beard dated July 25, 1806; Matthew Norton was bondsman. (There is als a marriage bond in Jefferson County for Thomas Sparks and Sally McClister dated November 6, 1816, with Leonard Sparks as bondsman.)

It is questionable that Patsey Sparks was correct about her husband's death in the War of 1812--since this date is not entirely clear in the application, she not even have intended that it read '18l2'--possibly she intended 1832. He may well have died many years later as a result of a wound received in the war.

There is little doubt but that Leonard Sparks belonged to the branch of the Sparks family that came from Maryland to Pittsylvania County, Virginia, in 1778. There was a Leonard Sparks (perhaps he was the father of Patsey's husband) who was born ca. 1763 and who was listed on the tax records of Pittsylvania County during the period 1783 to 1791, by 1797, he was a resident of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and by 1810 he was designated in the county records as 'Leonard Sparks, Sr.' He lived. on the Pacolet River on land that lay on the line between Union County and Spartanburg County. On a few deeds he is listed as a resident of Union County.

The name 'Leonard Sparks, Jr.' first appears in the land records of Spartanburg County in 1825 and in 1827 an Elihu Sparks signed as a witness to a deed of Leonard Sparks, Jr. In another deed, also dated 1827, the wife of Leonard Sparks, Jr., is designated as 'Patey Sparks.'

Although Leonard Sparks, Sr., was listed as a resident of Spartanburg County in the census of 1830 (aged between 70 and 80), Leonard Sparks, Jr., disappears from Spartanburg County records after 1827. Because an Elihu Sparks signed as witness to a deed of Leonard Sparks, Jr., in 1827, and Leonard Jr.'s wife's name was given as Patey, it seems rather probable that he was the same Leonard Sparks referred to in the above pension application, in spite of the fact that Patsey stated he died in l812. (Note she also stated she and Leonard were married in 1794 when in reality they were not married until 1806.) Of course, if the Leonard Sparks, of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, was the same Leonard Sparks who married Patsey Beard, he must have lived for a few years in Jefferson County, Tennessee. Actually, the distance between these two points is not much more than 100 miles.)

(These abstracts of bounty land and pension papers will be continued in future issues of the Quarterly)


Page 634-637
Whole Number 37

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

MADISON SPARKS, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, August 10, 1795; died in Owen County, Kentucky, August 13, 1873. Bounty Land Warrant File 23 398-80-55; Pension File SC 5 681.

On October 28, 1850, Madison Sparks, a resident of Owen County, Kentucky, appeared before a justice of the peace named Lewis White to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was fifty-five years old and that he had been a private in Capt. Peter Dudley's company in Col, Boswell's regiment in the War of 1812; that he had volunteered at Frankfort, Ky., in March, 1813, for a term of six months and was discharged at Seneca on September 12, 1813. He signed his name as 'Madison Sparks'; his signature was witnessed by B. Haydon and another whose name appears to have been S. F. J. Fralen. He was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land.

Madison Sparks submitted his written discharge as evidence of his service, and it has been preserved with his papers in the National Archives. It reads as follows: 'William Henry Harrison, Major-General and Commanding in Chief the North-Western Army of the United States: To all who shall see these presents, Greetings: Know ye, that Madison Sparks, a private soldier in Captain Dudley's company of the 10th regiment of Kentucky Militia is hereby honorably discharged the service on account of an attack of Bilious fever. Given under my hand and seal, at Head-Quarters, Seneca town this 12th day of September 1813. by the General, [signed] E. P. Gaines, Col. Actg. adjt. General.' War Department records revealed that Madison Sparks had joined Capt. Peter Dudley's company on March 29, 1813.

On March 31, 1855, Madison Sparks, still a resident of Owen County, Kentucky, appeared before a justice of the peace named M. B. Chinn to make application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 59 years old and gave his service in the War of 1812 as he had done on his earlier application. He signed his name as 'Madison Sparks'; Dennis byrns and T. Thornton signed as witnesses, stating that they were personally acquainted with Madison Sparks. On May 10, 1855, another portion of the application was filled out directing the Commissioner of Pensions to 'direct my Bounty Land to the care of J. P. Sparks at Pleasureville, Kentucky.' He was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

On March 30, 1871, Madison Sparks, a resident of Owen County, Ky., appeared before Thomas A. Ireland, clerk of the County Court, to make application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. He stated that he was 76 years old and that his wife, Fanny, was dead, that his post-office was Monterey in Owen County, and that he lived '2½ miles below Monterey, Ky. on River.' He gave his service in the War of 1812 as he had done on his bounty land applications. He appointed D. W. Lindsey of Frankfort, Ky., to be his lawful attorney. He signed his name as 'Madison Sparks'; Dennis byrns and James Fitzgerald, both of Owen County, signed as witnesses and stated that during the Civil War he had been loyal to the United States. W. T. Steele, deputy clerk of the County Court, also signed. Madison Sparks was issued a pension of $8.00 per month, effective as of February 14, 1871.

[Editor's Note: Madison Sparks was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks of Culpeper County, Va., and Owen County, Ky. (see the Quarterly of Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, p. 517). Madison Sparks was born August 10, 1795, and died August 13, 1873. He married (first) his first cousin, Fanny Sparks, daughter of Humphrey Sparks (marriage bond dated February 11, 1818, in Woodford County, Ky.). Fanny died soon after she and Madison were married; there were no children by this marriage. Madison Sparks married (second) Mrs. Winifred (Thomas) Stafford (marriage bond dated January 27, 1827, in Owen County, Ky.). She was the widow of Hiram Stafford; her father was Reuben Thomas. Winifred died March 20, 1867, in Owen County, Ky. Madison and Winifred (Thomas) Sparks were the parents of the following children:

1. Alvah Thomas Sparks, born January 8, 1828; died Oct, 1888.
2. Joseph Spencer Sparks, born May 12, 1830; died January 27, 1892.
3. George Washington Sparks, born June 4, 1831; died October 8, 1896.
4. Russell Hill Sparks, born May 5, 1833; died Dec, 1912.
5. Reuben Moore Sparks, born January 8, 1835; died April 17, 1902.
6. Canfield D. Sparks, born September , 1836; died August 18, 1837.
7. Jordan Sparks, born January 8, 1839; died October 1, 1864.
8. Lucy Sparks, born May 17, 1841; died January 26,1922.
9. Mary Sparks (this may have been the Sue Ann Sparks listed with the family of Madison Sparks on the 1850 census, aged 13).
10. William Henry Sparks, born 1844; died November 17, 1904.)

56.1 MARTIN SPARKS, born ca. 1783 in New York; a resident of Clark County, Illinois, in 1855. Bounty Land Warrant File 20 626-160-55.

On April 11, 1855, Martin Sparks, a resident of York, Clark County, Illinois, appeared before a justice of the peace named B. F. Robinson to make application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he had not applied under any previous act. He stated that he was 62 years old; that he had served in the War of 1812 as a'Second Sargent' in Capt. John McNaughton's company in the militia regiment commanded by Col. John McCleary; that he was ordered into service at Salem, New York, on or about September 5, 1814, and that he was discharged at Burlington, Vermont, in September , 1814; that he did not receive a discharge certificate. He signed his name as 'Martin Sparks'; Lewis 0. Schultz and Charles Gorham, both residents of Clark County, IL., signed as witnesses. A note from the 3rd Auditor's Office in this file reads: 'Martin Sparks served as a Segt. in Capt. Jno. McNaughton's Co., N.Y. Mil. from the 8th to the 22d day of September 1814--(were ordered to rendezvous on the 8th of September ‘14, & were discharged at Burlington on the 16th of September ‘14, being 120 miles from their respective places of residence, were mustered to the 22d of September ‘14.' Martin Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

MATTHEW SPARKS, born ca. 1790 in Baltimore County, Maryland. Bounty Land Warrant File 509-160-55.

On March 16, 1855, Matthew Sparks, a resident of Baltimore County, Maryland, appeared before a justice of the peace named William C. Vance to make application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was 65 years old; that he had been a private in the company commanded by Capt. Joseph Jenkins in the regiment of Maryland Cavalry commanded by Col. John Street in the War of 1812; that he had been drafted at Baltimore County on or about August 25, 1814, and was discharged at Baltimore on September 17, 1814. He signed the application as 'Matthew Sparks;' Benjamin Boley and Aaron Sparks (Aaron was Matthew's brother) signed as witnesses. Matthew Sparks requested that his warrant be forwarded to Charles W. Blackman of Georgetown, D.C., his agent. He was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Matthew Sparks was a son of Josiah Sparks, Jr. (ca.1752-1846), of Baltimore County, Md. See the Quarterly of June, 1958, Vol. VI, No. 2, for additional material on this family.)

17.2.2.1 MATTHEW B. SPARKS, born ca. 1780 in Pittsylvania County, Virginia; died in 1845 in Morgan County, IL. Widow, Nancy (Sutton) Sparks. Bounty Land Warrant File 67 251-160-55.

On July 7, 1855, Nancy Sparks, a resident of Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois, appeared before Matthew Stacy, clerk of the County Court, to make application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. She stated that she was 68 years old and that she was the widow of Matthew B. Sparks who she believed had been a private in a company commanded by Capt. Lynn in a regiment (the 7th she believed) of Virginia Militia volunteers commanded by Col. Sanders in the War of 1812. She stated that her husband had been either drafted or had volunteered in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, in August, 1814, for either 3 or 6 months; that he was honorably discharged at Norfolk, Va., in February or March, 1815. She stated that; she had been married to Matthew B. Sparks in Pittsylvania County, Va., in Dec, 1803, by Thomas Sparks, a minister of the Gospel, but she could not recall the day of the month; that her name before marriage had been Nancy Sutton. She stated that her husband had died in Morgan County, IL., on May 4, 1845. She added that she had applied for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850, through W. B, Warren of Jacksonville, IL., but had never received a warrant. She signed her application by mark. Ira Davenport and Thomas Sparks, residents of Morgan County, IL., witnessed Nancy's signature; both declared that they were well acquainted with Matthew B. Sparks in his lifetime and knew that he and Nancy had lived together as husband and wife; they stated that Matthew B. Sparks had died at Morgan County, IL., on or about May 4, 1845, and that Nancy was still his widow, Ira Davenport signed his name while Thomas Sparks signed by mark.

Accompanying the application of Nancy Sparks was a sworn statement made on May 7, 1857, by James Kirkman, a resident of Morgan County, IL. (age not given). He stated that he was personally acquainted with Matthew B. Sparks during his lifetime and with Nancy Sparks his wife; that Matthew B. Sparks died about May 4, 1845, and that he saw his body after he had died; that he had known Nancy ever since the death of her husband and knew her to be his widow.

Army records revealed that Matthew B. Sparks had served in Capt. Lynn's company of Virginia Militia from December 31, 1814, until February 22, 1815. Nancy Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note on preceding bounty land applications The marriage bond of 17.2.2.1 Matthew B. Sparks and Nancy Sutton is on file in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and is dated November 28, 1802; they were probably married early in Dec, 1802, rather than 1803 as stated by Nancy in her application. Matthew B. Sparks was a son of 17.2.2 Matthew and Kezia (Stone) Sparks as proved by a deed dated July 12, 1811. on file in Book 17, page 483, Pittsylvania County, Va. (see the Quarterly of March, 1956, Vol. IV, No. 1, page 118). From this deed we learn also that the elder 17.2.2 Matthew Sparks had died prior to July 12, 1811, and that he left children named, probably in the order of their birth:

17.2.2.1 Matthew B. Sparks;
17.2.2.2 Edmund Sparks, married Patsey Wright in 1804;
17.2.2.3 John Sparks, married Judah (Judy) Dodson in 1807;
17.2.2.4 Jane (Jinney) Sparks, married William Dunkan in 1811;
17.2.2.5 Nelly Sparks;
17.2.2.6 Nancy Sparks, married John Ware in 1811; and
17.2.2.7 Thomas Sparks.

Matthew Sparks, father of Matthew B., was born ca. 1750-60. There is little doubt but that he was a son of 17.2 Matthew (born ca.1711) and Eleanor Sparks (born ca. 1731) who were residents of Prince George's County and Frederick County, Maryland, before moving to Pittsylvania County, Va., in 1778. (See the Quarterly of September , 1955, Vol. III, No. 3, Pp. 79-85, and March, 1956, Vol. IV, No. 1, pp. 109-121, for further information on this family.

Matthew B. Sparks, son of Matthew and Kezia (Stone) Sparks, was born ca. 1780--in 1795 his father was taxed for two males over 16--himself and probably his eldest son, Matthew B. The 'B' in Matthew B. Sparks's name stood for 'Brooks'--on some Pittsylvania Ccunty tax records he was listed as 'Brooks Sparks.'

Matthew B. Sparks was still in Pittsylvania County, Va,, when the 1820 census was taken. At that time he seems to have had two sons born between 1803 and 1810; one daughter born ca. 1803; and one daughter born between 1803 and 1810. by 1830, Matthew B, Sparks, with his brother Edmund Sparks, had moved to Bedford County, Tennessee. From the enumeration of his family in 1830, it appears that Matthew B. Sparks had lost one of his sons born between 1803 and 1810, while another son had been born between 1825 and 1830. From Bedford County, Tenn., Matthew B. Sparks and his family apparently moved to Morgan County, Illinois, ‘where Matthew B. died May 4,1845.

Our only knowledge of the children of Matthew B. and Nancy (Sutton) Sparks pertains to their son Thomas Sparks who was born in Tennessee about 1827 according to the 1850 census. He signed (by mark) his mother's application in 1855. When the 1850 census was taken, Nancy was living with her son Thomas and his wife Sarah (born ca. 1832) and their one child, Harriet, born in 1849.)

(These abstracts of bounty land and pension papers will be continued in future issues of the Quarterly.)


Page 640-653
Whole Number 38

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS


MATHEW SPARKS, born ca. 1782 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia; enlisted at Bellefield, Va., in 1812; died about 1850 in Greene County, Indiana. Widow MARY SPARKS Bounty Land Warrant File 25 511-160-12.

Most of the papers in this file have been lost. Two of the papers remaining are letters written on November 14, 1853, by H. L, Livingston and A. L. Rhoads, both of Bloomfield, Indiana, on behalf of Mary Sparks, widow of Mathew Sparks. The only other document in the file is the written discharge of Matthew Sparks which has been reproduced on the cover of this issue of the Quarterly. The discharge reads as follows:

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN,

Know ye, That Matthew Sparks, a Private of captain Louring Hustin company Eighth regiment of Infantry who was enlisted the Twenty fifth day of May one thousand eight hundred and Twelve to serve Five Years is hereby Honorably Discharged from the Army of the United States by Reason of his tour of Service having Expired.

Said Matthew Sparks was born in Mecklenburgh county in the state of Virginia, is Thirty years of age, Five feet Ten and half inches high, Dark complexion, Dark eyes, Dark hair, and by occupation when enlisted a Farmer.

Given at Ross Christian, M.T. this Twenty fifth day of May 1817.

G. H. Hennerly, Lt.

Commanding.

The letters in this file written by Rhoads and Livingston read as follow:

"Bloomfield, Greene Co., Ind.

"November 14, 1853

"Dear Sir

"I must take the liberty of pressing upon your attention the claim of Mary Sparks, the widow of Matthew Sparks, who was a soldier in the regular army of 1812 for five years. He entered the service at Bellefield, Va., in the company commanded by Capt. Thos. M. Nelson, being enlisted by Lieutenant Walls, on the 25th day of May 1812, in the 10th (I think) Regiment commanded by Colonel Willbour. After the promotion of Capt. Nelson, he was under the command of Lieutenant Mountjoy until he was discharged. He was successively in the regiment commanded by Col. Wilbour, Colonel Nicholson, Col. Hamilton.

"Mary Sparks forwarded her papers and Declaration for bounty land about three years since. Nothing was heard from the Department until about eighteen months thereafter when the Commissioner of Pensions stated that the declaration had been referred to some office, I believe the 3rd Auditor, for examination, since which time she has not heard one syllable, though I have often troubled the officers of the Department with communications for her.

"If the papers are lost, I can forward new ones, I having in my possession the sworn declaration of Matthew Sparks made a short time before his death.

"Mrs. Sparks is old and very poor & needy. No one has a cents worth of interest in procuring her warrant, not even as to fees, and it most assuredly would be a great favor, if she could be informed why the warrant is not forthcoming, and when recd. will be of great assistance to her, in her old age and poverty.

Please give the matter your attention, and at least write that she may know the cause of the delay, and she may be able to hasten the investigation by some timely information.

"Hon. Comr of Pensions " Yours truly

"Washington D.C. A. L. Rhoads."

"Bloomfield, Indiana

"November 14th 1853

"Dear Sir.

"I have glanced over the letter of Mr. Rhoads on the subject of the Mrs. Mary Sparks, widow of Mathew Sparks, for bounty land under act of 28 September 1850. The statement I am satisfied is correct for I well remember making out the original declaration for Sparks in his lifetime which was not forwarded on account of his death. She is evidently entitled to bounty land and the statement of Sparks as contained in his declaration I am certain is correct for he was a person of strict truth.

"The representation made by Mr. Rhoads of her poverty is but too true. She [is] indigent & an object of commiseration, please give the subject your attention & if the papers are misplaced they can readily be supplied. If the claim is surpassed please write what is to [be] done.

"I am Sir with much

"S. P. Waldo, "Esteem your obdt. sevt.

"Comr. of Pensions." "H. L. Livingston."

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Mary Sparks received a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: There is no additional information in the Association's files on this Matthew Sparks. We know that there was a Sparks family in Mecklenburgh County, Virginia, because in a volume entitled Marriage Bonds of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, 1765-1810 the following bonds are listed:

William Sparks to Judith Thompson, 9 Jan, 1804. Bernard Thompson, Security.

Martha Sparks to Benjamin Bowen, 12 September 1803. Zachariah Yancy, Security.

Matthew Sparks was doubtless closely related to the above William and Martha Sparks. From the letters of Rhoads and Livingston, it appears that Matthew Sparks was living in Greene County, Indiana, in September , 1850, but died shortly thereafter. However, neither his nor his wife Mary's name was found when the 1850 census of Greene County was searched for persons named Sparks. Several other Sparks families were living in Greene County, however, according to the 1850 census and may have been related to Matthew and Mary.

(See the Quarterly of September , 1959, Vol. VII, No. 3, pp. 426-28.)

MATHEW SPARKS, born ca. 1790 in Baltimore County, Maryland; died May 12, 1874, in

Baltimore County. Widow, MARY JOHNSON SPARKS, born ca. 1826; died 1901. Pension File WC 17 221.

On May 11, 1878, Mary Sparks, widow of Mathew Sparks, made application for a pension under the act of March 9, 1878. In her application, she stated that she was 52 years old and a resident of Baltimore County, Maryland. She stated that her husband, Mathew Sparks, had served as a private in a company commanded by Capt. Joseph Jenkins in a cavalry regiment commanded by Col. John Street in the War of 1812; that he had been drafted in Baltimore County in the summer of 1814 and that he had served at least 14 days.

At the time of his enlistment, she stated that Mathew Sparks was about 26 years old; that he had been born At St. James Post Office in Baltimore Co.; that he was a farmer; that he was 5 feet 10 inches tall with blue eyes, black hair, and a light complexion. She stated that she and Mathew Sparks had been married in Baltimore City, Maryland, on January 10, 1849, by a Rev. Tibbit, a minister of the M.E. Church; that her name before her marriage was Mary Johnson and that neither she nor her husband had been married previously, She stated that Mathew Sparks died in Baltimore County on May 12, 1874, and that he had lived his entire life near St. James Church in Baltimore County, She stated that her husband had received a land warrant about 1854 for 160 acres, (His application was abstracted on page 636 of the Quarterly of March, 1962.) Mary Sparks signed her application by name; Isaac Standiford, aged 76, and William T, Perdue, aged 44, signed as witnesses.

Mary Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month, This was later increased to $12.00 and was paid until her death in 1901.

[Editor's Note: This abstract should have been combined with that of Mathew Sparks's application for bounty land which appeared on page 636 of the March, 1962, issue of the Quarterly, Mathew Sparks (sometimes spelled Matthew) was a son of Josiah Sparks, Jr,, (born ca. 1752, died 1846), of Baltimore County, Maryland, See the Quarterly of June, 1958, Vol, VI, No, 2, for additional material on this family.)

MATTHEW SPARKS, born ca. 1781; of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and Rockingham County, North Carolina. Bounty Land Warrant File 33 407-120-55.

On October 13, 1854, Matthew Sparks, a resident of Rockingham County, North Carolina, appeared before a justice of the peace named Joseph Holderby, to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 73 years old; that he had been an ensign in a company commanded by Lt. John Adams in the 4th Regt. of Virginia Militia commanded by Col. Greenhill in the War of 1812; that he was drafted at Beavers Tavern in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, on or about September 1, 1814, for six months and continued in service for about 3 months and 15 days and was honorably discharged at Camp Ellicott's Mills, Maryland, on December 1, 1814. He signed his application as "Mat Sparks." D. J. Rausley and John G. Wither (?) signed as witnesses. He was issued a land warrant (No. 102,051) for 40 acres.

On April 9, 1855, Matthew Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was a resident of Rockingham County, North Carolina, and was 74 years old. He gave his service in the War of 1812 as he had done in 1854. He again signed his name as "Mat Sparks." D. E. Guerrant and John Hudson, residents of Rockingham County, signed as witnesses. He was issued warrant No. 84,504 for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: This Matthew Sparks belonged to the Sparks family of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, on which a considerable amount of data were published in the Quarterly of September , 1955, and March, 1956. He was probably the Matthew Sparks whose marriage bond with Mary Vaughan, daughter of William Vaughan, is dated December 28, 1818, and is on file in Pittsylvania County. Matthew Sparks moved to Rockingham County, North Carolina, about 1846 (see the Quarterly of September , 1956, Vol. IV, No, 3, p. 162), He and his wife, Mary, were listed on the 1850 census of Rockingham County (see the Quarterly of Dec, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 4, p. 603). The S. P. Sparks, aged 21, living with Matthew and Mary in 1850 was probably a son. The M. T. Sparks, aged 26, and the William H. Sparks, also aged 26, who were listed on the 1850 census of the same county, were probably also sons.)

MOSES SPARKS, born ca. 1789, in Jefferson County, Kentucky; died in 1858, in Collin County, Texas. Bounty Land Warrant File 17180-160-55.

On August ll, 1851, Moses Sparks, a resident of Collin County, Texas, appeared before a justice of the peace to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 62 years old and that he had served as a private in a company commanded by Capt. John Biggart or Biggard in a regiment of volunteers in the War of 1812; that he had volunteered at Charleston, Indiana (in Clark County) on or about June 4, 1814, for one year and had been honorably discharged on June 4, 1815. He stated that he had not received a written discharge. (War Department records revealed that he actually served from June 1, 1814, to June 1, 1815.) He signed his application as "Moses Sparks." He was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land in May, 1852.

[Editor's Note: Ray M. Sparks, 2206 Junius, San Angelo, Texas, is a great-grandson of Moses Sparks and has supplied a considerable amount of material on Moses Sparks and his descendants. Moses Sparks was born ca. 1789 in Jefferson County, Kentucky, and died December 20, l858 in Collin County, Texas. Moses Sparks was a son of James Sparks (1743-1834) whose Revolutionary War pension papers were published in the September , 1954, issue of the Quarterly (Vol. II, No. 3). (James Sparks was a son of Richard Sparks of Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and later of Rosstraver Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Moses Sparks married Elizabeth who was born in Kentucky about 1795. On May 255 1813, Moses Sparks was among a group of settlers of Driftwood, Harrison County, Indiana, who signed a petition to Congress requesting that his brother, Stephen Sparks, be permitted to erect a water grist mill and saw mill. We know from his bounty land application that Moses Sparks enlisted in 1814 in Charleston, Clark County, Indiana. by 1820 he had moved to Jackson County, Indiana, where his father also lived from about the same date until his death in 1834.

According to a deed recorded in Jackson County Deed Book C, page 365, on April 27, 1833, Moses Sparks and his wife, Elizabeth, gave a plot of land "to Major Cummings, James Brown and Benjamin Newkirk, trustees of the Baptist Meeting House, for the purpose of erecting a church." According to the agreement, the trustees were permitted to select a day and a night to be set aside for their meetings, but all other religious organizations were likewise to be permitted to use the land for religious purposes. The land was given "in consideration of the love and affection that Moses Sparks and wife have for the church." Sometime after 1842, Moses and his family moved to Texas, probably by way of Missouri. by 1850 he was a resident of Collin County, Texas. Moses and Elizabeth Sparks were the parents of several children, born in Indiana between 1817 and 1834. We know the names of only four:

Richard Sparks, born ca. 1826, died 1866; married Emily Eliza Bell.

Sarah Sparks, born 1828.

A.J. Sparks, born 1832.

Elizabeth Sparks, born 1834.

MOSES S. SPARKS, born ca. 1813; a resident of Lowades County, Mississippi, in 1836 and of Panola County, Mississippi, in 1855. Bounty Land Warrant File 33 627-160-55.

On April 21, 1855, Moses S. Sparks, a resident of Panola County, Mississippi, appeared before an acting justice of the peace named William Herring and made application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. Moses S. Sparks stated that he was 42 years old and that he had been a private in the company of Mississippi volunteers commanded by Capt. Prior M. Grant in the War with the Comanche Indians in 1836. He stated that he had volunteered in Lowndes County, Mississippi, on or about August 8, 1836, marched to Jackson, Mississippi, and was mustered into the service of the U.S. by Major General Dunlap about five or six days later; he stated he had been discharged in Oct, 1836, in Lowndes County. He appointed Wylie P. Wootten of Panola, Mississippi, to be his attorney. He signed his name as "Moses S. Sparks." Orville Harmon, aged 49, and Michael T. Wright, aged 28, both of Ponola County, signed as witnesses; they stated they had known Moses S. Sparks for several years. He was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

NATHAN F. SPARKS, born ca. 1810 in Tennessee; resident of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, before 1836 and until death removal to Anderson County, Texas, between 1850 and 1855; a resident of Johnson County, Texas, in later years. Bounty Land Warrant File 52 454-120-55.

On May 28, 1851, Nathan F. Sparks, a resident of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, appeared before a justice of the peace named Luke Davenport, to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 40 years old and that he had served as "4th corporal in a Company commanded by Capt. John H. Brodnax, an Independant Volunteer Horse Company know: as the Tallassee Guards in the War with the Creek Tribe of Indians in the year A.D. 1836." He stated that he had volunteered in Tallapoosa County sometime between May 4th and 27th, 1836, for 3 months and was discharged at Tallassee in Tallapoosa County on or about the last day of July 1836; that he did not receive a written discharge. (War Department records proved that he served from May 4 to August 6, 1836.) He signed his application as "Nathan F. Sparks." He appointed John A. Jordan,an attorney of Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, Alabama, as his attorney. He was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On April 25, 1855, Nathan F. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He was now a resident of Anderson County, Texas, and he made application for bounty land before a justice of the peace named Morris R. Reagan. He gave no additional information regarding his service. He signed as "Nathan F. Sparks"; Wiley H. Bowen and John L. Bailey signed as witnesses. He was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

[Editor's Note: Nathan F. Sparks was born in Tennessee about 1810, and was a son of John Sparks (1784-1836) and his wife, Sarah (Brooks) Sparks (born 1788, died in the 1860's). John Sparks had served in the same company as his son, Nathan F., in the Indian War of 1836 and in 1854 Nathan made a statement in support of his mother's claim for bounty land (see the Quarterly of September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, p. 581). Nathan F, Sparks married Elizabeth Taylor on March 16, 1836, in Montgomery County, Alabama. Elizabeth apparently died, because his wife's name on the 1850 census of Tallapoosa County was given as "Sarah E. A." aged 28 (see the QIJARTERLY of March, 1959, Vol. VII, No. 1, p. 378).

Three children were listed with Nathan F. Sparks in 1850: Virginia T. Sparks, aged 13; Frances D. Sparks, aged 10; and Nathan F. Sparks, aged 4. Virginia and Frances were probably daughters by his first wife. by 1870, Nathan F. Sparks was living in Johnson County, Texas, and one other child was listed, a son named John T. Sparks, born ca. 1859. Nathan F. Sparks was still living in 1880--he was listed on the Johnson County, Texas, census of that year as a hotel keeper and farmer in Alvarado Village; he gave his age as 67 while his wife, Sallie C. Sparks, was listed as 50 years old. Their son, John T. Sparks, aged 21, was still living at home, as was an "adopted daughter" named Zellah Lee, aged 14.)

NIMROD SPARKS, born ca. 1790, in Washington County, Pennsylvania; died January 20, in Jefferson County, Kentucky; married Susan B. Parker in Jefferson County, Kentucky, on February 26, 1826. Bounty Land Warrant File 88 027-160-55 (in the name of Norval W. Sparks, son of Nimrod.)

On May 13, 1859, Susan B. Ball, formerly widow of Nimrod Sparks, signed a statement on behalf of her son, Norval W. Sparks, to enable him to receive bounty land on the basis of the service of his father in the War of 1812. Susan B. Ball was a resident of Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, at the time she made her statement. She stated that she was formerly the wife of Ninrod Sparks--that they were married in Jefferson County, Kentucky, by a preacher named James Ward--she did not give the date of their marriage, but another record revealed that it was February 26, 1826.

She stated that her maiden name was Susan B. Parker. She stated that her husband "told me that he was born And (partly or entirely) raised in Washington County, Pennsylvania--that his parents died when he was a child, and that he lived with an uncle, and that before he was fully grow:: he left his uncle, and sometime afterwards enlisted into the Regular Army of the United States same time during [the] War of 1812." She stated that he had lost; his discharge. (Documents in the Adjutant General's Office proved that Nimrod Sparks had enlisted as a private in Capt. Baker's Company, 3rd Infantry Regiment, on January 26,1815, for five years, but was discharged on June 10, 1816 as being "unfit for service." She stated that "before he entered the Army he had begun to learn the trade of tanning leather." She stated that his hair was light or auburn, his eyes were blue, complexion fair, had a high forehead and that "he was lame at times--especially when much fatigued." She could not remember for sure, but she thought he was discharged because of his lameness. She added: "He spoke in his lifetime of trying to get a Land Warrant, and said that if he had not lost his papers he would have no trouble." She said that "Hon. W. J. Graves (now deceased) our representative in Congress, made some effort for him." She added: "My former husband, said Nimrod Sparks, was never married before he married me, at least he so informed me and I never had any doubt of the truth of his statements and I was the only wife that he ever had. We had two children only, Viz: (1) George W. Sparks, born May 2nd l830 and who died without issue (never having been married) December 12th 1850; (2) Norvall W. Sparks, born April 29th 1835." She stated that Norvall was living in Louisville at the time she was writing. "After the death of said husband I remained his widow until November 15th 1842 when I married Henry L.Ball whose wife I now am. My said first husband died in this county on the 20th day of January 1840." She signed her statement as "Susan B. Ball."

J. M. Stephens witnessed Susan's signature and added a certified copy of the entries in Nimrod Sparks's family Bible. The dates of birth of the two sons, George W. and Norval, correspond to those given by Susan, as do the dates of death of George W. and Nimrod. The only additional data is the record of marriage of "N. W. Sparks to Jennie M. Terrell, February 25th 1858."

Also in this file is a sworn statement by Richard P. Lightburne, dated May 16, 1859, in Louisville. He stated he was 52 years old and that he had been intimately acquainted with Ninrod Sparks, that "he was a reputed soldier of the service of the United States--War of 1812. ... I remember that he was reputed and believed to have come from Pennsylvania," He also stated that he was positive that Ninrod and Susan had been married.

Norval W. Sparks made application for bounty land on May 18, 1859. He gave no information about his parents or himself besides what had been given in his mother's statement. He signed his name as "Norval W. Sparks." His mother and Richard P. Lightburn signed as witnesses.

A certificate was signed on May 18, 1859, by T. Jack Conn, Deputy Clerk of Jefferson County Court, to the effect that "it appears by the records of my office that Nimrod Sparks and Susan Parker were married on the 26th day of February 1826 by Revd James Ward."

Norval W. Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land on the basis of his father's service.

[Editor's Note: Although we have an extensive file on the Sparks family of Washington County, Pennsylvania, we do not find Nimrod Sparks's name among these records. The fact that his parents died while he was a child will probably make it difficult to trace his ancestry, The marriage bond of Nimrod and Susan, which is on file in Jefferson County, Kentucky, reveals that Susan was a daughter of Thomas Parker who gave his consent to the marriage. Several deeds are on file for the purchase and sale of property in Louisville by Nimrod Sparks. The inventory of the property owned by Nimrod at the time of his death has been preserved; included were: "1 negro boy, Jim valued at $600.00; 1 woman and child, Susan and Alice, valued at $400 .00; and 1 boy, Jackson, valued at $500.00.")

ORSON SPARKS, born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, about 1791, son of Daniel & Sarah Sparks; resided in Bullitt County, Kentucky; moved to Clark County, later Scott County, Indiana, following War of 1812; returned to Bullitt County, later Spencer County, Kentucky; about 1830 moved to Marion County, Missouri; died there 1870. Bounty Land Warrant File 55 520-120-55. MARGARET (BURDITT) SPARKS, widow of Orson Sparks, Pension File WC 10 414.

(Editor's Note: Before giving abstracts of the documents in the file of Orson Sparks's claim for bounty land, it is of interest to note that in May, 1827, Orson Sparks made a claim against the United States government for a horse that he had lost while serving as a private in the company commanded by Capt. John Homback in the regiment commanded by Col. John Thomas in the War of 1812. The documents connected with this claim were published as Report No. 83 of the House of Representatives, 20th Congress, 1st Session. In a statement made in Bullitt County, Kentucky May 27, 182?, John Hornbeck swore that Sparks had been a private in his company and that "he served the campaign up the Wabash river... That the said Sparks' horse was valued, as deponent believes, at forty-five dollars; that the horse was lost while in the service of the United States without the fault of the said Sparks, that the government did not furnish forage or food for the horses on said campaign. After they crossed the Wabash river, the horse became lame, and could not travel, and, in consequence, was lost." On May 30, 1827, Orson Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace in Bullitt County, Kentucky, and stated that following his service in the War of 1812, he left the state of Kentucky in March, 1813, and did not return until "about three years since," that is, about 1824. He added that he "did not know until lately, that he was entitled to pay for said horse."

In House Report No. 27, 20th Congress, 2d Session, dated December 31, 1828, there appears a statement by an auditor from the Treasury Department as follows: "...it has been found that Capt. Hornbeck's company was in the United States' service 43 days from the 18th September , 1812; that on his muster roll, dated on the 29th of that month, Sparks is described as having private property, to wit: a horse, saddle, bridle, rifle, pouch, horn, tomahawk, and scalping knife, valued in the aggregate at $55.62; that, on his muster roll, dated the 3Oth Oct, 1812, there is an entry opposite Sparks's name, in a column headed 'losses of public and private property, in this form--'crippled and left 20th Oct, 1812'," A bill was introduced in Congress to reimburse Orson Sparks, but whether it passed or not has not been determined.)

On August 9, 1852, Orson Sparks, a resident of Marion County, Missouri, appeared before a justice of the peace to make application for bounty land under the act of April 28, 1850. He had made application earlier, but the papers had been lost. He stated that he was 61 years old and that he had served as a private in Capt. Patterson's company in a regiment of Kentucky Militia "in the war between the United States and Aaron Burr in 1806 & 7--That he was drafted in said service at Shelby County, Kentucky, on or about the month of Dec, 1806." He stated he had served for 30 days and had "received a printed and written discharge from said service at Union Encampment in Jefferson County, Kentucky." He stated that he had submitted this discharge with his application in 1850, but it had been lost. He stated that he volunteered at Bullard (i.e. Bullitt) County, Kentucky, in "September 1811 in a Ranging Company commanded by Captain Craven Peyton ---that he continued in actual service in this command for about six weeks and was honorably discharged from said service at Louisvil1e, Kentucky, in the month of Nov, 1811, that he was called out a second time in said servive in the month of August in 1812 and continued in actual service in said company co'mmanded by the said Captain Peyton for the space of about two months. That he volunteered at Vincennes, Indiana, in September , 1812 and ... continued in actual service for the space of one month in Captain Homback's Company of Mounted troops ... he was honorably discharged at Vincennes, Indiana, in the month of Oct, 1812." He added that his discharge from this service had been lost with his application in 1850. He signed his name as "Orson Sparks." He was issued land warrant No. 80,704 for 40 acres of bounty land.

On May 7, 1855, Orson Sparks, still a resident of Marion County, Missouri, made application for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 64 years; he gave no additional data on his service. He signed again as "Orson Sparks." William P. Harrison and Lloyd P, Hallack, residents of Marion County, signed as witnesses. Orson Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

Orson Sparks died in Marion County, Missouri, on May 15, 1870. His widow applied for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. There was some confusion regarding her identity and her signature and the result was that a great many letters and documents constitute her file. Only the most important are abstracted below.

On August 28, 1873, Margaret Sparks, a resident of "near Sharpsburg in the County of Marion and state of Missouri" appeared before the clerk of the County Court to make application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. She stated that she was 80 years old and was the widow of Orson Sparks. She stated that her husband "went to the war from Bullitt County, Kentucky, and served two terms," but she could not remember the names of his officers, She stated that her maiden name had been Peggy Burditt; that she was called Margaret and Peggy interchangeably; that she and Orson Sparks had been married on September 3, 1811, in Bullitt County, Kentucky, by Simeon Hall, Minister, She stated that her husband had died near Sharpsburg, Missouri, on May 15, 1870. She sigred her application by mark. Her witnesses were Samuel Sparks, Mary Jane Sparks, and Benjamin Davies. Accompanying her application was a sworn statement of the clerk of the Bullitt County Court to the effect that a record of the marriage of Orson Sparks and Peggy Burditt, dated September 3, 1811, was on file in the marriage register.

Because of the inability of Margaret Sparks to recall her husband's service and because of the confusion resulting from the loss of Orson Sparks's first application for bounty land, the Commissioner of Pensions questioned her identity. In an attempt to identify her husband, Margaret Sparks sent some old notes and receipts which were in her husband's handwriting. One of these reads: "Settlement on the 5 of September 1842 with Orson Sparks and James W, Sparks a balance due Orson Sparks of three hundred and fifty two Dollars and 19 Cents September 1842; April 1842 paid by Orson Sparks to Charles Coxts [?] for James W. Sparks $12 Dollars."

On February 28, 1874, Daniel McLeod, a resident of Marion County, Missouri, signed a sworn statement that he had been acquainted with Orson and Margaret Sparks and that they had lived together as man and wife. He stated thst he was "also acquainted with their children, among whom are Daniel K. and his brother Samuel Sparks." He also testified that "Orson Sparks departed this life at his home, on his farm, in this said county and state on or about the middle of May A.D. 1870," and that his sons, Daniel K. Sparks and Samuel Sparks, were administrators of his estate.

Also on February 28, 1874, John W, How, a resident of Marion County, Missouri, stated that he had been acquainted with Orson and Margaret Sparks and that they had lived together as husband and wife.

In spite of these sworn statements and records, the application of Margaret Sparks was rejected on March 24, 1874. However, when a more liberal pension law was passed on March 9, 1878, Margaret Sparks asked that her application be reconsidered. On July 13, 1878, James B. Young, aged 72, and Washington S, Colvert, aged 67, of Marion County, Missouri, made affidavits regarding the identity of Margaret Sparks. They stated that they were near neighbors.

Margaret Sparks usually signed her name with a mark and the Pension Office now questioned her identity because of this. On September 23, 1878, she made a sworn statement that she was "very old and infirm, often being confined to her bed with disease and infirmity--that in consequence, as she resides in the country and is unadvised by counsel, she attaches her name to written instruments sometimes by her own hand with a scrawl, sometimes her daughter in law, Mary H. Sparks, the wife of her son, Daniel K. Sparks, with whom she lives and makes her home writes it by her request when too feeble to do it herself." She signed this statement by mark in the presence of C. B. Layton, Justice of the Peace. Daniel K. Sparks and his wife, Mary H. Sparks, also made sworn statements that they had sometimes signed documents for her "by her special personal request."

On October 17, 1878, Margaret Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month effective as of March 9, 1878. How long she lived after this date is not know.

[Editor's Note: Orson Sparks was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, about 1791. He was a son of Daniel and Sarah Sparks. (Perhaps they were the Daniel Sparks and Sarah Bogard, daughter of Jacob Bogard, whose marriage was recorded in Mason County, Kentucky, on November 9, 1789.) Daniel Sparks was born ca. 1765 and was probably a son of Richard Sparks who lived near Cranbury, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and about 1760 moved to what became Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Daniel Sparks then moved to Jefferson County, Kentucky, sometime prior to 1782. He lived in that portion of Jefferson County that became Bullitt County in 1796.

Following the War of 1812, he moved to Clark County, Indiana, settling in that area that became Scott County in 1820. He died about 1820. Daniel and Sarah Sparks were the parents of a large number of children, not all of whom can be identified positively. A probate court order dated October 31, 1820, in Scott County, Kentucky, serves to identify their youngest children: Orson Sparks was appointed guardian of several of his brothers and sisters designated as the "infant and orphan heirs of Daniel Sparks." These were listed as: Harmon Sparks, born December 1, 1803; Elizabeth Sparks, born 4 February 1807; Nancy Sparks, born April 1, 1810; Catherine Sparks, born February 13, 1812; and Hannah Sparks, born December 28, 1813.

Other children of Daniel and Sarah Sparks are believed to have been Samuel K. Sparks, Valentine Sparks, William Sparks and perhaps Hector Sparks and Elijah Sparks. It appears from the 1810 census that Daniel and Sarah Sparks had 7 sons and 4 daughters.

Orson Sparks, one of the oldest sons of Daniel and Sarah Sparks, married Margaret Burditt in Bullitt County, Kentucky, on September 3, 1811. They moved with Orson's father to Indiana following the War of 1812 and it was there that their son, Daniel K. Sparks, was born January 20, 1820. In 1821, Orson Sparks moved back to Bullitt County, Kentucky, settling in the area that became Spencer County in 1824. In 1830 he moved to Marion County, Missouri, where he remained until his death on May 15, 1870. Although Orson and Margaret (Burditt) Sparks had several children, only two sons are know: at this time: (1) Daniel K. Sparks, born January 20, 1820; married Mary H. _______; he was living in 1884 and was a Methodist; (2) Samuel Sparks, born in Marion County, Missouri, March 16, 1836; he married Paulina Young and had one son, Hiram B. Sparks, born in 1872.)

RANDALL SPARKS, born ca. 1778; died 1830; of Gloucester County, New Jersey. Bounty Land Warrant File 3 509-120-55. Widow, REBECCA (STETSER) SPARKS, born ca. 1794; Pension File WC 2 111.

On December 31, 1850, Rebecca Sparks, a resident of Camden County, New Jersey, appeared before a justice of the peace named Jonathan Burr to make application for bounty land on the basis of the service of her husband, Randall Sparks, under the act of September 28, 1850. She stated that she was 56 years old; that her maiden name had been Rebecca Stetser, and that she had been married to Randall Sparks in Woodbury, New Jersey, on February 4, 1813, and that Randall Sparks had died at Camden, New Jersey, on July 12, 1830. She stated that he had served as a lieutenant in a company commanded by Robert L. Armstrong in the regiment of New Jersey Volunteers know: as the "Woodbury Blues" commanded by Col. Joshua L. Howell, in the War of 1812; that her husband had volunteered at Woodbury, New Jersey, on or about August 20, 1814. She signed her name as "Rebecca Sparks." The witnesses to her signature were Joseph Stetser and Catharine McCullon (?), residents of Camden County, New Jersey, and they stated that they had know: Rebecca Sparks before and after her marriage to Randall Sparks and that "the said Rebecca had children born by him the said Randall Sparks."

To prove her marriage, Rebecca Sparks sent her marriage certificate along with her application. This has been preserved and reveals that the marriage was performed in Gloucester County on February 4, 1813, by a justice of the peace named James Matlack. On this marriage certificate the names are given as "Captain Randle Sparks and Miss Rebecca Stetcher."

Army records revealed that Randall Sparks served as a private in Capt. R. L. Armstrong's Company in Col. J. L. Howell's regiment and that he volunteered on August 20, 1814, and was discharged on December 20, 1814. Rebecca Sparks was issued a warrant (No. 60,021) for 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 20, 1855, Rebecca Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. She made the application in Philadelphia, but stated that she was a resident of South Camden, Camden County, New Jersey, and was 61 years old. She gave essentially the same information regarding her husband's service as in the earlier application, but stated he had been a private whereas in 1850 she stated he had been a lieutenant. She signed her name as "Rebeak Sparks." Anne Ross and Sarah Sparks signed as witnesses. Their relationship to Rebecca is not stated. She was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

On August 7, 1871, Rebecca Sparks appeare4 before a clerk of a court of record in Philadelphia to make application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. She stated that she was a resident of No. 330 Division St., Camden, New Jersey, and was 86 years old. She signed by mark. Her mark was witnessed by Ann Ross and Kesiah Stetser. Her application was approved and she was given a pension of $8.00 per month commencing February 14, 1871.

[Editor's Note: Randall Sparks was born ca. 1778. He was a son of the Hon. John Sparks (born 1716-17, died 1802) and his third wife, Ruth, daughter of Alexander Randall. (See the QARTERLY of March, 1958, Vol. VI, No. 1, p. 286.] Randall Sparks's full name was Alexander Randall Sparks, but he was always know simply as Randall Sparks. He was obviously named for his mother's father, Alexander Randall. He was married twice, first to Ann Clark on November 24, 1803, in Gloucester County, New Jersey. She died in 1811 and he married, second, Rebecca Stetser on February 4, 1813.

According to an account of this family by Francis Bazley Lee in his Genealogical and Memorial History of the State of New Jersey (New York, 1910), Randall Sparks had children by his first wife: Ruth Sparks 1805; William Sparks, born 1805, died young; John C. Sparks, born 1807, Mary Sparks, born1808; William C. Sparks, born 1809; and Annie Sparks, born 1810. See the Quarterly of September , 1957, Vol.V, No. 3, p. 243, for the sketch of Randall Sparks1s life given by Mr. Lee. Mr. Lee made no mention of children by his second wife, but it will be noted above that the witnesses to Rebecca's application of 1850 stated that she had had children by Randall Sparks.)

REUBEN SPARKS, born 1792, died 1848-49, son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks; resident of Boone County, Kentucky. ROSA or ROSANNA (WORLD or WORRELL) SPARKS, widow of Reuben. Bounty Land Warrant File 72 766-160-55.

On April 27, 1857, Rosa Sparks, a resident of Boone County, Kentucky, appeared before a justice of the peace named John Alloway to make application for bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. She stated that she was 61 years old and that she was the widow of Reuben Sparks who had been a private in the company commanded by Capt. Hickman in the Kentucky regiment of volunteers, "or drafted men," commanded by Col. Dudley in the War of 1812. She stated that her husband had volunteered at Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1812 or 1813 for the term of 6 months and was honorably discharged at the end of his term. (Treasury Department records revealed that Reuben Sparks served in Capt. Pascal Hickman's company of Kentucky Militia from August 15, 1812, to March 5, 1813.)

She stated that she and Reuben Sparks had been married in Boone County, Kentucky, on December 29, 1836, by William whitaker, "a preacher." She stated that her maiden name had been Rosa World. She stated that Reuben died "at home in Boone County, Ky., on the 28th day of February A.D. 1848-9 and that she is now a widow." She asked that the warrant be mailed "to the care of J. P. Sparks, Owentow, Ky." She signed her name by mark. The witnesses to her signature were James N. Early and Joseph Hoffman, both residents of Boone County. Both stated that they were well acquainted with Reuben Sparks and Rosa Sparks and that they had lived together as husband and wife and that Reuben had died February 28, 1848-9.

Along with her application, Rosa Sparks sent a statement she had obtained from I. G. Hamilton, Clerk of the County Court, to the effect that a record was on file that Reuben Sparks and Rosanna Worrell were married on December 29, 1836, by William Whitaker, a minister of the Gospel. Added to this statement is the following noted signed by J. P. Sparks, attorney for Rosa Sparks: "P.S. I have written her name in the declaration Rosa instead of Rosanna and World instead of Worrell as written in this certificate above." Rosa Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Reuben Sparks was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks and was born September 30, 1792, in Madison County, Virginia (See Quarterly of Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, page 517.) He moved with his parents to Owen County, Kentucky. When his father, Henry Sparks, made his will on August 23, 1827, he stated that he had earlier given Reuben 100 acres of land "where Samuel Horton formerly resided," but he left him also "50 acres of my farm where I now reside to include the field in the river bottom which is now enclosed with a stone fence and upland so as to make his 50 acres and if he should be without issue or never return (being at this time absent from the state) then and in that case the same is to be sold and equally divided between my three daughters."

Nothing has been learned regarding the descendants of Reuben and Rosa Sparks except that Mrs, Henry J. Miller a descendant of Reuben's brother, Madison Sparks, stated a number of years ago that Reuben had a son named Jordan Sparks who was a school mate of Abraham Lincoln. Perhaps this was the J. P. Sparks who acted as Rosa1s attorney. On the 1850 census of Boone County, Rosa was listed as "Rosley Sparks," aged 55 and born in Virginia. She was then living with Julia Miller (aged 26) who may have been a daughter. The only other Sparks found on the 1850 census of Boone County was James Sparks, aged 16, living with Nancy Howell, aged 43. (See the Quarterly of March, 1957, Vol, V, No. 1, page 207.))

71. REUBEN H. SPARKS, born ca. 1777; died July 15, 1855; resident of Abingdon, Washington County Virginia; married Sarah L. McClellan in Sullivan County, Tennessee, September 14, 1807; resident of Washington County, Tennessee, by 1850.

Pension File WC 9 & BL Wt. 11 641-80-55.

On November 22, 1850, Reuben H. Sparks, a resident of Jonesborough, Washington County, Tennessee, appeared before a justice of the peace named W. H. Smith to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 73 years old; that he had been a private in the company know: as the "Bucktail Riflemen" commanded by Capt. Henry St. John Dixon in a regiment of Virginia volunteers commanded by Major Charles Fenton Mercer in the War of 1812; that he was first stationed at Major Nemin's (?) near Norfolk, later at Widow Collins near Norfolk, as a guard between the Bay Shore and Norfolk. He stated that he had volunteered at Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia, on March 8, 1814, for 3 months and was honorably discharged at the Widow Collins, near Norfolk, on July 5, 1814. He stated "that he has not seen his discharge for the last thirty years, having lost, or mislaid it."

He signed his name as "Reuben H. Sparks ." Records in the Treasury Department proved that he had served as he had stated. He was issued a warrant (No. 8,484) for 40 acres of bounty land.

On April 6, 1854, Reuben H. Sparks, still a resident of Washington County, Tennessee, now aged 77, applied for additional bounty land under an act dated March 22, 1852. He stated he had volunteered in Abingdon, Virginia, on March 8, 1814, and that "he started from that place under Capt. H. St. John Dickson, under Cols. White & Preston, enrolled as a private in said company, marched in an 'organized form' from sd. place -- Abingdon to Norfolk, a distance of 400 miles, or thereabouts, ... & having served at Norfolk where he was mustered into service, the term of three months, he was then (at Norfolk) regularly and honorably discharged on the 5th of July 1814, as he has heretofore declared, a distance of 400 miles, as above stated, from Abingdon, Washington Co., Va., where he resided which would allow him within 3 days of four months actual service, and 40 days mileage, under the last recited act. He therefore claims an additional land warrant for 40 acres." He signed as "Reuben H. Sparks" before W. H. Smith, Justice of the Peace. He was issued Warrant No. 99,529 for 40 additional acres of bounty land.

On April 10, 1855, Reuben H. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He was still a resident of Washington County, Tennessee, and gave his age as 78. He signed his name as "Reuben H. Sparks" and F. F. Wattenboyer and A. G. Graham, both of Washington County, signed as witnesses.

Reuben H. Sparks died shortly after making the above application and on August 21, 1855, his widow, Sarah L. Sparks, made application for the bounty land to which he was entitled under the act of March 3, 1855. She stated she was 66 years old and that she had married Reuben H. Sparks in Sullivan County, Tennessee, on September 14, 1807, by a Mr. Tipton, a justice of the peace, and that her name before marriage was Sarah L. McClellan. She stated that her husband had died July 15, 1855. She signed her name as "Sarah L. Sparks"; Jeremiah Boyd and William R. Boyd, both residents of Jonesboro, Tennessee, signed as witnesses, stating that they had known Reuben and Sarah before Reuben's death, and that they had lived together as husband and wife. Sarah L. Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land.

On June 6, 1872, Sarah L. Sparks applied for a pension on the basis of her husband's service under the act of February 14, 1871. She was a resident of Washington County, Tennessee, and gave her age as 82. Since, under this act, a widow was required to provide proof of her marriage to a soldier of the War of 1812, Sarah stated that the record of her marriage in Sullivan County had been destroyed by the burning of the court house in 1863. She stated that she and Reuben H. Sparks had been married at Blountville, Sullivan County, Tennessee, on September 14, 1807, and along with her application she sent a sworn statement by W. S. Mahoney and John A.Wilds of Washington County that they had examined the family Bible of Mrs. Sparks and that it contained the entry: "Reuben H. Sparks and Sarah L. McClellan were married September 14th 1807." She signed her application as "Sarah L. Sparks", Jas. A. Dillsworth and Jeremiah Boyd, residents of Jonesboro, signed as witnesses.

Apparently William A. Sparks, a son of Reuben and Sarah, wrote to his Congressman, W. G. Brownlow, asking that he testify to the marriage of his parents. Brownlow wrote to William A. Sparks from Knoxville on June 5, 1871, saying that he had "no doubt about the marriage of your father and mother, but am unable to testify on the subject. They were married in 1807 and I was born in 1805, and was therefore two years old."

The application of Sarah L. Sparks was approved on June 14, 1871, and a pension of $8.00 per month was approved dated from February 14, 1871. Sarah L. Sparks died June 21, 1875.

(Editor's Note: From the documents on the preceding pages, we know that Reuben H.Sparks was born ca. 1777. According to the 1850 census, he was born in Maryland and was a tailor by trade. At the time of the War of 1812, he was living in or near Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia. We know that he married Sarah L. McClellan (born ca. 1789) at Blountville, Tennessee, on September 14, 1807. (Blountville, Tennessee, is only about 20 miles from Abingdon, Virginia.) William Perry Johnson recently made a search of personal property tax lists of Washington County, Virginia, and found that the name of Reuben H. Sparks first appeared on the tax list of 1809, when he was taxed as one white poll over 16 years of age. The earliest census record for Washington County, Virginia, is that for 1810--here Reuben H. Sparks was listed with two males, probably sons, under 10 years of age. He was also listed on the Washington County census of 1820 and 1830. About 1836 he moved from Washington County, Virginia, to Washington County, Tennessee, a distance of about 40 miles. There Reuben died in 1855 and his wife died in 1875.

From census records it appears that Reuben H. and Sarah L. Sparks had five sons and five daughters. Of the sons, the names of only three have been determined. Three daughters were still living at home when the 1850 census was taken.

71.1 William A. Sparks, born ca. 1805;
71.x2 Ann E. Sparks, born ca. 1810;
71.4 James L. Sparks, born October 9, 1813;
71.x7 Sophia Sparks, born ca. 1824;
71.x8 Sarah P. Sparks, born ca. 1826.
71.x10 M. H. Sparks, born ca. 1833. He was still living at home in 1850 and was a printer.

71.4 James L. Sparks married Margaret Greer in Washington County, Tennessee, on October 18, 1836. According to the 1850 census, he was a printer. Listed on the 1850 census were five children:

71.4.1 Samuel G. Sparks, born ca. 1837.
71.4.2 Sarah H. Sparks, born ca. 1842.


71.4.3 Catherine R. Sparks, born ca. 1846.


71.4.4 James L. Sparks, born ca. 1847.


71.4.5 M.A. Sparks, born ca. 1848.

(These abstracts of bounty land and pension papers will be continued in future issues of the Quarterly.)


Page 3516
Whole Number 148

CLAIMS OF SOLDIERS, WAR OF 1812, FROM NEW YORK

The following items are found on pages 452-53 of Index of Awards on Claims of the Soldiers of the War of 1812, New York: Adjutant General's Office, 1969. They were apparently claims for equipment or clothing furnished by the indi vidual who served in the New York Militia.

Claim No. 5009. GEORGE SPARKS, Phelps, Ontario County. $33.00
Clalm No. 10564. JOSEPH D. Sparks, Poughkeepsie. $58.00
Claim No. 8786. WALTER C. SPARKS, New York. $50.00

[Note: See the application of Joseph D. Sparks, above, for bounty land for service in the War of 1812 in the Quarterly of December 1961 (Vol. IX, Whole No. 36, pp. 592-94).]


Pages 4512-4513
Whole Number 171

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812 BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATION


In the September 1960 issue of The Sparks Quarterly, we began a series of abstracts of applications for bounty land and pensions by soldiers named Sparks who had served in the War of 1812. We are pleased to add another abstract to that series.

DAVID SPARKS was born ca. 1783, probably at Bowdoinham, Maine, and was lost at sea in 1821. He married Mercy Thayer on April 21, 1804, in Hampshire County, Massachusetts. He served in Jenkins' Company of Langley's Regiment of the Massachusetts Militia. Bounty Land File: 288,148.

On March 9, 1858, Mercy Sluck, aged 73 years, a resident of Southampton, Massachusetts, and widow of William Sluck, her second husband, made a declaration for the purpose of obtaining bounty land under an "Act approved March 3, 1855." She stated that she was the widow of David Sparks, deceased, who had been a soldier in a company commanded by Capt. Southworth Jenkins in the regiment of Massachusetts Militia commanded by Colonel Thomas Langley in the war with Great Britain declared by the United States on June 18, 1812.

Her husband had been drafted at Westhampton, Massachusetts, on September 10, 1814, for a term of three months, and he continued in actual service for a term of about two months when he was honorably discharged at or near Boston about November 1, 1814. She had been married to David Sparks at North- ampton, Massachusetts, on the --- day of April 1804, by Solomon Williams, a clergyman. Her name before her marriage was Mercy Thayer. Her husband had died at sea on the --- day of -- A.D. 1821, and she was now a widow. She attested to the declaration by making her mark. James Quigley and Thomas E. Elliott, residents of Southampton, were witnesses, and the declaration was sworn to before Elisha Edwards, a justice of the peace.

A footnote to the declaration instructed the Commissioner of Pensions to forward her warrant to her agent, A. W. Thayer, at Northampton, Massachusetts. It, too, bore the signature (by mark) of Mercy Sluck.

Apparently the application of Mercy Sluck was rejected, perhaps because of the short term of military service of her first husband, David Sparks.

[Editor's Note: .See pages 4500-02 of the present issue of the Quarterly for further information about David Sparks.]

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