September 27, 2017

Pages 1046-1047
Whole Number 57

INDEX TO SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812



(Webmaster note: In the published articles, this Index comes last. It was moved to the beginning for quick access to links.)

Beginning in the issue of The Sparks Quarterly for September , 1960, and ending in the present issue, we have published a series of abstracts of bounty land and pension application papers of persons named Sparks who served in the War of 1812. Notes by the editor following most of the abstracts have provided additional data on the applicant and his family. In all, we have published material on seventy-six men named Sparks who gave service in America' s second war with England.

Now that the series has been completed, we have thought our readers would find a list of these records useful. Opposite each name is given a brief summary of the data which we have on that individual. Then, in parentheses, is given the issue of the Quarterly in which that abstract appears, with the page numbers it occupies.

AARON SPARKS of Camden, New Jersey; died September 4, 1856; married Elizabeth Applen of Salem County, New Jersey, September 15, 1813. (September , 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, p. 496.)

18.2.1 AARON SPARKS of Baltimore County, Maryland; born ca. 1787, died May 31, 1856; married Elizabeth Sparks on April 10, 1831. He was a son of Josiah Sparks, Jr. (September , 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, pp. 497-98.)

AARON SPARKS of Killingly, Connecticut; born ca. 1790, believed to have died during the War of 1812; he married Frances or Fanny Knight of Killingly on November 6, 1812. (September , 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, p. 498.)

BARZILLA SPARKS of Baltimore, Maryland; born ca. 1780, died April 13, 1848; he married Sarah Ann Gudgeon of Kent County, Maryland, on March 16, 1823. Sarah Ann was a resident of Gallia County, Ohio, in 1852, when she made application for a pension; by 1855 she was a resident of Campbell County, Kentucky. (September , 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, pp. 498-500.)

9.1.1.5 DANIEL P. SPARKS of Louisiana; he was born in 1784, died October 13, 1867; he married Maliza Vinson on June 29, 1841, at Franklin, Louisiana. She was a resident of Houston, Texas, when she made application for a pension in 1878. He was a son of Daniel and Martha (Pearce) Sparks. (September 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, pp. 500-501.)

DAVID SPARKS of Morgan County, Georgia, and Talladega County, Alabama; he was born in 1794; his wife's name was Milly. (September 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, p. 501.)

1.2.1.2.2.6.1 ELSBERRY SPARKS of Shawney Town, Illinois, Sabastian County, Arkansas, and Johnson County, Texas; he was born ca. 1793-94; he is believed to have been a son of Absolom and - - - - - (Elsberry) Sparks. (September 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, pp. 501-02.)

1.2.1.2.2.1.4 ENOCH SPARKS of Franklin County, Alabama; he was born in September , 1791; son of 1.2.1.2.2.1 John and Mary (Parmely) Sparks; his wife's name was Nancy. (September 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, pp. 502-03. Additional information on Enoch Sparks appears in the Quarterly of March 1966, Vol. XIV, No. 1, Whole No. 53, p. 967.)

FRANCIS SPARKS of Baltimore County, Maryland; he was born May 11, 1792, died November 26, 1867; married Betsey E. Schroder on March 21, 1831. (September 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, pp. 503-04.)

GEORGE SPARKS of Adams County, Ohio; he was born May 16, 1794, died December 30, 1839; he married Mary Decamp, license dated August 11, 1823. He was born in Pennsylvania and was a son of Salathiel Sparks who came to Adams County, Ohio, with his family from Washington County, Pennsylvania, in 1804. (September , 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, p. 504.)

1.2.5.1.2.9 GEORGE SPARKS of Wilkes County, North Carolina, and Elliott County, Kentucky; he was born November 9, 1796, died May 11, 1879; he was a son of John and Sarah (Shores) Sparks; he married, first, - - - - -Mainer; he married, second, Nancy Short. (Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, pp. 525-526.)

GEORGE SPARKS of Hardy County, Virginia, and Licking County, Ohio; he was born ca. 1777, died 5 February 1868; he married Nancy - - - - - ; he probably married a second wife named Jane - - - - - . (Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, p. 526.)

GEORGE SPARKS of Ulster and Seneca Counties, New York; he was born ca. 1792, died in 1864; he married Margaret Ostrander. (Dec, 1960; Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, p. 527.)

HENRY SPARKS of Salem County, New Jersey, (Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, p. 527-528.)

Henry W. Sparks of Killingly, Connecticut, (Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, p. 528.)

JACOB F. SPARKS of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; he was born ca. 1779; died probably before 1855. (Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, p. 529.)

JAMES SPARKS of Bedford County, Pennsylvania; born ca. 1788; he married Phoebe - - - - -. (Dec, 1960, Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, pp. 529-30.)

JAMES SPARKS of Jonesville, Lee County, Virginia; he died in 1816. (March, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 1, Whole No. 33, pp. 542-43.)

JAMES SPARKS of Bowdoinham, Maine; he was born ca. 1795. (March, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 1, Whole No. 33, p. 543.)

JAMES SPARKS of Richmond County, North Carolina, and Lexington County, South Carolina; he was born between 1780 and 1795; he married Nancy Huggins in Anson County, North Carolina, in 1818; he was still living in 1871. (March, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 1, Whole No. 33, pp. 543-44.)

JAMES SPARKS of Jefferson County, Kentucky, and Marion County, Missouri; he was born ca. 1791; died July 23, 1851; he is believed to have married Nancy (or Anna) Kennett. (March, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 1, Whole No. 33, pp. 544-45.)

JOEL SPARKS of Surry County, North Carolina, and Bates County, Missouri; he was born prior to 1793; he died about 1861; the name of his first wife is unknown, but he married, second, Mary Shatley; he was a son of Matthew and Eunice Sparks. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 579-580.)

JOHN SPARKS of Salem County, New Jersey; he was born ca. 1793, still living in 1855. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 580-81.)

JOHN SPARKS born probably in North Carolina; he grew up in Georgia, and died at Tallassee, Alabama; he was born June 26, 1784, and died October 18, 1836; he married Sarah Brooks; he was a son of Matthew Sparks, Jr. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 581-82.)

JOHN SPARKS of New Jersey; he was born ca. 1773 and died before 1831. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 582-83.)

JOHN SPARKS of Union and Spartanburg Counties, South Carolina; he was born ca. 1795, and died in 1857. He was a son of Josiah and Lydia (Tollison) Sparks. He married Fereby - - - - (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, p. 583.)

JOHN SPARKS of Brown County, Ohio, and Johnson County, Indiana; born ca. 1789. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, p. 584.)

JOSEPH SPARKS of Bedford County, Pennsylvania; he was born ca. 1785, and was still living in 1855; he is believed to have been a son of Joseph Sparks, Jr. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 584-85.)

JOSEPH SPARKS of Bristol, Rhode Island; born ca. 1790, he was still living in 1855. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 587-88.)

JOSEPH D. SPARKS of Ulster and Dutchess Counties, New York; he was born ca. 1795, and died March 29, 1867; he married Esther C. Titus. (Dec, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 4, Whole No. 36, pp. 592-94.)

27.1.3 JOSEPH K. SPARKS of Newberry County, South Carolina, and Wilmington, Ohio; he was born ca. 1791, and died September 17, 1873; he was a son of Stephen Sparks and a brother of Zachariah Sparks who also received bounty land; he married, first, Elizabeth Goodwin; he married, second, Abi (Linton) Farquhar. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 588-89.)

JOSEPH S. SPARKS of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and Bureau County, Illinois; he was born May 11, 1794, and died March 31, 1868; he was a son of Solomon and Rachel Sparks; he married Elizabeth Naill. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 585-86. Additional information of Joseph S. Sparks was published in the Quarterly of Jane 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Whole No. 50, p. 912.)

JOSIAH SPARKS, born ca. 1796 in New Jersey, died in Wilmington, Delaware, on December 29, 1866; he married, probably as a second wife, Sarah Doel; he was closely related to the Aaron Sparks of Camden, New Jersey, whose name appears as the first one in this list. (Dec, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 4, Whole No. 36, pp. 594-95.)

LABAN SPARKS of Baltimore County, Maryland; he was born ca. 1794; he was a son of Thomas and Rachel (Perdue) Sparks; he married Sarah Green. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 4, Whole No. 36, p. 595.)

LEONARD SPARKS, born probably between 1780 and 1790 in South Carolina; a resident of Jefferson County, Tennessee, about 1806-1812; married Patsey Beard. (September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 4, Whole No. 36, pp. 596-98.)

MADISON SPARKS, of Culpeper County, Virginia, and Owen County, Kentucky; he was born August 10, 1795, and died August 13, 1873; he was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks; he married his first cousin, Fanny Sparks; his brother, Reuben Sparks, also received bounty land. (March, 1962, Vol. X, No. 1, Whole No. 37, pp. 634-35.)

MARTIN SPARKS, born ca. 1783 in New York; a resident of Clark County, Illinois, in 1855. (March, 1962, Vol. X, No. 1, Whole No. 37, p. 635.)

MATTHEW SPARKS of Mecklenburgh County, Virginia, and Greene County, Indiana; he was born ca. 1782 and died about 1850; he married Mary - - - - - (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 640-42.)

MATTHEW SPARKS of Baltimore County, Maryland; he was born ca. 1790 and died May 12, 1874; he was a son of Josiah Sparks, Jr.; he married Mary Johnson. (March, 1962, Vol. X, No. 1, Whole No. 37, p. 636; also June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, p. 642.)

MATTHEW SPARKS of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and Rockingham County, North Carolina; he was born ca. 1781; he is believed to have married Mary Vaughan. (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 642-43.)

MATTHEW B. SPARKS of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and Morgan County, Illinois; he was born ca. 1780 and died in 1845; he was a son of Matthew and Kezia (Stone) Sparks; he married Nancy Sutton. (March, 1962, Vol. X, No. 1, Whole No. 37, pp. 636-37.)

MOSES SPARKS of Jefferson County, Kentucky, Jackson County, Indiana, and Collin County, Texas; he was born ca. 1789 and died in 1858; he was a son of James Sparks; he married Elizabeth (wife of Moses) LNU . (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 643-44.)

NATHAN F. SPARKS, born ca. 1810 in Tennessee; resident of Tallapoosa County, Alabama, before 1836 and until death removal to Anderson County, Texas, between 1850 and 1855; a resident of Johnson County, Texas, in later years.

NIMROD SPARKS, born ca. 1790 in Washington County, Pennsylvania; died January 20, 1840, in Jefferson County, Kentucky; he married Susan B. Parker. (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 645-46.)

ORSON SPARKS, born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, about 1791; he resided in Bullitt County, Kentucky, moved to Clark County, later Scott County, Indiana, followirg the War of 1812; returned to Buliitt County, later Spencer County, Kentucky; about 1830 moved to Marion County, Missouri, and died there in 1870; he was a son of Daniel and Sarah Sparks; he married Margaret Burditt. (June, 1962, Vol. X, No, 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 646-49.)

RANDALL SPARKS of Gloucester County, New Jersey; he was born ca. 1778 and died July 12, 1830; he was a son of the Hon. John Sparks and his third wife, Ruth Randall; he was married twice, first to Ann Clark and second to Rebecca Stetser. (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 649-650.)

REUBEN SPARKS of Boone County, Kentucky; he was born in 1792 and died in 1848 or 1849; he was a son of Henry and Lucy (Clark) Sparks of Owen County, Kentucky; he married Rosa or Rosanna World or Worrell; his brother, Madison Sparks, also received bounty land. (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 650-51.)

REUBEN SPARKS of Jefferson County, New York, and Bedford, Ontario, Canada; he was born ca. 1780-85 and died November 17, 1836; he married Lusetta Rice. (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, pp. 660-61.)

REUBEN H. SPARKS of Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia, and Washington County, Tennessee; he was born ca. 1777 and died on July 15, 1855; he married Sarah L. McClellan. (June, 1962, Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38, pp. 651-53.)

23. RICHARD SPARKS, born ca. 1770-80 in North Carolina or Virginia; died in Jefferson County, Tennessee, in 1836; he married Anna Smith, who died in Wright County, Missouri. (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, pp. 661-65.)

22.x RICHARD SPARKS of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; he was born ca. 1790 and died September 18, 1820; he was a son of 22. David Sparks of Philadelphia; he married Eliza Ford Freeston. (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, pp. 665- 66.)

ROBERT SPARKS born ca. 1779 in Maryland; he died in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, on May 29, 1826; he married Catharine Fink in Jefferson County, Ohio, in March, 1815. (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, pp. 666-67.)

ROBERT SPARKS born ca. 1789 in North Carolina; he was drafted in 1814 in Jasper County, Georgia; he was a resident of Putnam County, Georgia, in 1850; he married Sarah (wife of Robert) LNU . (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, pp. 667- 68.)

ROBERT SPARKS born in Steuben, Maine, about 1804; he was a son of Thomas Sparks; he served as a drummer boy in the War of 1812; following his discharge he resided for 50 years in St. George, New Brunswick; he moved to Beverly, Massachusetts, then in 1872 to Nealville, Wisconsin; from 1873 to 1878 in lived in Anoka, Minnesota; he died November 30, 1880; he married Elizabeth Shaw. (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, p. 668; additional information in issue of Dec, 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Whole No. 52, p. 941.)

ROBERT U. SPARKS of Camden, New Jersey; he was born ca. 1792 and died February 1, 1872; he married Amy (wife of Robert U.) LNU. (September , 1962, Vol. X, No. 3, Whole No. 39, pp. 668-69.)

SIMON SPARKS of Woodbury, Gloucester County, New Jersey; be was born in 1781, and was still living in 1855. (June, 1963, Vol. XI, No. 2, Whole No. 42, p. 738.

SIMON SPARKS, born in New Jersey ca. 1790; he died in Montgomery County, Illinois, October 2, 1854; he was probably a son of 37.1 Sinnickson Sparks; he served in the place of his brother, Andrew Sparks. Simon Sparks married Catherine Templeton. (June, 1963, Whole No. 42, pp. 738-741.)

SOLOMON SPARKS born January 4, 1787, in Washington County, Pennsylvania; he died May 21, 1860, in Taylor County, Virginia (now West Virginia); he was a son of George and Rachel (Norris) Sparks; he married Rachel Nixon. (September , 1963, Whole No. 43, pp. 757-58.)

SOLOMON SPARKS born ca. 1783 in Wilkes County, North Carolina; a resident of Cherokee County, North Carolina, prior to 1850; he was probably a son of John Sparks; he married Julia (wife of Solomon) LNU. (Dec, 1963, Vol. XI, No. 4, Whole No. 44, pp. 780-81.)

STEPHEN SPARKS born in 1775 in what is now Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; he died August 9, 1851, in Jackson County, Indiana; he was a son of James Sparks and a brother of Moses Sparks, mentioned earlier; he married Catherine Padget. (Dec, 1963, Vol. XI, No. 4, Whole No. 44, pp. 781-83.)

18.4.3 THOMAS SPARKS born ca. 1790 in Baltimore County, Maryland; he was drafted in Montgomery County, Maryland, in 1814; by 1851 he had moved to Montgomery County, Indiana; he was a son of 18.4 Thomas and Rachel (Perdue) Sparks and a brother of 18.4.1 Laban Sparks, mentioned earlier; he married Jinsey - - - - - (June, 1964, Vol. XII, No. 2, Whole No. 46, p. 818.)

THOMAS SPARKS of Pittsylvania County, Virginia; he was born ca. 1795 and was still living in 1871; he married Nancy Wright in Caswell County, North Carolina, in 1817. (June, 1964, Vol. VII, No. 2, Whole No. 46, pp. 818-19.)

THOMAS SPARKS of Rhode Island and Spencer, Tioga County, New York; he died in 1813 at Sacketts Harbor while a soldier in the U.S. Army; he married Margaret Cowell. (June, 1964, Vol. VII, No. 2, Whole No. 46, pp. 820-21.)

THOMAS SPARKS of Salem County, New Jersey; he was born ca. 1793 and died in 1822; he married Phebe Mayhew; he was probably a son of Thomas and Sarah Sparks. (June, 1964, Vol. VII, No. 2, Whole No. 46, pp. 821-22.)

URIAH SPARKS born in North Carolina about 1797; he was a resident of Morgan County, Georgia, in 1815; lived later in Newton and Carroll Counties, Georgia; the name of his first wife is unknown, but he married, second, Mrs. Sarah Whatley in 1832. (September , 1964, Vol. XII, No. 3, Whole No. 47, pp. 842-43.)

WALTER SPARKS of Henry County, Kentucky; he died in Orange County, Indiana, on August 15, 1843; he married Susan Prewitt or Fruit on February 8, 1814, in Henry County, Kentucky. (September , 1964, Vol. XII, No, 3, Whole No. 47, pp. 844-46.)

WALTER C. SPARKS of New York City; he was born ca. 1791 and was still living in 1871. (September , 1964, Vol. XII, No. 3, Whole No. 47, pp. 843-44.)

WESLEY SPARKS of Parke and Harrison Counties, Indiana; he was born ca. 1790 and was still living in 1855. (September , 1964, Vol. XII, No. 3, Whole No. 47, pp. 846-47.)

11.2.2 WILLIAM SPARKS of Bourbon County, Kentucky; he was born at least as early as 1792 (Closer to 1787 - see the Quarterly Whole Number 162) and died in 1849; he married Elizabeth Barton in 1826 (this was a second marriage); she was living in Marion County, Missouri, in 1855; she later moved to Saline County, Missouri. (June, 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Whole No. 50, pp. 908-09.)

1.2.1.2.2.1.1 WILLIAM SPARKS born May 1, 1782, in Wilkes County, North Carolina; he died December 25, 1857, in Franklin County, Alabama; he was a son of John and Mary (Parmely) Sparks; he married Eunice Woodruff. (June, 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 2, Whole No. 50, pp. 910-11; additional information on William Sparks was published in the Quarterly of March 1966, Vol. XIV, No. 1, Whole No. 53, pp. 960-68.)

WILLIAM SPARKS born ca. 1794 in Kentucky; volunteered in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1814; he married Cordelia Donavan in Fleming County, Kentucky, in1815; he died in Andrew County, Missouri, between 1856 and 1860. (September , 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 3, Whole No. 51, pp. 928-30.)

WILLIAM SPARKS born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, about 1793; he died in Monongalia County, Virginia (now West Virginia) on March 13, 1853; he married Sarah Clouse in 1821. (September , 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 3, Whole No, 51, pp. 930-32.)

WILLIAM SPARKS born ca. 1791 in Maryland; a resident of Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1819 where he married on October 14, 1819, Jane Wiggins; he moved to Ripley Brown County, Ohio, in 1820 where he died November 22, 1876. (Dec, 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Whole No. 52, pp. 950-51.)

1.2.1.2.1.2.7 WILLIAM D. SPARKS born in Surry County, North Carolina, about 1790; died in Cooper County, Missouri, priorto 1860; he was a son of 1.2.1.2.1.2. Matthew and Eunice Sparks; his wife's name on the 1850 census was given as Priscitta; he was a brother of 1.2.1.2.1.2.4 Joel Sparks who also received bounty land. (Dec, 1965, Vol. XIII, No. 4, Whole No. 52, pp. 951-53.)

93.1.3.1 WILLIAM J. SPARKS born March, 1795, in Franklin County, Georgia; he moved to Fayette County, Alabama, prior to 1837, probably before 1830; he was a son of 93.1.3 Elijah and Judith (Humphreys) Sparks; he married Naomi Prickett in 1822 (she may have been his second wife); his wife's name on the 1850 and 1860 census was given as Sarah. (March, 1967, Vol. XV, No. 1, Whole No. 57, pp. 104143.)

WRIGHT BRUCE SPARKS born May 6, 1785, in Harford County, Maryland; he moved to Franklin County, Indiana, in 1816, where he was still living in 1871; he was a son of Francis and FNU (Wright) Sparks; he married Mangya von Magnus, whose name was anglicized to Nancy Ann Magnus. (March, 1967, Vol. XV, No. 1, Whole No. 57, pp. 1043-44.)

27.1.1? ZACHARIAH SPARKS born in Newberry County, South Carolina, about 1780; he moved to Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, where he was living as late as 1860, making his home with his brother, Dr. Joseph K. Sparks; he was a son of Stephen Sparks of Newberry County, South Carolina; Zachariah Sparks is believed never to have married. (March, 1967, Vol. XV, No. 1, Whole No. 57, p. 1045.)


Page 660-669
Whole Number 39

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS


REUBEN SPARKS, of Jefferson County, New York; died November 17, 1836, in Bedford, Ontario, Canada. Widow, LUSETTA (RICE) SPARKS, born ca. 1785. Pension File, WO 11 488.

On June 7, 1875, Lusetta Sparks, widow of Reuben Sparks, made application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. She stated that she was a resident of Ivermay in the county of Bruce, Province of Ontario, Canada, and that she was 87 years old. She stated that Reuben Sparks had enlisted in the United States service and served at Sackets Harbour, New York, during the War against Great Britain of 1812-15, 'and was honorably discharged at the close of each one of two periods of enlistment in the said service; that she cannot now remember under what captain or in what company, regiment, brigade or division the said service was performed.' She stated that her name before her marriage was Lusetta Rice and that she was married Reuben Sparks on January 24, 1814, by the Rev. Mr. Warner at Watertown, Jefferson County, New York, and that Reuben Sparks died at Bedford, Ontario, on November 17, 1836. Lusetta Sparks signed her application by mark; Reuben Sparks (who was probably a son) and Abraham Neelands signed as witnesses; both ware residents of the township of Arran, Province of Ontario.

On July 3, 1875, the Pension Office informed Mrs. Sparks that before any action could be taken on her application, she would have to furnish the names of the officers under whom her husband had served. She replied on October 15, 1875:

'I cannot remember the name of the company my husband served in. I think the Captain's name was Bremner, I cannot [be] sure. He served as a volunteer; there never was any Land Warrant received.' A search was made by the Treasury Department, and, although they found that a company had been commanded by a Capt. Andrew Bremner, they could not find a record of the soldier's name in his company. The application was rejected on December 28, 1875, on the basis of lack of evidence that Reuben Sparks had ever served.

On September 26, 1883, Lusetta Sparks, now a resident of Westport, Mendocino County, California, appointed W. T. Fitzgerald of Washington, D.C., as her attorney to reopen her application. She signed this document by mark, as she had the earlier applications. Again, Reuben Sparks (probably her son) signed as a witness, indicating that he, too, had moved to California. Because still no evidence of her husband's service could be found, her application was again rejected.

23. RICHARD SPARKS, born ca. 1770-80, probably in North Carolina or Virginia, died in Jefferson County, Tennessee, in 1836. He married Anna Smith, born ca. 1785, in Franklin County, North Carolina, June 1, 1805; she died in Wright County, Missouri. Bounty Land Warrant 43 018-80-55.

On February 22, 1854, Anna Sparks, a resident of Wright County, Missouri, appeared before William Butler, a justice of the peace, to make application for bounty land. She stated that she was 65 years old and was the widow of Richard Sparks who had been a private in a company commanded by Capt. Thomas Crawford in the 7th Regiment of North Carolina Militia commanded by Jas. Pearson 'in the War with the Creek Indians.' She stated that he had volunteered at Sallsbury [i.e. Salisbury] North Carolina, on or about September 4, 1814 [she intended this to be February 1, 1814] for six months and was honorably discharged at Salisbury, North Carolina, on September 4, 1814. She stated that she and Richard Sparks had been married in Franklin County, North Carolina, on June 1, 1805, by James Sowell, a justice of the peace, and that her maiden name had been Anna Smith. She stated that her husband, Richard Sparks, had died in Jefferson County, Tennessee, on October 19, 1836, and that she had not remarried. Her signature on this application appears as 'Anna Sparks,' although later she stated that H. H. Lea had signed her name for her. The witnesses to her application were P. W. Bradshaw, her son-in-law, and George W. Sparks, her son; they stated that 'they were acquainted with the said Anna Sparks & Richard Sparks for about five years before the death of the said Richard Sparks and that they lived together and was recognized as man & wife.' Both signed their names to this document.

With her application, Anna Sparks sent the discharge that her husband had received. It reads as follows: 'Salisbury, 4 day of September 1814. I certify that Richard Sparks a Private in Captain Thomas Crawfords company of Infantry in the 7th Regiment of detached Militia from North Carolina, in the service of the United States, has performed his tour of service; and is hereby regularly and honourably discharged. [signed] Jas Pearson Colonel 7th Regiment N.C. Militia, U. States' service.'

War Department records proved that Richard Sparks had served from February 1, 1814, to September 4, 1814. His widow, Anna Sparks, was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land on May 23, 1854.

On August 11, 1855, Anna Sparks again appeared before William Butler and made application under the new act of March 3, 1855, for additional bounty land. She stated that she was 'about seventy years' old and a resident of Wright County, Missouri. Instead of saying that her husband had served in the War against the Creek Indians, as she had in her first application, she stated in 1855 that he had served in the War of 1812. She stated she had been 'married to the said Richard Sparks in Franklin County in the State of North Carolina about the year AD 1805, (the precise date not recollected) by one James Sowell an acting Justice of the peace.' She stated that Richard Sparks had 'died in Jefferson County in the State of Tennessee in the fall of the year AD 1836, the precise date of his death not being now recollected.' She added that she knew of no person living who had witnessed her marriage. She signed this application by mark. George W. Sparks and P. W. Bradshaw again witnessed Anna's application. They stated that they had known Richard and Anna Sparks to be husband and wife and declared that 'the said Richard Sparks died in the County of Jefferson in the State of Tennessee in the year 1836, we having been present at his death and burial.' Both signed their names.

Since Anna Sparks signed her application in 1855 by mark, whereas it appeared that she had written her name in her first application, the Pension Office questioned whether she was the same person. On July 14, 1856, she again appeared before William Butler and declared that 'she is unable to write her own name, and that she always makes her mark and that she knows of no other way of accounting for any dissimilarity in the signatures. In her application for bounty land in 1854 she states that H. H. Lea wrote her name and she made her mark, and in her application for bounty land now on file in the Pension Office, she states, that Julian Frazor wrote her name and that she made her mark.' She signed this statement by mark and George W. Sparks and P. W. Bradshaw again were the witnesses--but in this instance Bradshaw wrote his first name rather that the initial 'P'--it appears to be 'Pearce.

Anna Sparks was granted a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: From the above records, we know that Richard Sparks and Anna Smith were married in Franklin County, North Carolina, on June 1, 1805; that Richard Sparks volunteered for service in the War of 1812 on February 1, 1814, at Salisbury, North Carolina, and that he died in Jefferson County, Tennessee, on October 19, 1836.

The records of Franklin County, North Carolina, have been searched by William Perry Johnson, but the name of Richard Sparks does not appear among them. Perhaps Anna Smith lived in Franklin County while Richard Sparks lived in another county and he simply came to Franklin County for the marriage. There was a Stephen Sparks who purchased land in Franklin County in 1810 and died there in April, 1846. He had previously lived in Warren County, North Carolina. This Stephen Sparks's wife was named Elizabeth. They apparently had no children and had become estranged by the time of Stephen's death. Perhaps this Stephen Sparks and Richard Sparks were related.

Military records of North Carolina reveal that Richard Sparks was a resident of Iredell County, North Carolina, when he volunteered during the War of 1812. Census records reveal that Richard and Anna (Smith) Sparks were living in Iredell County, North Carolina, in 1810, 1820, and 1830. Richard was listed as aged over 45 in 1810, which, if correct, would mean that he was born before 1765 and was at least 40 years old when he and Anna ware married in 1805. However, on the 1830 census his age was given as between 50 and 60, which would mean he was born between 1770 and 1780. This latter census is probably more accurate than the earlier one. Anna was born ca. 1785.

The date on which Richard Sparks and his family moved to Tennessee has not been determined, except that it must have been between 1830 and 1836. In her application, Anna stated that Richard Sparks died in Jefferson County, Tennessee, on October 19, 1836. The clerk of probate of Jefferson County reports that there is no record of his estate being settled there, but early records of this kind are often lacking. About 1840, Anna (Smith) Sparks moved from Tennessee to Wright County, Missouri, with several of her children.

W. F. Arnall of Hartville, Missouri, and James L. Sparks, Box 4601 State Capitol, Lincoln 9, Nebraska, both of whom descend from Richard and Anna (Smith) Sparks, have furnished the Association with a considerable amount of information on the descendants of Richard's son, James Sparks. Little is known of his other children. Following is a list of those children of Richard and Anna (Smith) Sparks whom we have been able to identify; the order of their birth is uncertain:

23.1 George Washington Sparks, born ca. 1806.
23.2 William Sparks, probably born ca. 1809.
23.3 Siney or Seneth Sparks, born ca. 1810.
23.4 James Sparks, born July 4, 1813.
23.5 Alfred B. Sparks, born ca. 1820.
23.6 Polly Sparks.
23.7 Elizabeth or Betsy Sparks.
23.8 Thomas Sparks

23.1 George Washington Sparks, son of Richard and Anna (Smith) Sparks, was born ca. 1806 in Iredell County, North Carolina. He married Rachel who was also born in North Carolina about 1806. They moved to Tennessee with Richard Sparks between 1830 and 1836 and about 1840 they moved to Wright County, Missouri. George Washington and Rachel Sparks are known to have had the following children, perhaps others:

23.1.1 Tabitha Sparks, born ca. 1834.
23.1.2 Anna Sparks, born ca. 1836.
23.1.3 William Sparks, born ca. 1839.
23.1.4 Alvira Sparks, born ca. 1841.
23.1.5 Jane Sparks, born ca. 1842.
23.1.6 Susannah Sparks, born ca. 1846.
23.1.7 James Sparks, born ca. 1849.

23.2 William Sparks. Nothing is known among the Wright County, Missouri, Sparkses about this William Sparks. However, a William G. Sparks, born ca. 1809, is known to have been living in Hamilton and Jefferson Counties, Tenn., between 1830 aud 1846. Since it is also known that he was born in North Carolina, we are inclined to believe that he was the same William Sparks who was the son of Richard and Anna. by 1850, this William Sparks was living in Walker County, Georgia, having moved there from Tennessee about 1846.

He was a farmer, but was also a minister in the Methodist Church. He died in Georgia in 1857. He married Nazey Daffron, a native of Tennessee, who died in 1887. According to a biographical sketch of their son, Dr. Jacob S. Sparks that appeared in the History of Southeast Missouri (Chicago: Goodspeed Pub. Co., 1888), p. 948, William G. and Nazey (Daffron) Sparks were the parents of ten children. The names of eight of these can be determined from the 1850 census of Walker County, Georgia.

23.2.1 Owen D. Sparks, born ca. 1832 in Tennessee.
23.2.2 Jacob S. Sparks, born October 10, 1834, in Jefferson County, Tenn.
23.2.3 Susan J. Sparks, born ca. 1837 in Tennessee.
23.2.4 William G. Sparks, born ca. 1839 in Tennessee.
23.2.5 Martha Sparks, born ca. 1841, in Tennessee.
23.2.6 Cyntha Sparks, born ca. 1843 in Tennessee.
23.2.7 Richard Sparks, born ca. 1844 in Tennessee.
23.2.8 Joseph Sparks, born ca. 1847 in Georgia.

23.3 Siney or Seneth Sparks was born in North Carolina ca. 1810. She came to Wright County, Missouri, with the rest of the family about 1840 and died there. She was married P. W. Bradshaw in Tennessee. They are known to have had the following children, perhaps others:

23.3.1 Benjamin Bradshaw, born ca. 1832 in Tennessee.
23.3.2 Elizabeth Bradshaw, born ca. 1835 in Tennessee; married ----- Jerrett.
23.3.3 Joseph Bradshaw, born ca. 1837 in Tennessee.
23.3.4 Richard Bradshaw, born ca. 1839 in Tennessee.
23.3.5 William Bradshaw, born ca. 1842 in Missouri.
23.3.6 Martha Bradshaw, born ca. 1846 in Missouri; married ----- Owens.
23.3.7 Anna Bradshaw, born ca. 1848 in Missouri; married ----- Sanders.
23.3.8 Sarah Bradshaw, born ca. 1850 in Missouri; married ----- Owens.

23.4 James Sparks, born July 4, 1813, in Iredell County, North Carolina, died March 10, 1903, at Hartville, Wright County, Missouri. (There is some question regarding the year of his birth, but most records support the belief that it was 1813. In 1892, James Sparks applied for a pension based on his service in the war with the Cherokee Indians (in which the Indians were forced to go to reservations west of the Mississippi River) in 1837. He stated that he was then (1892) 79 years of age and that he had served as a corporal in the company commanded by Capt. G. W. Laffery in the regiment commanded by Col. byrd comprised of Tennessee Mounted Volunteers. He stated that he had been 24 years old in 1837; that he enlisted in February, 1837, for one year at Chatianooga, Tennessee, then called Ross''s Landing, and that he was discharged in July or August, 1837, at Chattanooga. He stated that when he enlisted he was 5 feet 8 inches tall, with blue eyes, black hair and a dark complexion, that he had been a farmer by occupation and had been born in Iredell County, North Carolina. He stated that after the war he lived in Hamilton County, Tennessee, for 2 years, then in Bledsoe County, Tennessee, for 4 years, and then in Wright County, Missouri, for 50 years. James Sparks was married four times. He married first, in Tennessee, Elizabeth Matthews in 1837; she died in September , 1844. He married, second, Delilah Seagraves, who died in 1888. He married, third, Sarah L. Hutsell; they were divorced between 1892 and 1894. He married, fourth, Mary Ann Bivian in 1894. by his first wife, James Sparks had two children:

23.4.2 Mary or Polly Sparks, born August 4, 1840, in Tennessee, died February 29, 1917. She married, first, in 1860, B. Calhouse; second, in 1870, Matthew J. Arnall.
23.4.2 James Richard Sparks, born July 24, 1841, in Laclede County, Missouri, died March 8, 1894. He married Sara L. Barnett; she died in Wright County, Missouri, in 1875 at the age of 30. James Richard Sparks married, second, Susie Abshire, who was born July 24, 1848, and died January 19, 1923.

by his second wife, Delilah Seagraves, James Sparks had the following children:

23.4.3 Martha Jane Sparks, born September 10, 1854; died May 28, 1926. She married James B. Freeman who was born May 28, 1861; died January 2, 1939.
23.4.4 William Grey Sparks, died December 1, 1891; married Fannie Jackson.
23.4.5 Caroline Sparks, married John Glenn.
23.4.6 Thomas Jefferson Sparks, born May 26, 1861; died February 1, 1939. He married Nancy Caudle; second,
Amanda Grogen.
23.4.7 Sarah Sparks, born May 26, 1862; married Alf Moore.
23.4.8 Jacob Baylor Sparks, born December 24, 1866; died 1 April 1947. He married Rosa Bohannon.
23.4.9 Missouri Sparks, born ca. 1867; married (first) Andrew Caudle; (2d) Neil Duggan; (third) Robert Holt; (4th) FNU Seymore.
23.4.10 Alford Burton Sparks, born June 26, 1869; died March 22, 1936; married (first) Alabama E. Angel; (2d)
Sally Henretta LaPrade.

23.5 Alfred B. Sparks was born ca. 1820 in North Carolina. He moved to Tennessee with his parents and to Wright County, Missouri, about 1840. He later moved to Arkansas where he died. He married Nancy (wife of 23.5) LNU and they are known to have had four children:

23.5.1 William Sparks, born ca. 1845.
23.5.2 Sarah Sparks, born ca. 1846.
23.5.3 Malinda Sparks, born ca. 1849.
23.5.4 George Sparks, born After 1850.

23.6 Polly Sparks. Her real name was probably Mary. We have no information regarding her life.

23.7 Elizabeth or Betsy Sparks. She married in Tennessee before 1840 to John Martin. They moved to Arkansas.

23.8 Thomas Sparks. According to Mr. Arnall, he moved to Texas and was never heard from again.)

RICHARD SPARKS, born ca. 1790, died in Philadelphia September 18, 1820; married ELIZA FORD FREESTON, born ca. 1796. Bounty Land Warrant File 33 715-80-55.

On March 4, 1851, Eliza F. Sparks, a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, appeared before Joel Cook, a justice of the peace, to make application for bounty land under the act passed by Congress on September 28, 1850. She stated that she was 55 years old and was the widow of Richard Sparks who had served as a private in the First Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery commanded by Col. A. M. Prevost in the War of 1812; that he had volunteered at Philadelphia on or about August 20, 1814, for the term of six months and that he was honorably discharged at Philadelphia on January 2, 1815. She stated that she had been married to Richard Sparks in Philadelphia on May 4, 1815, by the Rev. Nicholas Collin and that her name before her marriage was Eliza Ford Freeston. She stated that Richard Sparks had died at Philadelphia on September 18, 1820. She signed her name as 'Eliza F. Sparks.'

Along with her application, Eliza F. Sparks submitted a sworn statement dated March 4, 1851, made by Thomas Sparks, aged 66 years, and Sophia Donaldson, aged 59 years, both residents of Philadelphia. They swore that they were both acquainted with Richard Sparks in his lifetime and with his widow, Eliza, who 'has not married again since his death.' Both signed their names to this document and Joel Cook signed as a justice of the peace. The relationship of Thomas Sparks to Richard Sparks was not stated.

Also accompanying this application is a copy made by Joel Cook of the orginal marriage certificate of Richard and Eliza Sparks. It reads as follows: 'These certify, that Richard Sparks, by trade plummer, resident in Philadelphia, son of decd. David Sparks and his relict Rachel in Philadelphia, past twenty four years of age, of the one party, and Eliza Ford Freeston, resident in Philada., Daughter of decd. Robert Freeston and his relict Mary in Philada., past eighteen years of age, of the other party, are joined in the Banns of Holy Wedlock on this day by me. Given under my hand and seal at Philadelphia on the fourth day of May in the year of Christ one thousand eight hundred and fifteen.

(signed) Nicholas Collin (Seal)
Rector of the Swedish Church in the
State of Pennª.

We the underwritten, have witnessed the solemnization of this Nuptial Contract and certify, that it is free from every legal impedements.
(signed) Jacob F. Sparks
William Freeston.'

On February 12, 1852, Eliza F. Sparks made a sworn statement to the effect that she knew nothing of a written discharge of Richard Sparks and stated that she did not believe he had ever received one.

Records in Washington proved that Richard Sparks had served as a private in Capt. James M. Linnard's company in Col. A. M. Prevost's regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers from August 24, 1814, to January 2, 1815. Eliza F. Sparks was issued Land Warrant No. 30,750 for 80 acres of bounty land.

On October 16, 1855, Eliza F. Sparks appeared before Charles D. Freeman, a justice of the peace, to make application for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. She stated that she was still a resident of Philadelphia and that she was 59 years old. She gave the same information as in her first application. She signed her name as 'Eliza F. Sparks.' Hannah C. Flickiver and Sophia Donaldson signed as witnesses. At the end of her application, Eliza directed the Commissioner of Pensions to deliver her warrant to her attorney, John H. Frick. The witnesses to her signature this time were Thos. Sparks, Jr., and Charles D. Freeman. She was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: From the marriage certificate of Richard Sparks and Eliza Ford (Freeston) Sparks, we know that Richard was a son of David Sparks of Philadelphia and that David Sparks had died prior to 1815. David Sparks was listed as a resident of Philadelphia on the 1790 census--his household consisted of 2 males over 16, 3 males under 16, and 4 females. Eliza F. Sparks, widow of Richard, was listed on the 1850 census of Dock Ward in Philadelphia; her age was given as 45 and she was living in the household of Thomas Sparks, aged 50. Also living with Thomas Sparks was Sophia Donaldson, aged 40, all born in Pennsylvania. Thomas Sparks and Sophia Donaldson, it will be recalled, swore in 1851 that they had known Richard Sparks. Thomas Sparks was probably a brother of Richard and perhaps Sophia Donaldson was a sister.)

ROBERT SPARKS, born ca. 1779 in Maryland; married Catharine Fink in Jefferson County, Ohio, in March, 1815; he died in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, May 29, 1826.

On January 7, 1851, Catharine Sparks, a resident of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, applied for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. She stated that she was 59 years old and the widow of Robert Sparks, who was a private in the company commanded by Capt. Absolem Martin of the 27th Regiment of U.S. Infantry and was transferred to Capt. A. Gray's company of the 19th Regiment of the U.S. in the War of 1812. She stated that he had enlisted at Springfield, Jefferson County, Ohio, on or about August 6, 1813, for one year, and was discharged at Detroit, Michigan, on August 6, 1814. She stated that she had been married to Robert Sparks at Springfield, Jefferson County, Ohio, in March, 1815, by John Moody, a justice of the peace, and that her name before her marriage was Catharine Fink. She stated that her husband, Robert Sparks, died in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, on May 29, 1826, and that she was still his widow. She signed her application by mark before George W. Ilwaine, a justice of the peace.

Attached to the application of Catharine Sparks is a sworn statement dated January 17, 1851, by Mary Arm Cahill and Margaret Fink who stated that they were both acquainted with Robert Sparks and his wife, Catharine, and that they were present at their marriage which was performed by John Moody at Springfield, Ohio, in March,1815. They stated that Robert Sparks had died in Tuscarawas County sometime in 1826. Both Mary Ann Cahill and Margaret Fink signed by mark.

Along with her application, Catharine Sparks sent her husband's written discharge. It indicates that his service was exactly as she had stated it to be in her application. It also states that Robert Sparks was born in the state of Maryland, and that he was thirty-five years old at the time of his discharge on August 6, 1814; also that he was five feet, eight inches tall with dark hair, grey eyes and a light complexion; that he was a farmer by occupation.

Also included with her application was a certified copy of the record of marriage which had been filed in the Jefferson County, Ohio, court house. It reads as follows: 'I do hereby certify that Robert Sparks and Catherine Fink were lawfully married in the presence of Many People before me the Subscriber One of the Justices of the Peace in and for said County on the Second day of March A.D. 1815. Witness my hand and Seal the 9th instant. [signed] John Moody J.P.'

Catharine Sparks was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Little is known of this branch of the Sparks family, as we have no records from Ohio that pertain to Robert Sparks or his descendants. It is known that Robert and Catharine (Fink) Sparks had at least one child, John Sparks, born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, on May 12, 1823. We have a note copied from a work entitled History of Howard and Chariton Counties, Missouri, pp. 1217-1219, stating that this John Sparks was a son of Robert snd Catharine (Fink) Sparks and that Robert Sparks 'was originally from Maryland, and moved to Pennsylvania when a young man.' There was another Sparks family that moved from Fayette County, Pennsylvania, to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, but Robert Sparks does not appear to have belonged to the same family.)

ROBERT SPARKS, born ca. 1789 in North Carolina, drafted in 1814 in Jasper County, Georgia; resident of Putnam County, Georgia, in 1850. Bounty Land Warrant File 13 249-80-50.

On November 25, 1850, Robert Sparks, a resident of Putnam County, Georgia, appeared before a justice of the peace named J. A. Hawkins to make application for bounty land. He stated that he was 61 years old; that he had served as a private in the company commanded by Capt. Sam Lane in the regiment of militia commanded by Col. Jones in the War of 1812; that he was drafted in Jasper County, Georgia, on October 25, 1814, for six months and was honorably discharged at Fort Hawkins, Georgia, on April 30, 1815, and that he did not receive a written discharge. He signed his name as 'Robert Sparks.' In an attached document, he appointed J. A. Turner of Eatonton, Georgia, as his lawful attorney.

Records searched by the Pension Office in Washington revealed that Robert Sparks had actually served from November 21, 1814, until May 6, 1815. He was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Robert Sparks was listed on the census of Putnam County, Georgia, as early as 1820. He is also listed among the military records of Georgia as having served in the Putnam County Militia as captain from 1824 to 1826. According to the 1850 census, he was born in North Carolina. The wife of Robert Sparks, according to the 1850 census, was named Sarah. She was born in South Carolina about 1792. Census records would seem to indicate that Robert Sparks was a. prosperous farmer; hs owned six slaves in 1830 and a total of 36 in 1850. His real estate was valued at $3600 in 1850. The date of death of Robert Sparks is not known, but on March 3, 1863, he was declared incompetent, and his son, Wilshire Sparks, was appointed his guardian. Robert Sparks had a large family, at least five sons and three daughters, but we can identify positively only one son, Wilshire H. Sparks, who was born August 20, 1820, in Putnam County, Georgia, married Nancy Smith, and died in 1905. It is known that Wilshire Sparks had a son named Charles Worth Sparks, born June 29, 1856, who was living in Vidalia, Georgia, in 1925, and a daughter, Mrs. Texie Hardy of Eatonton, Georgia. According to the 1850 census, three young people named Sparks were living with Robert and Sarah. It would seem probable, however, that they were grandchildren rather than children. Their names were: Arrianda Sparks, born ca. 1832; Robert Sparks, born ca. 1836; and Washington Sparks, born ca. 1840.)

ROBERT SPARKS, born in Steuben, Maine, about 1804, son of Thomas Sparks; a resident of Beverly, Massachusetts, in 1880. Pension File Surv. 0 34 571.

On July 8, 1880, Robert Sparks, a resident of Federal St., Beverly, Essex County, Massachusetts, made application for a pension under the act of 1878. He stated that he was 76 years old and that he had not previously made application for bounty land. He stated that he had been a drummer boy in a company commanded by Capt. Gregory in the Maine Regiment of Volunteers commanded by Col. John Brewer (later Maj. John Balcom) in the War of 1812. He stated that he had enlisted at Robinstown, Maine, on or about 1 January 1813, for one year and that he was honorably discharged at the same place in the latter part of 1814. He stated that he was only 9 years old when he enlisted as a drummer boys added: 'My father, Thomas Sparks, had enlisted previously, and enlisted me. I took the bounty $1. and was taught drumming by one David Beverly of Machias, Maine.' He stated that when he enlisted, he was a 'farmer boy, born in Steuben, Maine, height 5 ft. 2 inches, complexion dark, eyes dark, hair black.' He further declared 'that his father subsequently to enlisting him as above stated, was ordered away from the post, and then this deponent re-enlisted in the same Company and Regiment as above stated and was employed as a waiter upon Ensign Archie Campbell of said Regiment.' He stated that after his discharge he had resided 'in St. George, New Brunswick, most of the time (fifty years)--I have resided for a short time in Beverly, Mass., in 1872, and in Nealville, Wisconsin six months and in Anoka, Minnesota, from 1873 to 1878, and since last date in said Beverly, Mass.' He signed his name as 'Robert Sparks'; the witnesses were John P. Foster and Philo C. Hanson. Both witnesses were residents of Beverly, Massachusetts; Foster was 20 years old, lived on Conning St., and stated he had known Sparks for 3 years; Hanson was 45 years old, lived on Federal St., and stated he had known Sparks for 35 years. They stated 'that they have talked with him many times (20) about his service in said war, and have heard him mention the names of his officers and that he was in the service, and in sight, when Eastport, Maine, was taken.'

Although the Pension Office was unable to locate any record of his service, Robert Sparks was granted a pension of $8.00 per month.

ROBERT U. SPARKS, born ca. 1792, in New Jersey; a resident of Camden, New Jersey. Bounty Land Warrant File 8 474-120-55.

On October 26, 1850, Robert U. Sparks, a resident of the city of Camden, New Jersey, appeared before John Williams, Clerk of the Quarter Sessions Court in Philadelphia to make application for bounty land under the provisions of the act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 58 years old and that he had been a private in the War of 1812 in Capt. Frieze's company in a regiment of Volunteers of New Jersey Militia commanded by Co1. Howell. He stated that he had volunteered on or about September 1, 1814, for 6 months and that he was discharged at Salem, New Jersey, on December 20, 1814, but that he did not receive a written discharge. Records in the Treasury Department prove that his actual service extended from September 27 to December 21, 1814. He signed his name as 'Robert U. Sparks.' He was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 28, 1855, Robert U. Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the act of March 3, 1855. He stated he was 62 years old and a resident of Camden County, New Jersey. He gave no information about himself that he had not given in 1850. John C. Githens and Nathan A. Carter, both residents of Camden, were his witnesses. He was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

On July 17, 1871, Robert U. Sparks, still a resident of Camden, but now aged 79 years, made application for a pension under the act of February 14, 1871. He gave essentially the same information regarding his service in the War of 1812 as he had given earlier, except that he identified his captain more specifically as Henry Freas and his colonel as Joshua Howell. He stated that his wife's name was Amy, and that they had been married in Allowaystown. Clayton Trueax of 17 S. Fifth St., Camden, and Edward S. Cooper of 416 Taylor Ave., Camden, witnessed his signature. A pension was approved in the amount of $8.00 per month. A note in this file indicates that Robert U. Sparks died February 1, 1872.


Pages 738-741

Whole Number 42

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812

BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

(Continued from page 669)

SIMON SPARKS, of Woodbury, Gloucester County, New Jersey; born ca. 1781. Bounty Land Warrant File 4 688-120-55.

On November 24, 1852, Simon Sparks, aged 71 years, a resident of Woodbury, Gloucester County, New Jersey, appeared before Bowman Sailer, a justice of the peace, to make application for bounty land under the Act of Congress dated September 28, 1850. He stated that he had been a private in Capt. Robert A. Armstrong's Company in the Second Regiment of New Jersey Militia commanded by Col. Joshua L. Howell during the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered at Woodbury in August, 1814, 'for what term he does not now remember.' He stated 'that he marched with Captain Armstrong's company from Woodbury to Billingsport on or about the twenty-sixth day of September A.D. 1814, and continued in actual service . . . for the term of three months or thereabouts and was honourably discharged at Woodbury, aforesaid, about Christmas of the same year.' He stated that he had not received a written discharge. He signed his application as 'Simon Sparks.'

War Department records proved that Simon Sparks had served in the unit which he claimed from September 26 to December 22, 1814, and on May 4, 1853, he was issued a warrant (87289) for 40 acres of bounty land.

On March 21, 1855, Simon Sparks appeared before John C. Smallwood, a commissioner of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, to make application for additional bounty land as provided under the Act of Congress dated March 3, 1855. He stated that he was a resident of Woodbury and was 74 years old. Since the Act of 1855 required that each application be signed by two witnesses, William Scott and Aaron M. Wilkins, both of Deptford Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey, appeared as witnesses. He was issued a warrant (4688) for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: We have no data in our files pertaining to the above Simon Sparks.)

SIMON SPARKS, born in New Jersey about !790, died in Montgomery County, Illinois, October 2, 1854; CATHERINE (TEMPLETON) SPARKS, his widow, born in New Jersey about 1790; ANDREW SPARKS, brother of Simon Sparks, born in New Jersey about 1790, Bounty Land Warrant File 76 326-160-55.

On September 18, 1855, Catherine Sparks, aged 67 years, a resident of Christian County, Illinois, appeared before a justice of the peace named Benjamin Mason to make application for bounty land. She swore that she was the widow of Simon Sparks who had been a private in Capt. Jerry Simm's company in the First Regiment of Infantry commanded by Col. John Daugherty in the War of 1812. She stated that her husband had been 'drafted at Springfield, in the county of Champaign (now Clark County) in the State of' Ohio, to guard the frontier on or about the first day of February A.D. 1813 for the term of thirty days, and contined in actual ssrvice in said war for the term of about thirty days and was honorably discharged at Menary's [?] Blockhouse on the border of said county of Champaign (now in Logan) on or about the 28th day of February 1813.' She further stated that she had been married to Simon Sparks 'on or about the last of March A.D. 1813 by one Elias Vickers (of which marriage there is no record evidence) and that her name before her marriage was Catherine Templeton, and that her said husband died at Audubun, Montgomery County, Illinois, on the 2d day of October A.D. 1854 and that she is now a widow." She signed her application by mark. John H. Davis and Anson Cheney, both residents of Christian County, Illinois, signed as witnesses.

Added to this declaration of Catherine Sparks is a sworn statement by Richard Sparks and Simon Sparks, both of Christian County, Illinois, attesting to the fact that Catherine Sparks and her husband, Simon Sparks, had lived together as man and wife. (The relationship of Richard Sparks and Simon Sparks to Catherine Sparks is not revealed in the sworn statement, but it is highly probable that they were sons of Catherine and Simon.)

The Treasury Department reported that the name of Simon Sparks did not appear on the rolls of Col. Daugherty's regiment, and on March 18, 1857, Catherine Sparks, now aged 69 years and a resident of Clay County, Illinois, appeared before a justice of the peace named Daniel Fields to state that Simon Sparks had actually served as a substitute for his brother, Andrew Sparks, and that during his service he 'answered in the name of the said Andrew Sparks.' She was also more specific regarding her marriage, stating 'that she married the said Simon Sparks at Green County, Ohio, about the 15th day of March A.D. 1813 by one Elias Vickers, a Minister of the Gospel.' She again signed by mark. Elbert S. Apperson and Peter Green, both of Clay County, Illinois, witnessed her signature and swore that they had known both Catherine and Simon Sparks before the latter's death and that they had lived together as husband and wife.

Added to this deposition of 1857 is a sworn statement made by Isaac Martin, a resident of Clay County, Illinois, that he had served also in Capt. Jeremiah Simm's company, stating: 'I know of my own knowledge that said Simon Sparks served in said company as above stated; that he served in the place and stead of Andrew Sparks, and that to the best of my recollection, Simon Sparks answered to the name of Andrew Sparks when the rolls of the said company were called and that I think it probable the name of Simon Sparks was never entered on the rolls of said company.' Isaac Martin also swore that he 'saw the said Catherine Sparks and the said Simon Sparks married.' He added that he had received a warrant for 160 acres of land for his service, which was the same as that of Simon Sparks. (Isaac Martin had married Nancy Templeton in Clark County, Ohio, on November 27, 1824.)

Andrew Sparks, brother of Simon Sparks, was still living at this time, a resident of Greene County, Indiana, and on November 10, 1857, he signed the following statement for his sister-in-law, Catherine Sparks, to submit along with her new application, 'I, Andrew Sparks, swear that in the forepart of the year 1813, in Champaine County, in the State of Ohio, I was drafted to serve one month's tour in the War of 1812, in Captain Sims's Company; that I hired my brother Simon Sparks to serve said tour for which I was drafted as aforesaid, that I saw my said brother, Simon Sparks, start to the place of rendevous for to serve said tour, equiped; that he staid the time out for which I was drafted, and that he returned home when said company returned. So help me God.' He signed this statement 'Andrew S. Sparks.' From other records we know that his full name was Andrew Sinnockson Sparks.

The Treasury Department found the name of Andrew Sparks on the rolls of Col. Daugherty's regiment, the evidence submitted by Catherine Sparks was accepted, and she was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: From the above documents, we know that Simon Sparks and Andrew S. Sparks were brothers. Both were living in Greene County, Ohio, in 1813.

According to the marriage records of Greene County, Simon Sparks and Catherine Templeton were married on April 2, 1813; while Andrew S. Sparks and Jane Templeton were married on January 12, 1813. From this it seems apparent that the reason Andrew Sparks hired his brother to take his place in the draft was that he (Andrew) had just been married when he was drafted. Simon was married soon after his return from his tour of duty. Catherine and Jane, since their maiden name was Templeton, were probably sisters.

According to census records, both Simon and Andrew Sparks were born in New Jersey. The fact that Andrew' s middle name was Sinnockson points to their belonging to the Salem County, New Jersey, Sparks family.

According to Mrs. Albert G. Peters of Chicago, who is our authority on the Sparks families of New Jersey, Simon and Andrew S. were probably sons of Sinnockson Sparks (also spelled Siranecsson, Sinneckson, etc.) who was born in New Jersey about 1774. He was connected in some way with the Sinnockson family in Salem County, which was a very prominent family in that area in Colonial times. Sinnockson Sparks was living alone in Lower Penns Neck Township, Salem County, New Jersey, when the 1850 census was taken. His wife, Ann Sparks, had died the same year (1850) and is buried in the St. George P.E. Church Yard at Penns Neck; however, according to her tombstone she was aged 70 when she died, thus born ca. 1780. She could not have been the mother of Simon and Andrew S. Sparks since they were born ca. 1790. Perhaps Ann was Sinnockson Sparks's second wife. Mrs. Peters believes that Sinnockson Sparks, born ca. 1774, was no doubt a son of Capt. Richard Sparks (died 1800) and his wife Anne. Capt. Richard Sparks was a son of Richard Sparks, Sr., and a grandson of the first Simon Sparks who emigrated from England to New Jersey sometime prior to 1739. (See THE SPARKS Quarterly for March, 1968, Vol. VI, No. 1, Whole No. 21, page 286.)

Simon Sparks, who served in the War of 1812, was born ca. 1790; his wife Catherine was also born ca. 1790 and according to census records was also born in New Jersey. Andrew Sinnockson Sparks, brother of Simon, was also born ca. 1790; his wife, Jane (Templeton) Sparks was, according to census records, born in Pennsylvania about 1792.

According to the 1820 census of Greene County, Ohio, Simon and Andrew S. Sparks were both living in Bath Township. The enumeration of the members of their household would seem to indicate that by 1820 Simon Sparks had two sons and one daughter, while Andrew S. Sparks had two sons and two daughters.

Also living in Greene County, Ohio, in 1820 was Thomas Sparks, whom we believe was a brother of Simon and Andrew S. Sparks. Thomas Sparks lived in Sugar Creek Township. He died in 1866. His children were:

(1) Richard Sparks, born ca. 1805;
(2) Charlotte Sparks, born ca. 1807, married Clark;
(3) Ephraim S. Sparks, born 1809;
(4) Ann Sparks, born ca. 1811, married Joseph Davidson;
(5) Rebecca Sparks, born ca. 1814, married Matthew Houston; and
(6) David Sparks, born ca. 1820.

by 1830, Simon Sparks was living in Dayton Township, Montgomery County, Ohio. From the enumeration of his household, it appears that he had three sons and three daughters. Andrew S. Sparks, Simon's brother, was still living in Bath Township, Greene County, Ohio, it. 1830, and from the enumeration of his household, it appears that he had three sons and five daughters.

As Catherine Sparks made clear in her application, her husband Simon Sparks moved with his family to Montgomery County, Illinois, sometime before his death in 1854. This move must have taken place only a short time before his death, however, for when the 1850 census was taken he was a resident of Mad River Township, Clark County, Ohio. Living with Simon and Catherine Sparks in 1850 was Simon C. Sparks, aged 18, thus born ca. 1832. He was doubtless the youngest son and was the same Simon Sparks who, with Richard Sparks, signed the statement added to Catherine's application of September 18, 1855. This Richard Sparks was probably another son who had accompanied the family to Illinois. Richard Sparks purchased and sold land in the town of Taylorsville, Christian County, Illinois, in 1854. Simon C. Sparks also bought a lot in Taylorsville in 1855 which he sold the following year. An A. J. Sparks also bought a lot in Taylorsville in 1855 which he sold the same year.. Perhaps this A. J. Sparks was also a son of Simon and Catherine; he married Sally J. Vermillion in Dane County, Illinois, on April 15, 1857. We have not succeeded in locating any descendants of Simon and Catherine (Templeton) Sparks.

Sometime prior to 1839, Andrew S. Sparks, brother of Simon, moved with his family from Greene County, Ohio, to Greene County, Indiana, where on January 9, 1839, he purchased 80 acres of land from Jesse and Lucinda Oliphant (Deed Book D, p. 150). On February 13, 1839, Andrew S. Sparks and his wife Jane sold this same land to David Templeton (Deed Book E, p. 437). In 1843, he purchased 80 acres from John and Nancy Shipman (Deed Book E, p. 549). In 1844, he obtained patents to three different tracts of land in Greene County, Indiana, from the Federal Government. In these records his name is given in full as Andrew Sinnockson Sparks.

How long Andrew S. Sparks lived after 1857, when he testified in Greene County, Indiana, is not known, and very little is known of his family. The Clerk of the Circuit Court of Greene County reports there is no probate record on file there for Andrew S. Sparks. When he was listed on the 1850 census of Greene County, Indiana, (see page 428 of the September , 1959, issue of the Quarterly), a Mary B. Sparks, aged 17, born in Ohio, was listed in his household--she was doubtless a daughter. Living next; door to Andrew S. Sparks in 1850 was Andrew Sparks, Jr., born ca. 1828, in Ohio, who was doubtless a son. He had married Elizabeth Dobbins on March 14, 1850. A known daughter of Andrew S. Sparks was Rebecca Sparks who was born 1 February 1825, and died in Cedar County, Iowa, December 29, 1906. She married Jacob Moore (1819-1900) on December 8, 1842. Other probable children of Andrew S. and Jane (Templeton) Sparks were: David W. Sparks, born ca. 1814, married Nancy and moved to Kansas; and Sinnookeon (or Sinixon) Sparks, born ca. 1823, married Malinda Moore in Greene County, Indiana, on April 4, 1842. Charles Sparks, born ca. 1830, married Ann Rupell in Greene County, Indiana, on May 8, 1849, may also have been a son of Andrew S. and Jane (Templeton) Sparks. According to notes made by a descendant a number of years ago, there is some reason to believe there were also Sons named Alexander Sparks and Jason Sparks.

For several years, Mrs. Robert A. Hughes of St. Louis, Missouri, has been seeking proof of the parentage of her husband's great-grandfather, John Templeton Sparks, who was born in Greene County (later Clark County), Ohio, on October 17, 1813, and died in National City, California, on April 8, 1891. He lived most of his life in White County, Indiana, and on the 1880 census indicated that his father's birth place was New Jersey but that his mother was born in Pennsylvania. It seems very probable that John Templeton Sparks was also a son of Andrew S. and Jane (Templeton) Sparks. If so, he would have been their eldest son, since they were married on January 12, 1813.

We shall be very interested in hearing from any readers of this article who descend from this branch of the Sparks family.)


Pages 757-758
Whole Number 43

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

SOLOMON SPARKS , born January 4, 1787, in Washington County, Pennsylvania; died May 21, 1860, in Taylor County, Virginia (now West Virginia). married Rachel Nixon. Bounty Land Warrant File 22-144-80-55.

On December 3, 1850, Solomon Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace in Pruntytown, Taylor County, West Virginia (then Virginia), named Joshua 0. Robinson to make application for bounty land. He stated that he was 64 years old and a resident of Taylor County; that he had been a private in Capt. Gabriel Wilkinson's company in the Fifth Regiment of Virginia Militia commanded by Col. Street in the War of 1812. Solomon Sparks stated that he had performed this service as a substitute for Lewis Yates who was drafted at Garrison County in 1814 (he could not remember the date) and that he served for a term of almost six months, being honorably discharged at Fort Nelson, Virginia, in February, 1815. (Records in the Treasury Department of this regiment revealed that Solomon Sparks had served from August 31, 1814, to March 19, 1815.) Solomon Sparks stated that he had received a written discharge, but that it had been lost. He signed his application as "Solomon Sparks."On July 23, 1851, be was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land.

On May 19, 1855, Solomon Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the new act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was now 66 years old and still a resident of Taylor County. He gave no new information regarding himself.

He again signed his name as "Solcmon Sparks'-- Isaac A. Morris and Benjamin F. Baldwin, both residents of Taylor County, signed as witnesses, He was issued a warrant for 80 acres of additional bounty land.

(Editor's Note: The above Solomon Sparks was born January 4, 1787, in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and died in Taylor County, Virginia (now West Virginia) on May 21, 1860. He married Rachel Nixon, who was born in 1791 and died in Taylor County on February 9, 1875. She was buried in the Nixon Cemetery on U.S. 250 near Pruntytown. It is probable that Solomon Sparks was buried there also, but there is no stone with his name. This Solomon Sparks was a son of George and Rachel (Norris) Sparks, who were married in 1785 in Washington County, Pennsylvania; they later moved to that section of Virginia which is now in Taylor County, West Virginia. George Sparks, father of Solomon, was born in the 1750's and served in the American Revolution, being taken a prisoner by the British in New York in Nov, 1782. George Sparks was a son of George and Mary Sparks of Washington County, Pennsylvania. For additional data on this family, see The Sparks Quarterly of June, 1963 (Vol. XI, No. 2, Whole No. 42) pp. 728-734. See also the the record of Anna (Sparks) Snyder, sister of Solomon Sparks, which appears in this issue of the Quarterly , page 759.

We have only scattered references to Solomon Sparks in West Virginia. Since Taylor County was not created until 1844, his name appeared on the 1830 census of Harrison County, which then included the part of what is now Taylor County where be lived. He was listed with his wife and three boys (one under 5; one between 5 and 10; and one between 10 and 15) and four girls (one under 5; two between 5 and 10; and one between 10 and 15). When the 1850 census was taken of Taylor County, Solomon's family was listed as follows:

Name
Age
Birth Place
Occupation
Value of Real Estate
Sparks, Solomon 65 Penna Farmer $500
Rachael 60 "    
Sarah 30 Virginia    
George 30 " Laborer  
Charlotte 28 "    
Mary 26 "    
Solomon 25 " Laborer  
John 21 " "  
Sarah 20 "    
Sarah 19      

It will be noted that there are three women in this family named Sarah; from the way in which they are listed it would appear they were all daughters, in which case the census taker must have made a mistake in writing their names. Two of them may, of course, have been relatives.

Solomon Sparks did not leave a will. His son, George W. Sparks, who seems to have been the oldest son, reported his death to the county clerk, stating that Solomon had died from "old age."We know that this George W. Sparks was born August 14, 1819, and died January 10, 1895--these dates appear on his tomb stone in the Nixon Cemetery on U.S. 250 near Pruntytown, Taylor County, West Virginia. His wife's name was Sina; she was born January 2, 1823, and died December 7, 1873.

The only other child of Solomon and Rachel (Nixon) Sparks on whom we have any information is Solomon Sparks, Jr., who was born September 8, 1824, and died November 3, 1894. According to his tombstone in the Nixon Cemetery, he was a soldier in the Civil War.

One other Sparks family was listed on the 1850 census of Taylor County, West Virginia, (then Virginia). The ages of the members of this family present a problem--perhaps that of John Sparks, given first, is an error--perhaps he was really 41 instead of 21. He may, on the other hand, not have been the husband of Margaret, whose age is given as 36, but may have been her son and was listed first because he had succeeded his father as head of the household. The family was given as follows:

Sparks, John

21

Virginia Farmer $1100 "
Margaret
36
"     "
Luvina
18
"     "
Mary Jane
14
"     "
John
12
"     "
Syntha
10
"     "
Whitaker, Erny
21
"     "

We shall welcome additional information on this family from descendants.)



Pages 780-783
Whole Number 44

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS
(Continued from page 760)


SOLOMON SPARKS, born ca. 1793, in Wilkes County, North Carolina; a resident of Cherokee County, North Carolina, prior to 1850. Bounty Land Warrant File 17 850-80-55.

On June 7, 1852, Solomon Sparks, a resident of Fort Hembreo (?), Cherokee County, North Carolina, appeared before Edward Rogers, a justice of the peace in Union County, Georgia, to make application for bounty land under the provisions of the Act of Congress dated March 22, 1852. He stated that he was 69 years of age and that he had been a private in the company commanded by Captain McLane in the 7th Regiment of North Carolina Militia commanded by Col. J. A. Pearson in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered in Wilkes County, North Carolina, about February 1, 1814, to serve for six months, and was honorably discharged at Salisbury, North Carolina, on September 1, 1814. He appointed John S. Fain of Blairsville, Union County, Georgia, as his lawful attorney "to process the within mentioned claim." Solomon Sparks signed his application by mark.

Along with his application, Solomon Sparks submitted his certificate of discharge dated September 1, 1814, and signed by Col. J. A. Pearson. Records in the War Department indicated that he had actually served from March 1, 1814, to July 16, 1814, although his discharge was dated September 1. He was issued a warrant (No. 292) for 80 acres of land on November 29, 1852.

On April 13, 1855, Solomon Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace named J. R. Dyche in Cherokee County, North Carolina, to apply for additional bounty land under the new act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was now 80 years of age, still a resident of Cherokee County. He gave no new information about himself in this application. He signed his name to the application on this occasion. Joel Sparks and Benjamin Hariss, both of Cherokee County, signed as witnesses.

(Note by Paul E. Sparks: This Solomon Sparks was probably a son of John Sparks, a Revolutionary War pensioner of Wilkes County, North Carolina (see the Quarterly of Dec, 1955, Vol. III, No. 4, pp. 97-104.) In the account of the children of John Sparks, a probable son, Solomon, is mentioned on page 102. Subsequent research has proven that this Solomon was not a son of John Sparks as suggested there, but was probably a son of Solomon Sparks, Jr., a brother of John. (See pages 382-400 of the Quarterly of June 1959 (Vol. VII, No. 2.)

Little is known of Solomon Sparks, probable son of John. Tradition in the Sparkses of Little Fork of Little Sandy River, Elliott County, Kentucky, says that there was a Solomon Sparks who lived there for a while and then returned to Wane, North Carolina. Warne is located in Cherokee County. This Solomon is said to have been the father of Joel Sparks, who was well known in Elliott County.

In 1811, William Pigg obtained a land grant from John Sparks in Wilkes County, North Carolina. Chain Bearers in the Survey were Solomon Sparks and Joel Sparks. Since this Joel was a son of John Sparks, it is natural to assume that Solomon was a brother or closely related. Solomon Sparks, probable son of John, was listed on the 1820 census of Wilkes County with three sons and two daughters. He had left Wilkes County before 1830.

The 1850 census of Cherokee County, North Carolina, lists Solomon Sparks, aged 60, a farmer, born in North Carolina, with a wife, Julia Sparks, aged 44, also born in North Carolina. Living with Solomon was his son Joel Sparks, aged 22, also a farmer, born in Kentucky. There was one other Sparks family living in Cherokee County in 1850, Samuel P. Sparks, aged 29, a farmer, born in North Carolina; living with him was Mary Sparks, doubtless his wife, aged 22, also born in North Carolina; also Jeremiah Sparks, aged 5, and Jackson Sparks, aged 1 year, both born in North Carolina.

by 1880, Joel Sparks, son of Solomon, was living in Elliott County, Kentucky. He was listed on the census of that year as Joel Sparks, Sr., aged 55, a farmer, born in North Carolina. Living with him was his wife, Mary Sparks, aged 44, born in North Carolina, and the following children: (1) George W. Sparks, aged 23, born in Ohio; (2) John W. Sparks, aged 14, born in Ohio; (3) Irena Sparks, aged 20, born in Ohio; and (4) Julia E. Sparks, aged 12, born in Kentucky. Also living with Joel Sparks was his mother, Juda A. Sparks, aged 76, born in North Carolina. Note that her name was given as Julia on the 1850 census of Cherokee County, North Carolina.

Since Joel Sparks was closely related to the Lawrence and Elliott Counties, Kentucky, set of Sparkses - - and since this set of Sparkses descended from John Sparks, the Wilkes County, North Carolina, Revolutionary soldier, it is quite natural to assume that his (Joel's) father, Solomon Sparks, was a brother or closely related to George and Levi Sparks, sons of John, who settled in that section of Kentucky about 1820. However, more definite proof will need to be established.)

32.1.1 STEPHEN SPARKS, born in 1775 in what is now Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; died August 9, 1851, in Jackson County, Indiana. Bounty Land Warrant File 34 698-40-50.

On December 10, 1850, Stephen Sparks, aged 76 years, a resident of Jackson County, Indiana, appeared before a notary public named .John M. Ford to make application for bounty land under the act of September 28, 1850. He swore that he had been a private in a company commanded by Capt. Craven Payton in the Indiana Mounted Rangers in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered in 1812, he could not remember the month and the day, for a term of 12 months, and that he was discharged sometime in 1813. He stated that his company was never attached to any regiment and that he did not receive a written discharge. He signed his name by mark.

Records in the Treasury Department proved that Stephen Sparks had served in the company that he claimed, but that he had entered service on May 1, 1813, and had served until August 25, 1813. He was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land on March 4, 1851.

On May 9, 1859, C. A. Barkley of Louisville, Kentucky, wrote to the Commissioner of Pensions "at the request of son and heir of Mr. Sparks" that he had died before the issue of the warrant; that "no widow is alive and the heirs are scattered and numerous" so that it was hardly worth bothering attempting to divide it among the heirs. None of the heirs were named in this letter, however.

(Editor's Note: 32.1.1 Stephen Sparks was a son of 32.1 James Sparks, who was born in Cranberry, New Jersey, about 1750. James Sparks moved with his father, 32. Richard Sparks, and several brothers to what became Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, prior to the American Revolution; then in 1782 to Jefferson County, Kentucky; and finally, after several other moves, to Jackson County, Indiana, about 1822. James Sparks served in the American Revolution; his application for a pension was published in the September , 1954, issue of The Sparks Quarterly (Vol. II, No. 3, pp. 40-45). Stephen Sparks, son of James, was born in June 25, 1775, in what is now Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. He moved with his father to Kentucky in 1782 and while living in Jefferson County, Kentucky, was married on August 13, 1799, to Catherine Padget (called Catha on the license).

by May 25, 1813, Stephen Sparks and his brother, 32.1.7 Moses Sparks, were living in a settlement called Driftwood in Harrison County, Indiana. On that date, they and a number of other settlers signed a petition asking that Stephen Sparks be permitted to erect a water grist mill and saw mill. (See The Territorial Papers of the United States, Vol. VII, p. 259). Prior to 1816, Stephen Sparks and his family moved to what became Jackson County, Indiana, settling at the spot that is now the village of Sparksville (see The Sparks Quarterly of Dec, 1954, Vol. II, No. 4, p. 52.) Here Stephen Sparks established a ferry across the White River and, because of its convenience, being situated on the principal line of travel between Washington and Lawrence Counties, became well known. In the History of Jackson County, Indiana, published in 1886 by Brant & Fuller, it was stated that Stephen Sparks erected a tread mill at his ferry "and all who patronized it were compelled to loan the use of their horses or oxen to furnish power to do the grinding." (p. 377) Stephen Sparks was a member of the first grand jury in Jackson County which met on April 7, 1817. He was active in the local militia and in later years was called Major Sparks.

Stephen Sparks died August 9, 1851, and was buried in the Sparksville Cemetery. His wife, Catherine, was still living in 1850 when the census was taken, but had died by 1859. They were the parents of a number of children; we do not have a complete list, but we have limited information on the following.

32.1.1.1 James Sparks, son of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks, was born early in the 1800's and died August 3, 1865. He married Elizabeth Hamilton in Washington County, Indiana, on June 22, 1825. She died August 23, 1884. They are known to have had at least one son named 32.1.1.1.1 William H. Sparks, born September 1l, 1830. He married, first, June 16, 1857, Semira Trueblood; second, on February 23, 1869, Lydia A. Payne.

32.1.1.1.2. Richard A. Sparks, son of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks, was born ca. 1805; he was living in Jackson County, Indiana, in 1850. He was married twice, first to Julia Ann Cummins in Jackson County on June 17, 1830. She died February 16, 1849, at the age of 39 years and 5 months. They had at least the following children:

32.1.1.1.2.1 Catherine Sparks, born ca. 1831.
32.1.1.1.2.2 Philanda Sparks, born ca. 1833, married Charles H. Fowler in 1851.
32.1.1.1.2.3 Major Sparks, born ca. 1837.
32.1.1.1.2.4 James C. Sparks, born ca. 1840, killed in the Civil War in 1862. Richard A. Sparks married, second, Hannah, who was born June 29, 1813, and died January 28, 1859. Richard A. and Hannah Sparks are known to have had at least one son:
32.1.1.1.2.5 Richard F. Sparks.

32.1.1.1.3. Hiram Sparks, son of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks, married, first, Elizabeth Albert. They had two children:

32.1.1.1.3.1 Stephen Sparks, married Nancy Jones on March 15, 1856.
32.1.1.1.3.2 Amanda Sparks, married Thomas Car on February 8, 1853.
Hiram Sparks married, second, Margaret S. Walker on November 27, 1837. Hiram and Margaret had one child:
32.1.1.1.3.3 Betty Sparks, married Daniel Hosea.

32.1.1.1.4. Uriah Sparks, son of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks, died prior to 1848, leaving minor heirs named Arena, Isaac, and Jacob. In 1848, Stephen and Catherine Sparks gave a 65-acre farm to these three grandchildren. It is known that Arena married John Cartwright on December 19, 1848.

32.1.1.1.5. Amanda Catherine Sparks, daughter of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks, was born February 16, 1822, and died at Medora, Indiana, on September 22, 1892. She married on June 17, 1835, Villorous Wray (1810-1899).

32.1.1.1.6. Ward Sparks, son of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks. Nothing is known of him save his name.

32.1.1.1.7. William Harrison Sparks (called Harrison), son of Stephen and Catherine (Padget) Sparks, was born November 27, 1811, and died September 2, 1893. He was buried at Leesville, Indiana. He was married four times. He married, first, Desire King, who died August 30, 1837; second, Eliza Hosea (or Hosey), who died in April, 1850; third, Joanna Summers on November 25, 1850, in Jackson County, Indiana; and fourth, Nancy Weddle, who was born March 12, 1829. It is known that he had a son named 32.1.1.1.7.1 George Washington Sparks who was born April 17, 1841, and was thus a son of the second wife, Eliza.


Pages 818-822
Whole Number 46

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

THOMAS SPARKS, of Montgomery County, Maryland, and Montgomery County, Indiana; born ca. 1790 in Maryland. Land Warrant File 36 524-120-55.

On January 21, 1851, Thomas Sparks, a resident of Montgomery County, Indiana, appeared before a notary public named John S. M. Vanbleau to make application for bounty land under the provisions of the Congressional act of September 21, 1850. He stated that he was 61 years old; that he had been a private in Capt. Orrick's Company in the 41st Regiment of Maryland Militia commanded by Col. William Hutchens in the War of 1812. He stated that he had been drafted at Chincapin Hill in Maryland on or about August 25, 1814, and continued in service until November 12, 1814. He stated that he had not reoeived a written discharge. He signed his application as "Thos. Sparks."

Records in the Treasury Department confirmed his claim, except that they indicated he was actually discharged on November 31, 1814. He was issued warrant number 27,151 for 40 acres of bounty land.

On April 9, 1855, Thomas Sparks, still a resident of Montgomery County, Indiana, appeared before a notary public named James Heaton to make application for additional bounty land under the new act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 65 and stated that he had been drafted at Baltimore County, Maryland. He gave the same information about his service as he had earlier. He signed his name as "Thomas Sparks." James Baughor (or Baughan ?) and John D. Vanghan signed as witnesses. Thomas Sparks named Congressman J. B. McDonnald as his representative. He was issued warrant number 36,524 for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's note: Thomas Sparks was a son of Thomas and Rachel (Perdue) Sparks of Baltimore County, Maryland, and a grandson of Josiah and Penelopy (Brown) Sparks. (See the Quarterly of June, 1958, Vol. VI, No. 2, Whole No. 22, page 298 - - at the time that issue appeared we had not identified Thomas Sparks in Indiana.) On the 1850 census of Montgomery County, Indiana, Thomas Sparks was listed as a resident of Franklin Township. His age was given as 72, whereas in his application for bounty land in 1851 he stated he was 61 years old and in 1855 he stated he was 65. It would appear that the census record was incorrect. Living with Thomas Sparks in 1850 was Jinsey Sparks, aged 47, born in North Carolina, who was doubtlessly his wife. There was also a Jinsey Williams, aged 15, in the family who was probably a relative. Also living with Thomas Sparks in 1850 were the following, probably Sons:

Andrew Sparks, born ca. 1823 in Ohio.
Thomas " " " 1829 in Indiana.
Jonathan " " " 1835 in "
Laban " " " 1837 in "
Walter " " " 1840 in "

Since the eldest, Andrew J. Sparks, was born in Ohio, it would seem likely that Thomas Sparks moved from Maryland to Ohio, then, between 1823 and 1829, to Indiana.)

THOMAS SPARKS, of Pittsylvania County, Virginia; born ca. 1795; married Nancy Wright in 1817. Land Warrant File 19-145-80-55. Pension File, Surv. C 13-443.

On April 19, 1851, Thomas Sparks, a resident of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, appeared before a justice of the peace named H. G. Daniel to make application for bounty land under the Congressional act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was "about 57 years of age;" that he had served as a private in Capt. William Linn's company in the 7th Regiment of Virginia Militia commanded by Lt. Col. David Saunders in the War of 1812; that he was mustered into service at Beaver's in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, on or about August 16, 1814, for the term of 6 months. He stated that he had been discharged at Camp, Fort Barbour, Norfolk, Virginia, on February 22, 1815, at the expiration of his term. He signed his application by mark. On the same date he appointed A. S. Buford of Pittsylvania County his lawful attorney.

With his application, Thomas Sparks submitted the written discharge that had been issued to him on February 22, 1815, at Camp, Fort Barbour, Norfolk, Virginia, by his captain, William Linn. It was also signed by Col. David Saunders.

Thomas Sparks's application was approved and he was issued Land Warrant No. 35230 f or 80 acres of bounty land.

On April 6, 1855, Thomas Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace in Pittsylvania County named Greenbery Thornton to make application for additional bounty land under the new act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was still a resident of Pittsylvania County and that he was 63 years old. He gave essentially the same information about himself as he had in 1851. He again signed his application by mark. James Haizlip and James A. Thomas signed as witnesses (the latter by mark).

Again his application was approved, and Thomas Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 acres of additional bounty land.

On April 24, 1871, Thomas Sparks appeared before the clerk of the Pittsylvania County Court to make application for a pension under provisions of the Congressional act of February 14, 1871. He declared that he was a resident of the town of Whitmell, Pittsylvania County, Virginia; he stated that he bad been married to Nancy Wright on July 8, 1817, in Caswell County, North Carolina. He gave the same information about his service as he had in 1851, except that he stated he had been drafted and had served under Capt. Nathaniel Wilson as well as William Linn. He again signed by mark. A. G. Pritchett and C. H. Tompkins, both of Pittsylvania County, signed as witnesses. John W. Cole, the postmaster of Pittsylvania Court House, signed a statement that both Pritchett and Tompkins were men of "undoubted good character for truth and veracity."

Thomas Sparks's application for a pension was approved on February 28, 1872, in the amount of $8.00 per month. There is nothing in this file to indicate when Thomas Sparks died.

(Editor' s note: Data on the Sparks family of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, were published in the Quarterly of September , 1955 (Vol. III, No. 3, Whole No. 11) and that of March, 1956 (Vol. IV, No. 1, Whole No. 13) Thomas Sparks, whose application was abstracted above, was born ca. 1795. He apparently was unsure of his age--on the 1850 census his age was given as 50, but the following year, on his application, he stated he was "about 57." We cannot be sure of the parentage of Thomas Sparks, although he was probably the Thomas Sparks who was the youngest son of Matthew and Kezia (Stone) Sparks, both of whom had died prior to 1811. Thomas Sparks stated in 1871 that he had married Nancy Wright in Caswell County, North Carolina (which adjoins Pittsylvania County, Virginia, on the south) on July 8, 1817. According to the 1850 census, it would appear that they were the parents of at least the following: (1) Susan L Sparks, born ca. 1825; (2) Sandy I. Sparks, a son, born ca. 1828; (3) Jane Sparks, born ca. 1831; (4) Matthew Sparks, born ca. 1834; and (5) Mary Sparks, born ca. 1837.)

THOMAS SPARKS, of Rhode Island and Spencer, Tioga County, New York; died in 1813 at Sacketts Harbor while a soldier in the U.S. Army; married Margaret Cowell February 17, 1812, at Spencer, New York. Bounty Land Warrant File 27 814-160-12 and Pension File OWW 13 920.

On June 26, 1851, Margaret Sparks, a resident of the town of Spencer, in Tioga County, New York, appeared before James H. Bostwick, a justice of the peace, to make application for bounty land under the Congressional act of September 28, 1850. She stated that she was 65 years old and that she was the widow of Thomas Sparks who had served as a private in a company commanded by a Capt. Batty or Beattie in the War of 1812. She did not know the name of the regiment. She believed that he had enlisted sometime in 1813 at Providence, Rhode Island, for the term of 5 years. She stated that he had remained in service for 2 years when he died. She stated that she had been married to Thomas Sparks in Spencer, New York, in February, 1812, by Joel Barker, a justice of the peace, and that her name before her marriage was Margaret Cowell. She said her husband died at Sacketts Harbour sometime in 1815 (later it was proved he had died in 1813), but she could not recall the month or the day. She stated that she had no proof of her marriage, but that she was still a widow. She signed her application in a clear hand as "Margaret Sparks."

To accompany her application, Margaret Sparks submitted a statement signed by Jonathan Vorhis and his wife, Betsey Vorhis, aged 63 and 57 respectively, residents of Spencer, on July 28, 1851, swearing that they were well acquainted with Margaret Sparks and had been well acquainted with her husband, Thomas Sparks, in his lifetime, and that they had been present at their marriage in February, 1812. They signed this statement before a justice of the peace named Augustus T. Garey.

Upon receipt of Margaret Sparks's application, the Commissioner of Pensions asked the Treasury Department for proof of Thomas Sparks's service. On September 14, 1852, the Treasury Department reported that documents on file there proved that Thomas Sparks had been a private in Capt. William Batty's company in the 25th Regiment of U.S. Infantry from his enlistment on March 29, 1813, until November 25, 1813, "when he died in the service of the United States."

When Margaret Sparks submitted her application for bounty land, the Commissioner of Pensions asked for proof regarding all heirs of Thomas Sparks, and on November 18, 1852, a Tioga County judge named W. F. Warner signed a statement that "Olive Sparks is the only child and legal heir of Thomas Sparks." On November 24, 1852, land warrant no. 27-814 for 160 acres of bounty land was issued to Olive Sparks, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Cowell) Sparks.

On September 12, 1853, Margaret Sparks appeared before Presiding Judge Charles P. Avery in Tioga County, New York, to make application for "whatever benefits she may be entitled to and by virtue of the Acts of July 4, 1836, July 20, 1848, and February 22, 1849, or April 16, 1816," in other words, a pension. She was still a resident of Spencer; she now gave her age as 67. She gave essentially the same information as in 1851, except that she stated Thomas Sparks had served under both Capt. Batty and Capt. Ketchem, and gave his death as November 25, 1813. She also gave the exact date of her marriage--February 17, 1812. Whereas she had signed her application in 1851, she now made her mark. George Crosson and C. P. Avery signed as witnesses.

With her application in 1853, Margaret Sparks submitted a sworn statement made by Lewis Cowell, a resident of Spencer and probably a close relative, dated September 7, 1853, that she .vas the widow of Thomas Sparks. She submitted a similar sworn statement by Henry Miller, also of Spencer, dated September 7, 1853. On September 8, 1853, Jonathan Vorhis, aged 64 and a resident of Spencer, again swore that he had been present when Margaret Cowell and Thomas Sparks were married on February 17, 1812, at Spencer. Betsey Vorhis signed a similar statement on September 8, 1853, stating that she had also been present at the marriage which had been performed by Joseph Barker, a justice of the peace.

The application of Margaret Sparks was approved and under an act of February 3, 1853, a pension of $3.50 per month for a period of five years was approved effective on September 12, 1858.

The reason why Margaret Sparks submitted so many sworn statements to prove that she had been married to Thomas Sparks was that relatives of Thomas Sparks claimed there had been no such marriage. One of the documents in the file is a court order from Erie County, New York, dated March 24, 1857, appointing Arnold Irons administrator of the estate of Thomas Sparks, who, it was claimed had died intestate 44 years earlier, in 1813. (The purpose of this court order was obviously to gain any benefits to which Thomas Sparks was entitled from the government for his brother and three sisters.) The Court declared that Thomas Sparks had "left no widow or child" and that "his father and mother are dead and Betsey Irons, Sylvia Northrup, Sally Smith, and Henry W. Sparks are his brothers and sisters and the only heirs in law of Thomas Sparks, deceased."

On February 20, 1858, Betsey Irons, a resident of Hamburgh, Erie County, New York, swore before Nelson Jones, Clerk of Deeds in Erie County, that she was a sister and one of the heirs of Thomas Sparks who had enlisted at Providence, Rhode Island, under Capt. Batty on March 29, 1813, and died in service on. November 25, 1813. As she was advised that for his service there had been allowed and remitted to the administrator of his estate some $87.43, she demanded her share. She stated that at the time of his death, Thomas Sparks was single and left no child, that his parents were dead, and that she, Sylvia Northrup, Sally Smith, and Henry W. Sparks, his sisters and brother, were his only heirs. Christopher Armstrong and Daniel C. Beard, both of Buffalo, signed as witnesses.

Whether Margaret Sparks received any of this service pay or not is unknown, but on 3 February 1858, her five-year pension expired and on March 21, 1859, she applied once more. She now gave her age as 70 years and stated that she had moved from the town of Spencer and was living in the town of Van Etterville in Chemung County. She signed her application by mark before A. T. Ga.rey, justice of the peace. Sheppard Bassett and Isaac Stanclift, both of Spencer, signed as witnesses and swore that Margaret was a widow of Thomas Sparks, "all of which they know from a long and intimate acquaintance with her and her family and its circumstarices and domestic relations." Also on March 21, 1859, Margaret Sparks again appointed Henry H. Bostwick of Auburn, New York, as her attorney.

On April 13, 1859, Margaret Sparks was again allowed a pension of $3.50 per month effective as of September 12, 1858. There are no subsequent records in this file.

THOMAS SPARKS, of Salem County, New Jersey, born ca. 1793, died 1822; married Phebe Mayhew, April 20, 1816. Bounty Land Warrant File 77-970-120-55.

On February 15, 1853, Phebe Sparks, of the township of Upper Pilesgrove, in Salem County, New Jersey, appeared before a notary public named William L. Oleaver (?) to make application for bounty land under provisions of the Congressional act of September 28, 1850. She stated that she was 60 years old and the widow of Thomas Sparks, deceased, who had been a private in a company commanded by Capt. Peter Sanders in the New Jersey Militia commanded by Col. Joshua L. Howell in the War of 1812. She stated that her husband, Thomas Sparks, had been drafted in Salem County for a term of six months; she did not indicate the date he was drafted, but stated that he had been discharged on December 23, 1814. Phebe Sparks swore that she had been married to Thomas Sparks in Salem County on April 20, 1816, by one John Boqua, a minister of the Gospel, and that her name before her marriage had been Phebe Mayhew. She stated that her husband had died at Upper Penn's Neck, Salem County, New Jersey, on March 24, 1822, and that she was still his widow. She signed her application as "Phebe Sparks."

Accompanying this application is a sworn statement of Josiah Ale dated February 22, 1853, that he had served with Thomas Sparks in Capt. Sander's Company and that he had known Thomas and Phebe Sparks and that they had lived together as man and wife. Also in this file is a sworn statement dated March 24, 1853, by David Sparks to the effect that he was a brother of Thomas Sparks and that he was well acquainted with his brother's wife, Phebe Sparks, and that she was still his widow.

Phebe Sparks also submitted a certified copy, signed by Samuel Capner, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas, of the record of marriage of Thomas Sparks and Phebe Mayhew "in Book B of marriages, page 89, in this office," as recorded on March 22, 1817. The record reads: "April 20th, 1816, Thomas Sparks & Febe Mahue both of the county of Salem and at. of New Jersey were joined together in wedlock by me. [signed] John Boqua, minister."

The application of Phebe Sparks was approved and she was issued warrant no. 87681 for 40 acres of bounty land. Records in the Treasury Department proved that Thomas Sparks had served in Capt. Sander's Company, Col. Joshua L. Howell's Regiment of New Jersey Militia from September 27, 1814, to December 21, 1814, and that his rank had been sergeant.

On April 17, 1855, Phebe Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace named Charles F. H. Grey, to make application for additional bounty land under the act of March 3,1855. She stated she was now 63 years old, still a resident of Salem County. Edward T. Wase and Jeremiah B. Fox signed as witnesses. Again, Josiah Ale, now 69 years old, swore that he had served with Thomas Sparks in Capt. Sander's company.

On December 19, 1855, Elizabeth Lloyd, aged 57, a resident of Pilesgrove Township, Salem County, swore that Thomas Sparks had been her brother and that she "was to see Thomas Sparks while he was in camp at Billingsport." She stated that she knew Thomas and Phebe Sparks were married and she added that she had attended the funeral of Thomas Sparks, her brother, and saw him buried. She signed her name as "Elizabeth Lloyd."

The application of Phebe Sparks was approved and she was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's note: Mrs. Albert G. Peters, our authority on the Sparks family of New Jersey, reports that there can be little doubt but that this Thomas Sparks (born ca. 1793 and died 1822) was a son of Thomas Sparks, born 1760, of Pilesgrove, Salem County, New Jersey, who married Sarah. The inscription on this elder Thomas Sparks's gravestone in the Old Pilesgrove M.E. Cemetery at Sharpstown, New Jersey, reads: "Thomas Sparks died May 26, 1801 aged 41.4 years." That of his wife reads: "Sarah Sparks, wife of Thomas Sparks, died September 6, 1854, aged 86 years." In his will dated May 20, 1801, the elder Thomas Sparks left all his real and personal property to his wife, Sarah, until his sons should "come of age." He named his children as:

David Sparks,
Aaron Sparks,
Thomas Sparks,
Jesse Sparks, and
Elizabeth Sparks.

We have no data on the children of Thomas and Phebe (Mayhew) Sparks.)


Pages 842-847
Whole Number 47

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

URIAH SPARKS, born in North Carolina about 1797; a resident of Morgan County, Georgia, in 1815; lived later in Newton County and Carroll County, Georgia. Land Warrant File 13 318-80-55.

On November 28, 1850, Uriah Sparks, a resident of Carroll County, Georgia, appeared before a justice of the peace named Arthur Hutcheson to apply for bounty land under the provisions of the Congressional act of September 25, 1850. He stated that he was 53 years old and that he had served in the War of 1812 as a private in the company commanded by Capt. Henry Lane in the Rifle Battalion commanded by Col. Jones. He stated that he volunteered in Morgan County, Georgia, on November 1, 1814, for the term of 6 months, and continued in actual service for the length of his term and was honorably discharged at Fort Hawkins on or about May 1, 1815. He stated that he did not receive a written discharge. He signed his name as "Uriah Sparks."

Records in the Treasury Department revealed that Uriah Sparks had actually served from November 21, 1814, until May 6, 1815, and he was issued land warrant no. 10,385 for 80 acres of bounty land.

On April 10, 1855, Uriah Sparks applied for additional bounty land under the provisions of the Congressional act of March 3, 1855. He gave his age as 57 and stated that he was still a resident of Carroll County, Georgia. He gave essentially the same information about his service as in 1850, except that he stated that his company was made up of rifle men. He again signed his application as "Uriah Sparks," and William A. Johnson and Richard L. Winkles, both residents of Carroll County, signed as witnesses.

Uriah Sparks was issued a land warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Although Uriah Sparks stated that he enlisted in Morgan County, Georgia, we have found no Morgan County record containing his name. Perhaps he was related to the David Sparks who also enlisted in Morgan County and was also a member of Capt. Henry Lane's company; David Sparks and Uriah Sparks both stated that they had enlisted on November 1, 1814. (For an abstract of David Sparks's bounty land application file, see the Quarterly of September ,1960, Vol. VIII, No. 3, Whole No. 31, p. 501.) Perhaps Uriah Sparks was also related to the John Sparks of Morgan County about whom we published data in the Quarterly of March, 1961 (Vol. IX, No. 1, Whole No. 33, pp. 540-42).

Uriah Sparks probably lived in that part of Morgan County that went to help form Newton County, which was created in 1821. Uriah Sparks was listed as a resident of Newton County on the 1830 census. His family at that time consisted of a female (probably his wife) between 30 and 40; 2 males between 5 and 10; and 2 males under 5. Apparently the first wife of Uriah Sparks died between 1830 and 1832, for he was married in Newton County, Georgia, to Mrs. Sarah Whatley in 1832.

by 1837, Uriah Sparks had moved to Carroll County, Georgia, for on July 4, 1837, he purchased a tract of land in Carroll County from Levi Phillips, Sr. and Levi Phillips, Jr. (Deed Book C, p. 171) On July 3, 1840, he purchased another tract from William R. Duke (Book D, p. 98); this tract was "on the road from Pyre Watson's to Reubin Newton's." On September 1, 1846, Uriah Sparks sold the tract he had purchased in 1840 to J. and A. Hutchison. The witnesses to this deed were William Sparks and Green Sparks.

Uriah Sparks was listed on the 1840 census of Carroll County. At that time his household consisted of himself, aged 40 to 50; 1 female (probably his wife) between 30 and 40; 2 males between 15 and 20; 2 males between 10 and 15; 1 male under 5; two females between 5 and 10; and one female under 5.

Uriah Sparks was listed on the 1850 census of Carroll County in the 11th division; his occupation was given as farmer, his age as 50, and the value of his real estate as $1000. His birth place was given as North Carolina. He owned no slaves. His wife, Sarah, was listed as 42 years of age, a native of Georgia. The following, all probably the children of Uriah and Sarah Sparks, were listed in their household:

1. Mary Sparks, born ca. 1833.
2. Simeon Sparks, born ca. 1837.
3. Sarah Sparks, born ca. 1839.
4. C. N. Sparks (male), born ca. 1841.
5. Jos. Sparks (male), born ca. 1843.
6. Andrew Sparks, born ca. 1846.
7. Dennis Sparks, born ca. 1847.
8. Nancy Sparks, born ca. March, 1850.

From earlier census records, it would appear that Uriah Sparks had at least four children by his first wife. There was a George W. Sparks, age 28, living near Uriah Sparks in 1850, with wife named Martha, age 24, and children named Green Sparks, born ca. 1843; Augustus Sparks, born ca. 1845; Georgia Sparks, born ca. 1847; and John Sparks, born ca. April, 1850. This George W. Sparks may have been a son of Uriah; living with his family was a William Sparks, aged 24, who may also have been a son of Uriah.)

WALTER C. SPARKS, of New York City, born ca. 1791. Bounty Land Warrant File No. 84 926-120-55. Pension File SC 11 343.

On January 29, 1851, Walter C. Sparks, a resident of New York City, appeared before a notary public named Nicholas Haight to make application for bounty land under the Congressional act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 59 years old and that he had been a sergeant in a company commanded by Capt. Sampson and Capt. Livingston in a regiment of New York infantry commanded by Lt. Col. Jasper Ward in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered in the city of New York on or about September 2, 1814, for the term of 3 months and had been honorably discharged in New York City on December 2, 1814. He stated that he had not been given a written discharge. He signed his application as "Walter C. Sparks."

Records in the Treasury Department supported his claim and Walter C. Sparks was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On June 27, 1855, Walter C. Sparks appeared before a notary public named Lewis W. Ryckman to apply for additional bounty land under the new act of March 3, 1855. He stated he was now 63 years old and still a resident of New York City. He gave the same information regarding his service as he had in 1850 and again signed his application as "'Walter C. Sparks." Henry Raymond and Morris Lewis, both residents of New York City, signed as witnesses. He was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

On May 29, 1871, Walter C. Sparks made application for a pension under provisions of the Congressional act of February 14, 1871. He gave his age as 79 years and stated, as he had in 1851 and 1855, that he had served for 3 months in a New York Regiment. On this application, however, he added that he had also served in the U.S. Navy "as captain's clerk & midshipman on board the U.S. Brig Spark in the "Algerine War under command of Com. Stephen Decatur." He gave his address in New York as No. 150 Waverly Place. He stated that his wife, whose name he did not mention, had died October 13, 1868. He signed his application as "Walter C. Sparks." James V. Reich of 227 W. 13th St., and Alonzo R, Hampton of 60 West 12th St., signed as witnesses. A pension of $8.00 per month was authorized for Walter C. Sparks, but there is no record in his file of how long he lived to receive it.

(Editor's Note: We have no information on the branch of the family to which Walter C. Sparks belonged. He was listed on the 1840 census of New York City in Ward 4; his household consisted of himself, one female aged between 20 and 30, one female between 15 and 20, and one female aged under 5 years. According to the 1850 census~ there was a Walter C. Sparks, aged 45, born in New York, living in the 9th Ward in a family headed by Ellen Watson, aged 47, who was born in Ireland. If the age of this Walter C. Sparks was correctly given, he could not have been the one who served in the War of 1812. Mistakes were frequently made in ages on census records, however, and it is possible that this was the case here. This Walter C. Sparks, aged 47, was listed as a "Gentleman" with property valued at $6,000. Living with him was Mary Sparks, aged 42, and a Mary Sparks, aged 15; both were born in New York.)

32.1.8 WALTER SPARKS, of Henry County, Kentucky; died in Indiana in 1843; son 32.1.8.8 Isham Sparks. Bounty Land Rejected Warrant File 303 313-1855.

On January 15, 1851, William Sparks, a resident of Henry County, Kentucky, appeared before a justice of the peace named A. D. Johnson to make application for bounty land on behalf of Isham Sparks, aged 18, "a minor child & the only minor child of Walter Sparks, who died the 15th day of August 1843, leaving no widow now surving him." William Sparks stated that he was the guardian of Isham Sparks and that Isham's father, Walter Sparks, had been a soldier in the company commanded by Capt. Edward George "in the Regiment under Governor Shelby" in the War of 1812. He stated that it was his belief that Walter Sparks had volunteered as a mounted horseman at Newcastle, Henry County, Kentucky, in August and was discharged on November 20, but he was not sure of the year. William Sparks signed has name by mark.

Along with this application, William Sparks submitted a sworn statement, also dated January 15, 1851, which reads as follows, "State of Kentucky, Henry County. On this 15th day of January 1851 Personally appeared before me, A. D. Johnson, a justice of the peace within & for the County and State aforesaid, Robert Sparks and Richard Sparks, who being of good sound mind & disposing memory deposeth & saith that they was personally present and saw Walter Sparks die, he died in the State of Indiana in the County of Orange on the 5th day of August 1843; they also state that they saw him buried; they also state that no widow survives him and that Isharn Sparks is the only minor child of the said Walter Sparks." Robert Sparks and Richard Sparks both signed this statement by mark, It was witnessed by I. (or J.) Stone.

Also on January 15, 1851, William Sparks made a separate application for bounty land on the behalf of Isham Sparks based on another tour of service performed by Isham's father, Walter Sparks. Apparently, William Sparks believed that it was necessary to separate the two terms of service in this way. In this other application, William Sparks stated that Walter Sparks had served in a company commanded by Capt. Ziba Holt in the regiment commanded by Col, Presley Gray in the War of 1812; that he believed Walter Sparks was drafted in Henry County, Kentucky, on or about October 25, 1814, for a term of 6 months and was honorably discharged on May 25, 1815. William Sparks also signed this application by mark.

Records in the Treasury Department proved that Walter Sparks had served in Capt. E. George's company of Kentucky Militia from August 29, 1813, until November 2, 1813, and also in Capt. Holt's company from November 10, 1814, until May 10, 1815.

The office of the Secretary of the Interior, which handled bounty land cases, insisted upon having additional proof of Isham Sparks's being the son of Walter Sparks and that William Sparks was truly his guardian. On March 17, 1852, Robert Sparks swore before a justice of the peace named Lemuel B. Wenburn in Henry County that he was with Walter Sparks "during his sickness & waited on him until he died, he further states that he on the next day after his death saw him buried." He also stated that Isham Sparks "was nineteen years old sometime in the month of December 1851" but that he knew of no record giving the exact date of Isham's birth. Robert Sparks signed this statement by mark.

Also on March 17, 1852, Elisha Pruit signed a statement swearing that he was 'well acquainted with Isham Sparks "ever since he was born and believes him to be only nineteen years of age in Dec, l851." He also stated "that he was present in person when Susan Sparks died and was buried and that she died in the state of Indiana, in the month of April, 1843; he further states that Susan Sparks who died as aforesaid was the mother of Isham Sparks." He further stated that he had "lived a near neighbor to Walter Sparks up to his death & has continued so to live near his wife until she died and also lives near his children now." Elisha Pruit signed this statement by mark.

Also on March 17, 1852, William Sparks made another sworn statement, stating that he could not find a record of the age of Isham Sparks, but he was positive that he was nineteen years old sometime in December 1851. He added that he could not find a written discharge among Walter Sparks's papers. He again signed by mark.

On March 30, 1852, the Henry County clerk, E. P. Thomas, copied the following from the County Court's records: "December Term 1850, Isham Sparks who is over fourteen years old (and orphan of Walter Sparks who is dead, said Walter having served in the War of 1812) came into Court and chose William Sparks his guardian and said Sparks thereupon entered into and acknowledged bond in the penalty of fifty dollars conditional on no security being required."

This bounty land application was finally approved and Isham Sparks was issued Warrant No. 35,326 for 80 acres of bounty land on April 23, 1852.

On March 3, 1855, Congress passed a new act that provided that soldiers of the War of 1812, their widows and minor orphans were entitled to a total of 160 acres of bounty land. On October 4, 1859, Isham Sparks applied for the additional 80 acres to which he believed he was entitled. He was now a resident of Oldham County, Kentucky, and gave his age as 24 years and 10 months. He swore that he was the son of Walter Sparks and referred to having received 80 acres of bounty land in 1852. He stated that "there is a family register of his birth, that he was born the 22d day of November 1834" and was thus under the age of 21 years when the new act was passed by Congress on March 3, 1855. He signed his name to this application as "Isham Sparks." A. J, Fendley and I. I. (or J. J.) Berry, both residents of Oldham County, signed as witnesses.

Isham Sparks also submitted a sworn statement by his lawyer named J. W. Clayton that he had examined the family Bible that had belonged to Walter Sparks and found Isham's birth recorded as November 22, 1834.

When William Sparks had applied for bounty land on Isham's behalf in 1851, he had stated then that Isham's date of birth was not recorded anywhere, but that he was 19 years old in December 1851. by that calculation, Isham would have been born in 1832 and would not have been eligible for additional land under the act of 1855. The Commissioner of Pensions, therefore, requested that the family Bible be sent to Washington so that the entry regarding Isham's birth could be examined. This Isham Sparks refused to do for fear the Bible would be lost.

The Commissioner of Pensions also asked for proof that Walter Sparks's widow was dead. J. W. Clayton, Isham's lawyer, writing from La Grange, Kentucky, on November 30, 1859, stated that "as luck would have it, I met with a man in town yesterday whose wife is niece to Walter Sparks' wife, whose evidence I took." This man's name was Jonathan Stows (or Storm), a resident of Oldham County, aged 42 years. He swore that he had been well acquainted with Isham Sparks since childhood and that he was a son of Walter Sparks; he could not remember his mother's name for sure, but thought It was Sukey (nickname, apparently, for Susan). He remembered that she outlived her husband, but they had both died in Indiana many years earlier.

On February 15, 1860, J. W. Clayton again submitted a sworn statement, also signed by George L Ray, that a Bible containing the births of the children of Walter Sparks had been examined and that one entry under the heading "Births" read "Isum Sparks, November 22, 1834." He called attention to the spelling (Isum for Isham), but swore it was the same person.

The last document in this voluminous file is an undated letter, probably written about 1862, by J. W. Clayton, Isham's lawyer. He protested the fact that Isham's claim had been rejected because the Commissioner of Pensions insisted that Isham Sparks had been born prior to 1834. Clayton stated: "The Bible in which his age and those of a large family of his brothers & sisters are recorded, is an old book, one which from appearance had been in his father's family from the birth of their first child." Unfortunately, however, he did not copy any of the other births that he said were listed. He stated: "It would be impossible for me, were I so disposed, now to furnish the record if required as Sparks has removed to a distant part of this state and has taken the record with him, and if be loses his warrant, he also loses the small fee I charged him for my services, as he paid me that before he left." The Commissioner did not reconsider, and the claim was finally rejected.

(Editor's Note: Readers interested in this family will find the records of Sparks marriages in Henry County, Kentucky, to be of interest (see page 763 of the September , 1963 Quarterly, Vol. XI, No, 3, Whole No. 43.) The Walter Sparks who married Susan Prewitt (or Pruit) on February 8, 1814, was undoubtedly the father of Isham Sparks. Likewise, the Isham Sparks who married Sarah Prewitt (or Pruit) on July 11, 1854, was the same Isham Sparks who was a son of Walter Sparks.

Isham Sparks was listed on the 1860 census of Oldham County, Kentucky--his age was given as 35 and he was designated a "laborer" with $50 worth of real estate. His wife, Sarah, was listed as 22. years old; both were born in Kentucky. Living with them were Georgianna Sparks, age 5, and Mary Sparks, age 3 months; both were born in Kentucky and were probably Isham's children.)

WESLEY SPARKS, of Parke County, Indiana; born ca. 1790. Bounty Land Warrant File 54 846-20-55.

On April 19, 1851, Wesley Sparks, a resident of Parke County, Indiana, appeared before a justice of the peace named Samuel Laverty to make application for bounty land under the provisions of the Congressional act of September 28, 1850. He stated that he was 61 years old and that he was the identical "Westley Sparks" who had been a private in Capt. Jacob Zenor's company in the 5th Indiana Regiment of Militia commanded by Col. Tipton in the War of 1812. He stated that he had volunteered at Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana, on October 20, 1812, for one month and that he was discharged at Harrison County on November 19, 1812. He also served as a private in the company commanded by Capt. John Huse (?) in the 5th Regiment of Indiana Militia, commanded by Col, Tipton; he volunteered for this tour of duty at Harrison County on or about March 5, 1813, for one month and he stated that he was discharged on or about April 5, 1813, He signed his name as "Wesley Sparks."

With his application, Wesley Sparks submitted the following document: "I do certify that Westley Sparks, of the fifth Indiana Regiment, Harrison County, as a good and faithful Solder has sarved a Tower of Duty under my Command Commencing on the 20th of October 1812 Ending on the 19th of November 1812. [signed] Jacob Zenor, Captain."

Treasury Department records proved that Wesley Sparks had served under Capt. Zenor from October 20, 1812, to November 18, 1812, and under Capt. Hughes from March 12, 1813, to April 16, 1813. He was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land.

On May 22, 1855, Wesley Sparks made application for additional bounty land under the new act. He was still a resident of Parke County, Indiana, and gave his age as 65 years. He gave no additional information regarding himself. He signed the application as "Wesley Sparks." Wesley Strain and Hargus M. Stone, both residents of Parke County, signed as witnesses. Wesley Sparks appointed William H. Nye of Parke County as his lawful attorney. Wesley Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: From Wesley Sparks's applications, it would appear that he was a resident of Harrison County, Indiana, at the time of the War of 1812. by 1830, however, he was living in Parke County, Indiana, for he was listed on the 1830 census in that county. From the enumeration of his household at that time, it would appear that he was married and had six children (three males and three females) under the age of fifteen. One other Sparks was listed on the 1830 census of Parke County--he was Adison Sparks, slightly younger, apparently, than Wesley. When the 1850 census of Parke County was searched for us some years ago, Wesley Sparks was not found, For the Sparks families that were found in the 1850 census of Parke County, see page 468 of the March, 1960, issue of the Quarterly (Vol. VIII, No. 1, Whole No, 29).)

Abstracts of the applications for bounty land and pensions made by Sparkses who served in the War of 1812 will be continued in the next issue of the Quarterly.


Pages 908-911
Whole Number 50

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS
(Continued from page 847)

11.2.2 WILLIAM SPARKS, of Bourbon County, Kentucky, born at least as early as 1792 (ca. 1787); died in Bourbon County, Ky., in 1849; married Elizabeth Barton in Bourbon County in 1826 (this was his second marriage); Elizabeth, his widow, was living in Marion County, Missouri, in 1855; she later lived in Saline County, Missouri. Land Warrant File 68-919-160-55; Widow's Pension Application File 27,711.

In June, 1855 (exact day not stated) Mrs. Elizabeth Sparks, aged 48 years, appeared before a justice of the peace named Henry W. Holingsworth in Marion County, Missouri, to make application for bounty land under the act passed by Congress on March 3, 1855. She stated that she was a widow of William Sparks who had been a wagoner in the War of 1812 under Wagon Master William Johnson (later found to be Capt. William Garrard) in a regiment of Kentucky Volunteers. She stated that William Sparks had volunteered in Bourbon County, Kentucky, near the end of August, 1812 for a term of 6 months and that he had been honorably discharged. She stated that she and William Sparks had been married on December 25, 1826, by the Rev. G. Gates and that her name before her marriage had been Elizabeth Barton. She also stated that William Sparks had died in Bourbon County, Kentucky, on August 25, 1849, and that she was his widow. She signed her name in a clear hand as "Elizabeth Sparks." Samuel M. Stone and Thomas H. Garrard signed as witnesses.

With her application, Elizabeth Sparks submitted a sworn statement made by Joseph Shawhorn (spelling uncertain) and William Barton, both residents of Bourbon County, Kentucky, that had been made on June 8, 1855. Both swore that they had served in the War of 1812. Shavvhorn stated he had been a wagoner under Wagon Master Robert Houston in a regiment of Kentucky volunteers commanded by Col. Lewis, while Barton swore he had been a sergeant in the company of Capt. Garrard in a regiment of cavalry commanded by Col. Ball. They both swore that they had been intimately acquainted with William Sparks and that he had served as his widow claimed in the War of 1812.

Treasury Department records later revealed that William Sparks had served as a wagoner from September 6, 1812, to November 9, 1812, when he was discharged, and that he had furnished his own team and wagon; that he had travelled some 192 miles--he had been allowed 13 days to return home after his discharge and had been paid for a total. of 78 days of service; his compensation had been $255.00. (The fact that he had been paid for his services would later prevent his widow from receiving a pension, but did not prevent her from receiving bounty land.)

Apparently more detailed information regarding William Sparks's service was requested, and on May 12, 1857, William Barton prepared a more informative statement. He swore that he was a resident of Bourbon County, Kentucky, and that he had been an "orderly sergeant in the Troop of Cavalry commanded by Capt. Garrard and attached to Col. Ball' s squadron of Kentucky Volunteers ." He stated: "I saw William Sparks in the service of the United States, engaged as a teamster. I met him driving his team on the road between St. Mary's and Fort Defiance in the State of Ohio. He was under the command of William Markham or William Johnson, Wagon Masters, or Davis Carnear, Quarter Master, I can't say which, I know ... that he resided in Bourbon County, Kentucky, at the time. We often talked the matter of our trip over after the war but it has been many years since, and I cannot give the name of the paymaster who paid him. I know he has been dead for a number of years ." He added that he also knew that Elizabeth Sparks was his widow. Although he did not indicated that he was related to Elizabeth Sparks, it seems likely that he was her brother, since her maiden name had been Elizabeth Barton.

Joseph Shawhorn (spelling uncertain) also prepared a sworn statement on this matter on May 14, 1857. He swore that he also had been a teamster and that he had seen William Sparks in the same service.

Elizabeth Sparks's application was finally approved and she was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

On May 5, 1878, Elizabeth Sparks applied for a pension on the basis of her husband's service in the War of 1812. She was then a resident of Arrow Rook, Saline County, Missouri, and was 73 years old. Because she provided very little information regarding her husband's service, her application was returned. She applied again on October 20, 1881, and submitted a sworn statement from the Bourbon County, Kentucky, county clerk regarding her marriage. He stated that "William Sparks & Eliza Barton were joined in marriage by G. Gates, a minister of the Gospel on the 21st day of September , 1826, as appears from the marriage records in my office." She added that her marriage had been performed near the town of Paris, Kentucky.

On February 10, 1879, Mrs. Talitha Scott of Fayette County, Kentucky, aged 72 years, swore that she had been acquainted with Elizabeth Sparks for 40 years and likewise had known William Sparks and that they had lived together as husband and wife.

The application of Elizabeth Sparks for a pension was finally rejected because her husband had been paid for his service as wagoner and had never really enlisted as a soldier. On December 18, 1889, a lawyer named F. C. Nesbit attempted to reactivate her application, stating that she was "very poor and 83 years old." However, he was not successful. We have no record of the date of her death.

(Editor's Note: A brief record of the settlement of the estate of William Sparks has been found in the Bourbon County, Kentucky, Court records. As stated by his widow, he died August 25, 1849. On September 3, 1849, the administration of his estate was granted to William Barton, who was doubtlessly the same William Barton who provided Elizabeth with sworn statements regarding her husband's service. He was probably Elizabeth's brother. Hiram Sparks signed as bondsman for William Barton. (See Bourbon County Order Book 0, p. 144) On November 5, 1849, a sale was held to dispose of the personal property of William Sparks in Bourbon County. Unfortunately, these records make no mention of the family of William Sparks, although Hiram Sparks and Lloyd Sparks were mentioned in connection with the sale of his property. This Hiram Sparks was probably the same Hiram Sparks who was listed on the 1850 census of Bourbon County as 28 years of age and living by himself. Possibly he was a son of William Sparks by an earlier marriage. A Lloyd Sparks was listed on the same census, aged 23, living with the family of Benjamin and Mary Rogers. He may have been a son of William and Elizabeth. Elizabeth Sparks, widow of William, was also listed on the 1850 census of Bourbon County with her family, as follows (all born in Kentucky):

11.2.2.1 Elizabeth Sparks, aged 43 (thus born ca. 1807)
11.2.2.2 John T. Sparks, 18 ( born ca. 1832)
11.2.2.3 Charlotte Sparks, 16 ( born ca. 1834)
11.2.2.4 Sarah Sparks, 14 ( born ca. 1836)
11.2.2.5 James Sparks, 12 ( born ca. 1838)
11.2.2.6 Sophia Sparks, 9 ( born ca. 1841)
11.2.2.7 Victoria Sparks, 7 ( born ca. 1843)
11.2.2.8 Mary Sparks, 4 ( born ca. 1846)

1.2.1.2.2.3 WILLIAM SPARKS, born May 1, 1782, in Wilkes County, North Carolina; died December 25, 1857, in Franklin County, Alabama. Bounty Land Warrant File 41 652-80- 55.

On November 30, 1850, William Sparks, aged 68 years and a resident of Franklin County, Alabama, appeared before a justice of the peace named E. C. Harris to make application for bounty land. He swore that he was the identical William Sparks who had been a private in Captain Manly Ford's company in a regiment commanded by Col. Hugh Means, in the War of 1812. He stated that he had been drafted at Spartanburg District in South Carolina about October 1, 1814, for the term of 6 months, but that he served only 5 months and 20 days and was honorably discharged at Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 12, 1815. He signed his application in a clear hand as "Wm. Sparks."

With his application, William Sparks submitted his hand-written discharge which reads as follows: "Orangeburg, March the 12th, 1815. This is to Certify that Wm Sparks, a private in my Company of So. Car. Militia in the U. States Service has faithfully and honorably served his Country five Months & twenty days is by order of Majr. Wm Fields honorably Discharged from the service. [signed] Manley Ford, Capt."

The application of William Sparks was approved and he was issued a warrant for 80 acres of bounty land.

On August 25, 1855, William Sparks, still a resident of Franklin County, Alabama, appeared before a justice of the peace named James H. Trimble to make application for additional bounty land under the new law of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was now 74 years old, and that he had previously received a warrant for 80 acres which he had "located in this county." Again he signed his name as "Wm. Sparks." Tandy Russell and A. A. Hughes, both residents of Franklin County, signed as witnesses. William Sparks received a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land as a result of this application.

(Editor's Note: William Sparks was a brother of Enoch Sparks, whose applications for bounty land were abstracted in the Quarterly of September, 1960 (Vol. VIII, No, 3, Whole No. 31) pp. 502-03. They were sons of John and Mary (Parmely) Sparks and were grandsons of Matthew and Sarah Sparks (see the Quarterly of June, 1961, Vol. IX, No. 2, Whole No, 34) pp. 556-66.) William Sparks was born May 1, 1782, in Wilkes County, North Carolina, and died December 25, 1857, according to his tombstone in the Sparks Cemetery west of Russellville, Franklin County, Alabama. As a young man he moved from Wilkes County, North Carolina, to Spartanburg District, South Carolina, and in 1820 moved with his family to Franklin County, Alabama. His wife's maiden name was Eunice Woodruff who was born August 25, 1786, and died September 25, 1842. They were the parents of the following children:

(1) John Sparks.
(2) Polly Sparks (probably nickname for Mary).
(3) Riley Sparks, born in Spartanburg County, S.C., October 22, 1811, died near Frankfort, Ala., on December 29, 1892. He married, first, Nancy Benson on December 20, 1832; she was born in White County, Tenn., January 15, 1815. She died January 12, 1857, and Riley married, second, Nancy Malone, born in the early 1830's (note: this is a correction), There were no children by the second marriage. by his first wife, Riley Sparks had the following children:

William Benson Sparks;
Mary Jane Sparks;
Daniel Rainy Sparks;
John Adams Sparks;
James Madison Sparks;
Martha Ann Sparks;
Christopher Columbus Sparks;
Riley Franklin Sparks;
Lemuel Nelson Sparks; and
Nancy Virginia Sparks.

(4) Rebecca Sparks.
(5) Artainesa Sparks.
(6) Willis Sparks, born in S.C. about 1815; married Martha and by 1850 had a son named Marion Sparks.
(7) Anna Sparks.
(8) Saleta Sparks.
(9) Jerry Sparks.
(10) Elisha Sparks.
(11) Elijah Sparks.
(12) Elivra Sparks.
(13) Permelia Sparks.
(14) William Sparks, born ca. 1830.


Pages 928-933
Whole Number 51

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

WILLIAM SPARKS, born ca. 1794 in Kentucky; volunteered in Bourbon County, Ky.; married Cordelia Donavan in Fleming County, Ky., in 1815; died in Andrew County, Missouri, between 1856 and 1860; Land Warranty File 45 800-80-55.

On October 24, 1850, William Sparks of Lewis County, Kentucky, appeared before a justice of the peace named Stephen Bliss to make application for bounty land under the provisions of the Congressional Act of September 28, 1850. William Sparks stated that he was 62 years old and that he had been drafted as a private into the company commanded by Capt. Henry Ellis in the 16th Regiment of Kentucky Militia commanded by Col. Porter. He stated that he had 'volunteered at Millersburg in Bourbon County in the state of Kentucky on or about the 10th day of September , 1814, to serve for the period of six months and continued in actual service for the term of six months and was honorably discharged at Fort Malden [Canada] on the 10th day of March 1815.' He added that 'he procured certificate of his discharge which was destroyed by fire at the burning of his Mother's house in Nicholas County in the State of Kentucky about the year 1826.' William Sparks signed his application for bounty land by mark.

Records in the Treasury Department proved that William Sparks had served as he had claimed and a warrant was issued him for 80 acres of bounty land.

On March 7, 1856, William Sparks made application for additional bounty land under the new Act of March 3, 1855. He made this application before a justice of the peace named Daniel Van Buskirk in Andrew County, Missouri. He again gave his age as 62 years, although six years earlier he had also given it as 62. From census record data it appears that he was more nearly correct in 1856 and that he was born ca. 1794. In his 1856 application, he gave the same information regarding his service as he had in 1850. However, he stated that his certificate of discharge had been destroyed by fire in 1822 instead of 'about ... 1826' as he had stated in 1850. He again signed by mark. Under the Act of 1856, two witnesses were required, and James H. Sparks and William Stephens, both residents of Andrew County, Missouri, signed as witnesses. (There can be little doubt but that James H. Sparks was a son of William Sparks.) This application was also approved and William Sparks was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: The fact that William Sparks volunteered for service in Bourbon County means that he probably was living in or near Bourbon County in 1814. We know that there were Sparks families in Bourbon County as early as 1786. It is also interesting to note that William Sparks stated that his written discharge had been burned in his mother's house in Nicholas County sometime in the 1820's. Nicholas County adjoins Bourbon County on the north-east.

From census records we know that this William Sparks was the same William Sparks who married Cordelia Donavan in Fleming County, Kentucky, in 1815. (The marriage bond, probably signed a day or two before the actual marriage, was dated August 8, 1815, just five months after he had been discharged from the Army.) Fleming County adjoins Nicholas County on the east and adjoins Lewis County on the southwest.

by 1850, William Sparks had moved to Lewis County, Kentucky. He was listed on the 1850 census as being 56 years of age whereas in his application for bounty land the same year he stated that be was 62 years old. It is probable that the census record is more nearly correct and that he was born ca. 1794. His birth place, according to the 1850 census, was Kentucky. His wife, Cordelia (Donavan) Sparks, was listed in 1850 as 56 years of age, so she was born ca. 1794 also. Her birth place was given as Kentucky. Living with William and Cordelia Sparks in 1850 was Edward F. Sparks, aged 21, and his wife, Sally, with their infant daughter, Malbora. Edward was their son. There was also a Moses Evans, aged 5, living with William and Cordelia in 1850--he may have been a grandchild.

There were eleven different Sparks families living in Lewis County, Kentucky, in 1850. How many of them were closely related to William Sparks is not known. (See the Quarterly of September , 1957, Vol. V, No. 3, pp. 233-34, Whole No. 19, for the Sparks families on this census.) From subsequent records, we can be sure that the James H. Sparks and the William A. Sparks living near William Sparks were his sons.

by 1856, William Sparks had moved from Lewis County, Kentucky, to Andrew County, Missouri, for he was a resident of Andrew County when he made his second application for bounty land on March 7, 1856. Apparently he had died by 1860, for according to the census of Andrew County for 1860, his wife, Cordelia, now aged 65 years, was living with their son, Edward F. Sparks, who had also moved to Andrew County.

It appears that two sons of William Sparks accompanied him to Missouri, Edward F. and James H. The latter signed as a witness to his father's bounty land application in 1856.

Edward F. Sparks, son of William and Cordelia Sparks, was born ca. 1829. In 1849 (Lewis County, Ky., marriage bond dated January 6, 1849) he married Sally Criswell, who was born in Kentucky about 1825. When the 1850 census was taken of Lewis County, Edward and Sally were living with William and Cordelia Sparks--they had a six-month-old daughter named Melbora. Apparently Sally, wife of Edward, died for in 1860 Edward's wife was listed as Mary M. Sparks. Living with Edward F. and Mary M. Sparks in 1860 was a Julia Sparks, aged 13, and a Cornelia Sparks, aged 11. These girls could not have been Edward's children and all evidence points to their being Edward's nieces, children of his brother, William A. Sparks. William A. Sparks, son of William and Cordelia (Donavan) Sparks, had been married to Mary Meenach in Lewis County in 1847 (marriage bond dated January 8, 1847--she was called Polly on the bond and her father's name was given as Alexander Meenach.) On the 1850 census of Lewis County, William A. and Mary (Meenach) Sparks had been listed with Julia A. Sparks, aged 3, and Cordelia Sparks, aged 1 year. This Cordelia Sparks, born 1849, died in Andrew County, Missouri, in May, 1879. She was the second wife of Capt. Samuel Blair Stafford (born May 3, 1833, in Carroll County, Tennessee, and died May 11, 1906, in Holt County, Missouri); they were married in 1869 and were the parents of five children: (1) William Marion Stafford, born January 1870; (2) Thomas Mahlon Stafford, born ca. 1872; (3) Emma Jane Stafford, born August 8, 1873; (4) Elsie Stafford, born 1875 or 1876; and (5) John S. Stafford, born July 11, 1877.

Also living with Edward and Mary Sparks in 1860 was 15-year-old Moses Evans, who had been living with William and Cordelia Sparks in 1850, then aged 5 years. The 'Millon Sparks' aged 10, living with Edward and Mary Sparks in 1860 was surely the Mellora Sparks of 1850, daughter of Edward's first wife. From census records, Edward Sparks appears to have bad the following children, but which wife was the mother of each cannot be determined with available data.

Children of Edward F. Sparks:
(1) Mellora (or Millon) Sparks, born 1850 in Kentucky.
(2) Elizabeth Sparks, born ca. 1851 in Kentucky.
(3) Phebe S parks, born ca. 1853 in Missouri.
(4) Catherine Sparks, born ca. 1856 in Missouri.
(5) Minerva Sparks, born ca. 1858 in Missouri.
(6) Martha J. Sparks, born ca. 1861 in Missouri.
(7) Anna M. Sparks, born ca. 1864 in Missouri.
(8) Charlotte M. Sparks, born ca. 1864 in Missouri.

An older daughter of Edward F. Sparks apparently married FNU Williams and died, for living with Edward and Mary Sparks in 1880 were three granddaughters (relationships were stated in the 1880 census) named (1) Henrietta Williams, born ca. 1872; (2) Virginia B. Williams, born ca. 1874; and (3) Martha E0 Williams, born ca. 1875.

James Harvey Sparks, son of William and Cordelia (Donavan) Sparks, was born in Kentucky about 1826. He was married in Lewis County, Kentucky, in 1848 to Phebe Davis, daughter of George Davis (marriage bond dated January 8, 1848). He and his wife were listed on the 1850 census with one child, Mary A. Sparks, aged one year. They apparently accompanied William and Cordelia to Missouri, for James H. Sparks was a witness to his father's application for bounty land in 1856. by 1860, according to the census of Andrew County, Missouri, James Harvey and Phebe (Davis) Sparks were the parents of the following children:

(1) Mary A. Sparks, born ca. 1849 in Kentucky.
(2) William Sparks, born ca. 1851 in Kentucky.
(3) Marie Sparks, born ca. 1854 in Missouri.
(4) Lucy Sparks, born ca. 1857 in Missouri.
(5) Alice Sparks, born in May, 1860, in Missouri.

WILLIAM SPARKS, born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, about 1793; died Monongalia County, Virginia (now West Virginia) on March 13, 1853; married Sarah Clouse in Monongalia County on November 29, 1821. Pension File OWI & Wid., Rej. 18062; also Pension File WC 9 172.

The earliest record pertaining to William Sparks's application for a pension is found in Report No, 147 of the U.S. House of Representatives, 30th Congress, 1st Session. On 25 Jan, 1848. Congressman W. T. Lawrence, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, made the following report:

The petition of William Sparks represents, that on the 3d of May, 1814, he enrolled for five years, and took the bounty under Lieutenant John R. Gay and Captain William Morris, 22d regiment, U.S. infantry, Hugh Bradley, colonel; marched to Pittsburgh, Erie, and Buffalo, and was with the army with which Brown, Scott, Gaines, and Ripley invaded Canada, July 3d, 1814. On the 4th, before day, Fort Erie was taken; fought in the battle of Chippewa, on the 5th; thence, after some marches, at the battle of Bridgewater; received a wound, by the kicking of his own musket, which broke his collar bone. He continued with the army until going into winter quarters, at Sackett's Harbor, where he remained until the end of his five years. During this time he was transferred, first, to Captain Foulk's company, then from the 22d to the 2d regiment, under Captain Abner P. Spencer, and last, under Captain Francis Bailey, until he was discharged. He received his bounty of 160 acres of land, leaving his discharge at the land office. He was an orderly sergeant more than the last four years. He is 57 years old; has three children, of fourteen months, nine years, and 11 years old, and a daughter married. He is now, and for four years has been, unable to labor, and is growing worse, from, as he believes, the wound named, and exposure during the service. He is penniless, and dependent on the labor of his wife and charity of friends. He is unable to prove the facts he states, because he does not know where any of his fellow soldiers are, nor has he ability or means to seek them. Accompanying his petition is Doctor Martin Carr's affidavit, of June 8, 1846, that he finds Sparks's collar bone with a fracture of many years' standing; also has a pulmonary affection, [sic] and is incapable of labor from rheumatism, added to the other infirmities; that he is destitute, and dependent on his wife's labor.

'G. R. C. Allen, of Morgantown, in a letter dated December 20, 1847, states, that Sparks has lived in that town many years, and sustains a good moral character, from his knowledge of which, and conversations with him relating to the war, &c., he has no doubt of the truth of the facts stated in his peititon.

'Edgar C. Wilson confirms the above statement, as to Sparks's character, which is also sustained by a certificate of 22 citizens of Morgantown. Charles M. Lane, M.D., and Watson Carr, M.D., by affidavit, confirm the statement of Martin Carr as regards his diseases and inability to labor.

'The committee are of opinion that there is no evidence to show that the disabilities complained of are occasioned by injuries sustained in the service of the United States, and therefore beg to be discharged from the further consideration of the petition.'

The House of Representatives 'laid this report upon the table' which meant that no further action was taken by Congress.

On June 3, 1851, T. S. Haymond, who had presented Sparks's petition to Congress earlier, made application to the Pension Office on his behalf. Haymond stated that William Sparks was in very bad health, 'cannot probably live one year, is very poor with a helpless family.' He closed his letter as follows: 'This man Sparks is considered so honest and upright by his neighbours that there is much interest felt by them for his success in this application.'

Along with his appeal for financial assistance, William Sparks submitted the written discharge which he had received in 1819. It reads as follows: 'Know ye, That William Sparks, a Sergeant of Captain James Bailey's Company (F), Second Regiment of Infantry who was enlisted the third day of May one thousand eight hundred and fourteen to serve Five Years is hereby Honorably Discharged from the Army of the United States. Said William Sparks was born in the county of Washington in the State of Pennsylvania, is twenty six years of age, Five feet ten ½ inches high, Light complexion, Brown eyes, Brown hair, and by occupation when enlisted a Farmer. Given at Sackets Harbor the Second day of May 1819.

[signed] H. Brady
Col. Comd. Post.'

In his declaration dated May 24, 1851, William Sparks gave essentially the same information regarding his service as had appeared in the House Report. He stated that he was 'in extreme poverty, not worth fifty dollars in the world and is dependent upon the charity of his neighbours and has been for some ten years for support.' He also stated that he had 'resided in Monongalia County (with the exception of some two years residence in Harrison County) Virginia [now West Virginia] ever since he returned from the army in 1819.' He signed this declaration as 'Wm. Sparks.'

Also on May 24, 1851, a group of Morgantown citizens signed a statement to the effect that they were well acquainted with William Sparks 'and from our knowledge of his integrity and upright deportment do not doubt that all he has stated in his declaration is true. We know of no man whose integrity is more reliable and his morals are unexceptionable.' The signers were: Guy R. C. Allen, Henry Dering, Rawley Holland, Thos, Meredith, Henry Daugherty, Edgar C. Wilson, George L Ray, John N. byrns, Js. Fitch, and R. L. Berkshire.

On May 27, 1851, Dr. Charles McLane and Dr. Wattson Carr, physicians of Morgantown, signed a declaration regarding William Sparks's disability. McLane stated he had known Sparks for about twenty-five years and Cerr had known him for about seven years.

No action was taken on behalf of William Sparks and he died March 13, 1853.

On January 14, 1858, William Sparks's widow, Sarah Sparks, applied for a pension on the basis of her husband's service. She recalled his service in the War of 1812, his ill health, and her own need. She stated that her maiden name had been Sarah Clouse. She made this application in Fayette County, Penna., but gave her residence as Monongalia, Va. She signed her application by mark.

With her application, Sarah Sparks submitted a sworn statement by the clerk of the Monongalia County Court 'that it appears from the Records of this office that William Sparks and Sarah Clouse were married on the 29th day of November 1821 by Joseph A. Shackleford, a Minister of the Gospel.'

On January 13, 1858, Charles Williams and Shadrack O'Brien, both of Fayette County, Penna., swore before a justice of the peace in Fayette County that they had served in the 22d Regiment in which William Sparks was a sergeant. They swore that 'he received a wound in the breaking of the right Collar Bone' during the 'Battle of Bridgewater caused by the bursting or kick of a musket--that after receiving said wound he was removed to the Hospital situated on the 4 mile Creek, State of New York--at which place said William Sparks remained in this disabled state under the care of Dr. Hull for some two or three months.' The witnesses to this sworn statement were Jonathan D. Springer, J .P., and Daniel Downer.

On February 23, 1858, Dr. Wattson Carr again prepared a sworn statement regarding William Sparks's poor health during the last ten years of his life, Dr. Carr was now [l858] 'a practicing physician in the City of Chicago.' On January 16, 1858, Dr. Charles McLane and Joseph A. Wheeler of Monongalia County, Virginia, made a similar statement.

Nothing came of this application because the Congressional bill which might have provided a pension for widows of soldiers of the War of 1812 failed to pass. Finally in the year 1878 such an act was passed and on 1 April 1878, Sarah Sparks again applied for a pension. She added no new information, except to note that her husband had not been married previously to his marriage to her and that she herself was now 74 years old. James Shay, aged 77, and Mahala A. Widows, aged 64, signed as witnesses to her application, Shay stating he had known her for 61 years and Mrs. Widows stating she had known her for 50 years.

On September 25, 1878, Sarah Sparks's application was approved and she was granted a pension of $8.00 per month.

There are a number of documents in this file pertaining to Sarah Sparks's death, which occurred on January 13, 1887, at the residence of her daughter, in Morgantown. The daughter, Margaret, was the wife of John H. Smith; she gave her age as 52 in 1887.

(Editor's note: This William Sparks was doubtlessly connected with the Sparks family of Washington County, Penna., featured in the Quarterly of June 1963 (Vol. XI, No. 2), Whole No. 42.)

Abstracts of the applications for bounty land and pensions made by Sparkses who served in the War of 1812 will be continued in the next issue of the Quarterly.


Pages 950-953
Whole Number 52

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

WILLIAM SPARKS, born ca. 1791 in Maryland; resident of Hamilton County, Ohio, in 1819 where he married on October 14, 1819, Jane Wiggins; moved to Ripley, Brown County, Ohio, in 1820 where he died November 22, 1876. Pension File WC 15 462.

On March 15, 1871, William Sparks appeared before the Judge of Probate, Samuel H. Stevenson, of Brown County, Ohio, to make application for a pension under the provisions of the Act of February 14, 1871, based on his service in the War of 1812. William Sparks swore that he was 80 years of age and a resident of the town of Ripley in Brown County, Ohio. He stated that the maiden name of his wife had been Jane Avon Smith Wiggins and that they had been married at Cincinnati, Ohio, in Dec, 1819. He stated that he had enlisted as a private in Capt. Bumbery's Company of Sea Fercibles stationed at Fort Molienry near Baltimore, Maryland, commanded by Maj. Armstrad in 1814 and was discharged in 1815. He could not recall the exact dates but swore that he had enlisted for one year and had served out his full time. He stated that he had been in the fight with the British in the spring of 1815 when they attempted to capture Baltimore with war vessels. "They did not succeed, but after a long bombardment they left in disgust." He appointed Chambers Baird of Ripley to be his lawful attorney to prosecute his claim. He stated that his domicile or place of abode was "in Ripley, Brown County, Ohio, on Second Street between Market and Medburg Steets on the west side of the street at the corner of Second Street & Campbell's Alley." William Sparks signed this application by mark. Alonzo B. Palmer and David Tarbell were his witnesses.

When Chambers Baird submitted this application to the Commissioner of Pensions on March 16, 1871, he stated that William Sparks had obtained a land warrant "some years ago," but the papers pertaining to that grant have not been located at the National Aràhives. The warrant number was 3173-160-50.

Treasury Department records revealed that William Sparks had served in Capt. Gill's Company, U.S. Sea Fencibles, from February 21, 1813, to August 31, 1814; and that he had been transferred to Capt. M. S. Rumberry's Company on March 23, 1814. His pension application was approved on December 26, 1871, and he was granted a pension of $8.00 per month from February 14, 1871.

William Sparks died November 22, 1876. On May 20, 1878, Jane Sparks, widow of William, appeared before Judge John P. Biehn to make application for a pension under the provisions of an Act of Congress dated March 9, 1878. She stated that she was 78 years of age end that she was a resident of Ripley, Brown County, Ohio. She swore that she had been married to William Sparks on October 14, 1819, by one James Quinn, Minister of the Gospel, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and that her maiden name had been Jane Wiggins. She also stated neither she nor William Sparks had been previously married, She also stated that she and her hunsband "have resided in Ripley, Brown County, Ohio, ever since about three months after their marriage, removing from Hamilton County, Ohio." Jane Sparks signed by mark; her witnesses were Marion Johnson, aged 68, and David Gaddis, aged 72, both of Ripley. Marion Johnson stated he had known Jane Sparks for 46 years and David Gaddis stated he had known her for 48 years.

To prove her marriage to William Sparks, Jane Sparks submitted a sworn statement by the Probate Judge of Hamilton County, Ohio, that a record was on file of the marriage of William Sparks and Jane Wiggins dated October 14, 1819, signed by James Quinn, a Minister of the Gospel.

Marion Johnson also submitted a sworn statement dated May 20, 1878, that he had resided in Ripley since 1832 and that he had known Jane Sparks since that time. He swore that he was present when William Sparks died November 22, 1876, that he had "helped lay out the corpse and attended his funeral at Ripley." On the same date, David Gaddis swore that he had lived in Ripley since 1820 and had known the Sparkses since 1830, that he had attended William Sparks's funeral, "being present & officiating as one of the Ministers of the Gospel on the occasion."

On December 19, 1878, Chambers Baird wrote to the Commissioner of Pensions to ask about Jane Sparks's application, stating that she "has no means of support except a mere pittance."

Jane Sparks's application was approved on January 2, 1879, and she was granted a pension of $8.00 per month from March 9, 1878.

(Editor's Note: From census records we know that William Sparks was born in Maryland about 1791. He served in a Maryland unit in the War of 1812 and from the fact that this unit was stationed near Baltimore when he enlisted on February 21, 1813, we may speculate that his home was near Baltimore. Sometime between 1814 and 1819, he moved from Maryland to Hamilton County, Ohio, where he married Jane Wiggins on October 14, 1819. In the June, 1962, issue of the Quarterly (Vol. X, No. 2, Whole No. 38,p. 657- 8) we published the will of Isaac Sparks who died in Hamilton County, Ohio, in l834. In his will, Isaac Sparks mentioned his eldest son named William Sparks. (Cemetery records reveal that Isaac Sparks was born November 24, 1768, and died August 31, 1834, while his wife Sally died December 17, 1825.) William Sparks, son of Isaac, may have been the same William Sparks who married Jane Wiggins, however, while this William Sparks was born in Maryland, a daughter of Isaac Sparks (Mary who married Obadiah Seward) gave her birth place on the 1850 census as New Jersey. This latter record argues against the two Williams being the same person.

When the 1850 census was taken of Brown County, Ohio, William Sparks was listed as a cabinet maker, with real estate valued at $2200 and birth place as Maryland; his wife Jane was listed as 44 years old and born in Pennsylvania. A 7-year-old girl named Hester Ann was listed also, born in Ohio--she was probably a daughter. In 1870, William and Jane Sparks were listed in the household of Alonzo Palmer, aged 30, a carpenter. Two Palmer children were listed: Luella aged 9 years and William L. Palmer aged 7 years. On the 1880 census, Jane Sparks, now a widow aged 80, was listed as living with George Gabler (aged 23, a photographer) with his wife, named Louella, aged 19 years. George Gabler was called Jane Sparks's grandson on this record, It appears, therefore, that Hester Ann Sparks, daughter of William and Jane Sparks, married Alonzo Palmer and died prior to 1870, and that Louella, daughter of Alonzo and Hester Ann (Sparks) Palmer, married George Gabler.)

1.2.1.2.1.2.7 WILLIAM D. SPARKS, born in Surry County, North Carolina, about 1790; died in - - - - - - -, Cooper County, Missouri, prior to 1860. Bounty Land Warrant File 54 795-120-55.

On November 21, 1850, William Sparks, a resident of Cooper County, Missouri, appeared before a justice of the peace named Thomas M. Campbell in Cooper County to make application for bounty land. William Sparks stated that he was 52 years old, but from other records, including his own later application, we know that he was actually 62 years old in 1850. He swore that he had served as a private in Capt. John Witcher's Company of the 5th North Carolina Regiment of detached infantry commanded by Lt. Col, Sam Hunter in the War of 1812. He swore that he had been drafted in Surry County, North Carolina, on or about July 15, 1814, for the term of six months and that he had continued in such service until he was honorably discharged at Norfolk, Virginia, on February 22, 1815. He added that it had not been until November 28, 1814, that he had been ordered to active duty. He signed his name to the application as "William Sparks."

With his application, William Sparks sent his certificate of discharge which reads: "In conformity to General Orders received the 22d of February 1815, William Sparks, a Private in Captain John Witcher's Company of the 5th North Carolina Regiment, in the Service of the United States, at Norfolk, is hereby honorably discharged from his tour of duty, he was detached to perform, under General Orders of the 28th Nov, 1814. [signed] John Witcher, Captain 5th Regiment, North Carolina Militia [signed] Sam Hunter, Lt. Col."

His application was approved and William Sparks was issued a bounty land warrant for 40 acres.

On April 14, 1855, William Sparks appeared before Henry C. Lewis, Clerk of the County Court of Cooper County to make application for additional bounty land under the new Act of March 3, 1855. He stated that he was now 65 years old and still a resident of Cooper County. He gave the same information about his service as he had in 1850 except he gave the regimental commander's name as Col. Atkinson instead of Hunter. Apparently Atkinson commanded the regiment from which he had been detached. He again signed his name in a clear hand as "William Sparks." Two men named Michael Son and Joseph H. Moore signed his application as witnesses. Again his application was approved and William Sparks was issued a warrant for 120 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note:1.2.1.2.1.2.7 William D. Sparks was born ca. 1790 in Surry County, North Carolina. He was a son of 1.2.1.2.1.2 Matthew and Eunice Sparks and a great-grandson (relationship corrected from issue 148) of 1.2.1.2 William Sample Sparks who came from Frederick County, Maryland, to North Carolina, about 1760. Matthew Sparks made his will in Surry County on March 26, 1819, and named the following children: (The order changed from Whole Number 190).

1.2.1.2.1.2.1 Nancy Smith,
1.2.1.2.1.2.2 Peggy (Margaret) West.
1.2.1.2.1.2.3 Sally Bray
1.2.1.2.1.2.4 Joel Sparks,
1.2.1.2.1.2.5 George Sparks,
1.2.1.2.1.2.6 Matthew Sparks, Jr.,
1.2.1.2.1.2.7 William Sparks,
1.2.1.2.1.2.8 John Sparks
,

1.2.1.2.1.2.4 Joel Sparks, son of Matthew and brother of William, also served in the War of 1812 (see the September , 1961, issue of the Quarterly, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 579-80 for an abstract of Joel's pension application.)

When 1.2.1.2.1.2.4 Joel Sparks applied for bounty land, William Sparks made a sworn statement dated March 27, 1857, that he and Joel had served in the same company but that "Joel became so disabled on account of a rising in [his] left leg near the ancle as to be unable to continue in service." He added that Joel had been discharged in Hilisboro, Orange County, North Carolina.

1.2.1.2.1.2.7 William D. Sparks signed both of his applications for bounty land simply as "William Sparks." On many other occasions, however, he signed his name as "William D. Sparks." He may have added the middle initial "D" after he became an adult to avoid confusion with the several other William Sparkes in Surry County--there was a William S. Sparks and a William Z. Sparks. On the 1818 tax list for Surry County, he was listed as William D. Sparks with 55 acres of land valued at $60 and located on North Hunting Creek adjoining his father's land.

In March, 1819, probably in anticipation of his approaching death, Matthew Sparks gave land to a number of his children. On March 26, 1819, he deeded 70 acres to his son William "in consideration of the natural love and affection that a parent hath towards a child," This land was described as being on the north side of Hunting Creek in Surry County and adjoining a tract that Matthew gave on the same day to his son George. It also adjoined the Wilkes County line. by the time the tax list was made for Surry County (Capt. Denney's District), Matthew Sparks had died and William D. Sparks was taxed on 115 acres valued at $260 on Hunting Creek, which was described as adjoining the land owned by his mother, Unicy Sparks. He was listed regularly on the Surry County tax lists through 1839, and he was always listed with the middle initial "D".

On August 11, 1827, William D. Sparks sold the land he had received from his father, along with 30 additional acres from an adjoining tract he had acquired earlier, to Wilie Felt for $250. He signed the deed as "William D. Sparks." On September 24, 1827, he sold 5 acres to Philip Holcomb; he signed this deed as "W. D. Sparks." On November 2, 1832, he purchased from David Chappel for $1.00 per acre 65 acres "on the head waters of Hunting Creek near the Brushy Mountain," adjoining the land of Charles Johnson. in. this deed he was named was William D. Sparks. On September 22, 1839, he sola this tract to David Money and signed the deed as "Wm. D. Sparks." His brother, Joel Sparks, signed both of these deeds as a witness. This deed of 1839 is the last deed on file for William D. Sparks in Surry County and it is belived that he moved about this time to Missouri.

There is no marriage bond on record in Surry County for William D. Sparks. (Only about one third of the marriages in North Carolina at this time were legalized through a bond, a much more common practice being that of crying banns, in which cases no record of the marriage was made in the courthouse.) Possibly he was the William Sparks who married Lethey Speer in 1816 (bond dated August 1, 1816) or the William Sparks who married Elizabeth Gentry in 1813 (bond dated January 4, 1813). On the 1850 census of Cooper County, Missouri, however, his wife's name was given as Priscitta Sparks (perhaps intended for Priscilla).

On the 1850 census of Cooper County, Missouri, William D. Sparks is listed as aged 52, whereas he was actually aged 62. It is curious that in this census and well as in his application for bounty land of 1850 he should have made this mistake. According to this census, he was a farmer and owned land valued at $500. His eldest son, Richard M. Sparks, was married by this time and living on a nearby farm, but his other children were still at home. His wife's age was given as 48.

William D. Sparks died sometime prior to 1860. He is known to have been the father of the following children:

1.2.1.2.1.2.7.1 Richard M. Sparks, born May 4, 1829; married Mary C. Duncan. He died April 17, 1893.
1.2.1.2.1.2.7.2 Martin Sparks, born ca. 1832.
1.2.1.2.1.2.7.3 Almeda Sparks, born ca. 1836; she married Mark Kelly.
1.2.1.2.1.2.7.4 Edmond Jones Sparks (called Jones Sparks on the 1850 census) born October 12, 1837.
1.2.1.2.1.2.7.5 Louisa Sparks, born ca. 1839.

Abstracts of the applications for bounty land and pensions made by other Sparkses who served in the War of 1812 will be continued in the next issue of the Quarterly.


Pages 1041-1045
Whole Number 57

SPARKSES IN THE WAR OF 1812
BOUNTY LAND AND PENSION APPLICATIONS

B.1.3.1 WILLIAM J. SPARKS, born in March, 1795, in Franklin County, Georgia, moved to Fayette County, Alabama, prior to 1837, probably before 1830; he was a son of B.1.3 Elijah and Judith (Humphreys) Sparks; he married Naomi Prickett in 1822 (she may have been his second wife); his wife's name on the 1850 & 1860 census is given as Sarah. Bounty Land Application File 26-535-80-55.

On December 30, 1850, William J. Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace named Thomas Wolstenholme in Fayette County, Alabama, to make application for bounty land on the basis of his service in the War of 1812. He gave his age as "fifty-six years next March" and stated that he had served as a private in a company commanded by Captain Benjamin Cleveland in the Georgia Regiment of Volunteers commanded by Lt. Col. Samuel Groves. He stated that he had volunteered in Franklin County, Georgia, on or about September 1, 1813, for the term of six months; be had served out his term and had been discharged at Milledgeville, Georgia, on March 5, 1814. He signed his application in a clear hand as "William Sparks."

William J. Sparks enclosed with his application the hand written discharge which he had received, It was dated March 9, 1814, and was signed by both Capt. Benjamin Cleveland and Samuel Groves. According to records in the Treasury Department, William J. Sparks's service actually began on August 24, 1813, and continued until March 3, 1814. His application was approved and he was issued a warrant (No. 17,050) for 80 acres of bounty land.

On April 9, 1855, William J. Sparks applied for additional bounty land In accordance with the Congressional Act passed that year. He appeared before a justice of the peace named R. Allen Smith in Fayette County, Alabama. He gave his age as 60 years. In this application he erroneously stated that he had served from September 1, 1812, until March 9, 1813, rather than September 1, 1813, until March 9, 1814. He gave no additional information about himself beyond what he had said in 1850. He signed this application as "William J. Sparks." Richard I. Smith and John W. Russell, both residents of Fayette County, signed as witnesses. His application was approved and he was issued a warrant for 80 additional acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: William J. Sparks was a son of Elijah and Judith (Humphreys) Sparks of Franklin County, Georgia. Elijah Sparks is believed to have been a brother of Jeremiah Sparks, Sr., on whom we published an article in the Quarterly of Dec, 1960 (Vol. VIII, No. 4, Whole No. 32, pp. 518-25). Elijah was born ca. 1770 and died in Franklin County, Alabama, in 1831 or 1832. Judith Humphreys, wife of Elijah Sparks, was a daughter of Joseph Humphreys whose will was written on August 16, 1807, and was probated in Jackson County, Georgia. She was born ca. 1775. From deeds and other records on file in Franklin County, it is apparent that Elijah and Judith (Humphreys) Sparks had the following children:

B.1.3.1 William I. (or J.) Sparks, born ca. 1796, married in 1822 Naomi Prickett, and moved to Fayette County, Alabama;
B.1.3.2 Sarah Sparks, born ca. 1800, married Thomas R. Williams;
B.1.3.3 Amelia Sparks, born June 15, 1803, married John Bryson Word;
B.1.3.4 Thomas K. Sparks, born ca. 1807, married 1826 Elizabeth J. Wyly;
B.1.3.5 Malinda Sparks, born ca. 1810, married Benajah Williams in 1830;
B.1.3.6 Mary Sparks or Polly, married Jesse Carter Hooper; and
B.1.3.7 a daughter who married Matthew Robertson.

When it was that William J. Sparks moved to Fayette County, Alabama, we are not certain. He was there by February 2, 1837, when his mother, Judith Sparks, sold him three slaves; in the deed he was identified as "of Fayette County, Alabama." (See Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Book DD, p. 248.)

There is a marriage bond on file in Franklin County, Georgia, dated February 14, 1822, for the marriage of William J. Sparks and Naomi Prickett. It seems probable that this was the same William J. Sparks, but it also seems probable that he had been married previously. He must have been the William Sparks listed on the 1830 census of Fayette County, Alabama. According to that census enumeration, there were, besides himself and his wife, the following children:

1 male born between 1815 and 1820
2 males born between 1820 and 1825
1 male born between 1825 and 1830
1 female born between 1815 and 1820
1 female born between 1825 and 1830

If the two older children were the son and daughter of William J. Sparks, Naomi could not have been their mother. They may, of course, have been relatives or hired hands, or William J. Sparks may have been married prior to his marriage to Naomi in 1822.

When the 1850 census was taken, William J. Sparks's wife's name was given as Sarah; she was probably his second or third wife. She was listed as aged 54 years, as was also her husband. Living with them were the following persons, probably all children of William J. Sparks:

Jackson M. Sparks born in Alabama about 1830
Milly Sparks " 1833
George Sparks " 1836
Phebe Sparks " 1839

It is believed that the Russell Sparks listed on this 1850 census as living on a farm adjoining that of William J. Sparks was also a son. Russell Sparks was born in Georgia about 1819 (his age was given as 31). His wife's name was given as Nancy and living with them was Sarah Sparks, aged 5, and Barshaba Sparks, aged 3. They were doubtless daughters of Russell and Nancy Sparks.

William J. Sparks and his wife Sarah were still living when the 1860 census was taken of Fayette County. Living with them then was a nine-year-old boy named William R. Sparks who was probably a grandson. In 1860, Sarah and Barshaba Sparks, believed to have been daughters of Russell Sparks, were living with the family of Samuel and Nancy Hollingsworth. It is probable that Russell Sparks had died by 1860 and this his widow, Nancy, had married Samuel Hollingsworth.)

WRIGHT BRUCE SPARKS, born May 6, 1785, in Harford County, Maryland; moved to Franklin County, Indiana, in 1816 where he was still living in 1871; he married in Harford County, Maryland, in 1805, Mangya von Magnus, whose name was anglicized to Nancy Ann Magnus. Bounty Land Warrant File 89-000-160-55.

On January 2, 1851, Wright Sparks, a resident of Franklin County, Indiana, appeared before a justice of the peace named Peter H. Lemex (?) in Madison County, Indiana, to make application for bounty land. Wright Sparks stated that he was 64 years old and that he had served as a private in Captain John Turner's company in Col. Wesey's (or Veazey's) Regiment of Maryland Militia. He stated that "he was called in the 'general call'" for troops at Harford County, Maryland, in the latter part of August 1814 and had served for about two months. He believed he had been discharged in Nov, 1814, but could not remember the exact date. He stated that he had not received a written discharge. He signed his application as Wright Sparks.

No record of the service of Wright Sparks could be found in the Treasury Department and, since be could not present a written discharge, no action was taken on his applicatipn for bounty land.

On July 11, 1856, Wright Sparks appeared before a notary public in Franklin County, Indiana, named Alfred Ward to make application for bounty land under the Congressional Act of 1855. He stated that he had not received a grant under the old act. He gave his age as 71 years and swore that he had served in the War of 1812 as a private in a company commanded by John Turner in the 42d Regiment of Maryland Militia in the summer of 1814 "when all the Militia of Baltimore, Harford, and Frederick Counties were called out for the defence of Baltimore." He stated that he had served from about August 28, 1814, until about October 26, 1814. He signed his application in a clear hand and his signature was witnessed by William Stooks and John D. Howland of Franklin County.

Along with this application, Wright Sparks submitted a sworn statement by Joseph Walker and Matthew Hunt, both residents of Baltimore County, Maryland, dated March 24, 1856, that "Wright Sparks did perform military service under Captain John Turner in the War of 1812, that they knew said Wright Sparks well before & after the war, and saw him while performing said service." He also submitted two other statements. One was signed by Walker Walker on February 16, 1856, in Baltimore County, Maryland, and the other by Ephraim Bell on February 23, 1856, also in Baltimore. Both Turner and Bell swore that Sparks had served as he claimed.

On June 27, 1859, Wright Sparks again made his claim for bounty land. He was now 74 years old, still a resident of Franklin County, Indiana. In this application, he stated that he "was enrolled in Harford County at a place called Block House or Cooptown on or about the 27th or 28th of August 1814." He claimed that he had continued in service until the latter part of October. He signed his application in a clear hand as Wright Sparks. John W. Keely and Wilson Morrow, both residents of Franklin County, signed as witnesses.

With his 1859 application, Wright Sparks submitted a sworn statement by John Wiley and Nicholas Shaw, residents of Harford County, Maryland, dated June 4, 1859. They swore "that they were well acquainted with Wright Sparks ... [and] that they mustered in the same company under Captain John Turner of the 40th Regiment, Md. Militia, that they marched to Baltimore from Hartrford County, Md., under Captain John Turner to do Battle for their Country and was there on Military duty for more than 14 days, know him to be a faithful and good Soldier and a true Patriot." They added that they had each received 160 acres of bounty land.

Finally on August 22, 1859, a record was found in the Treasury Department proving that Wright Sparks had served in Captain John Turner's Company, beginning on August 28, 1814, and that "he Is reported furloughed 21 September 1814 for 6 days." His application was now approved and he was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

On April 24, 1871, Wright Sparks appeared before Samuel S. Harrell, clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Indiana, to make application for a pension for his service in the War of 1812. He stated that he was 85 years old and a resident of Mt, Carmel in Whitewater Township, Franklin County. He stated that his wife's name was Nancy Magnus to whom he had been married in Harford County, Maryland, in September , 1805. He gave no new information regarding his service in the War of 1812. He signed this application by mark in the presence of Walter Mitchell of Whitewater Township and William B. Maddook of Brookville, Indiana. His application was rejected on April 16, 1872 "by reason of insufficient service."

(Editor's Note: Wright Bruce Sparks was born in Harford County, Maryland, on May 6, 1785, and was a son of Francis and (Wright) Sparks. A biographical sketch of Wright B. Sparks appeared in the Quarterly of March 1966, Vol. XIV, No. 1, Whole No. 53, pp. 974-76.)

ZACHARIAH SPARKS, born in Newberry County, South Carolina, about 1780; a resident of Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, as late as 1860; probably never married. Bounty Land Warrant File 10 -265 -160 -55.

On October 31, 1850, Zachariah Sparks appeared before a justice of the peace named Amos L. Sewell in Clinton County, Ohio, to make application for bounty land. He stated that he was 70 years old, was a resident of Clinton County, Ohio, and that he had served as a private in a company commanded by Captain Benjamin Lewis in Col. Starling Tucker's regiment in the War of 1812. He stated that "he was drafted at Lawrence District in the State of South Carolina on or about the first day of March AD 1814, according to his best recollection for the term of three months and continued in actual service for the term of about seven weeks." He added that he had been honorably discha"ged "at Sheldon Hill near Beaufort Island, South Carolina" sometime in April 1814. He could not recall having received a written discharge, but "he recollects distinctly that he received the sum of fourteen dollars for his services." He signed his application as "Z. Sparks."

An auditor in the Treasury Department reported on February 13, 1851, that "the muster rolls of Captain Benjamin Lewis do not appear to be on file in this office, but I find by the pay rolls of Col. Tucker that Zachariah Sparks, a private, received $13.95 in the year 1814." Zachariah Sparks was issued a warrant for 40 acres of bounty land (No. 2847) on April 10, 1851.

On April 19, 1855, Zachariah Sparks appeared before A. C. Diboll (?), mayor of the village of Wilmington in Clinton County, Ohio, to make application for additional bounty land under the new Congressional Act. He stated he was 75 years old and a resident of Clinton County, Ohio. He gave no additional data regarding his service. He again signed his name as "Z. Sparks." He had never turned in his warrant for bounty land, so he now returned it to the Treasury Department to be added to his new warrant. Joseph K. Sparks and David Linton, both of Clinton County, signed as witnesses.

The application of Zachariah Sparks was approved and he was issued a warrant for 160 acres of bounty land.

(Editor's Note: Zachariah Sparks, born in South Carolina about 1780, was a son of Stephen Sparks of Newberry County, South Carolina, who died July 10, 1816. Apparently Zachariah Sparks never married. When the 1850 census and the 1860 census were taken of Wilmington, Ohio, he was listed as living in the household of his brother, Dr. Joseph K. Sparks. His age in 1860 was given as 80. (See the Quarterly of September 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 570-76, for a record of Zachariah's father and grandfather. Dr. Joseph K. Sparks, brother of Zachariah, also received bounty land for service in the War of 1812--see the Quarterly for September , 1961, Vol. IX, No. 3, Whole No. 35, pp. 588-89.)

This now completes our abstracts of bounty land and pension applications of persons named Sparks who served in the War of 1812. We have progressed from Aaron Sparks to Zacharia Sparks, with seventy-four others in between.

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